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Diverse Thinking Different Learning

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Diverse Thinking · Different Learning, a ChildNEXUS podcast, is hosted by pediatric neuropsychologist, mom of two, and ChildNEXUS founder Dr. Karen Wilson. Each week, Dr. Wilson provides support and guidance for parents raising kids with learning differences. Diverse Thinking · Different Learning features informative and inspiring interviews with top experts in their fields, and gives parents and educators the tools and takeaways they need to better understand neurodivergence, learning disabilities, and youth mental health. This podcast informs offers actionable advice to help diverse learners and children with unique needs reach their fullest potential. Parents of diverse learners or children with mental health challenges can access vetted information and connect with qualified professionals at https://www.childnexus.com/.

Location:

United States

Genres:

Family

Description:

Diverse Thinking · Different Learning, a ChildNEXUS podcast, is hosted by pediatric neuropsychologist, mom of two, and ChildNEXUS founder Dr. Karen Wilson. Each week, Dr. Wilson provides support and guidance for parents raising kids with learning differences. Diverse Thinking · Different Learning features informative and inspiring interviews with top experts in their fields, and gives parents and educators the tools and takeaways they need to better understand neurodivergence, learning disabilities, and youth mental health. This podcast informs offers actionable advice to help diverse learners and children with unique needs reach their fullest potential. Parents of diverse learners or children with mental health challenges can access vetted information and connect with qualified professionals at https://www.childnexus.com/.

Language:

English


Episodes
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Ep. 194: What Is Neurodiversity-Affirming Care?

7/16/2024
Awareness and understanding of neurodiversity have been expanding in our society along with the need and opportunity for neurodiversity-affirming care. I'm thrilled to have Kody Harms joining me this week. Kody is a neuro-affirming therapist, educator, and advocate with over 15 years of experience working with neurodiverse children, teens, and adults. As a board-certified behavior analyst and co-owner of Curated Family Therapeutics, Kody brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to our discussion on neurodiversity. In today's episode, we'll explore what it means to give and receive neuro-affirming care. Neurodiversity impacts individuals differently, and it's crucial to recognize and celebrate these differences rather than viewing them as deficits. We'll discuss how society's understanding of neurodiversity has grown significantly, reflecting our expanding knowledge about the brain and the diverse ways it can function. With the rise of social media and ongoing research, we're hearing more diverse voices and gaining a deeper appreciation of the vastness of the neurodiversity spectrum. Teachers and administrators play a pivotal role in shaping opportunities for neurodivergent youth. By fostering inclusive environments and embracing the unique qualities everyone brings to the table, we can create a more understanding and accepting world. Kody is passionate about creating inclusive environments and offering individualized support based on the needs of each student, parent, or client. Tune in to learn more about understanding and accepting people for all the beautiful differences they bring. Show Notes: [02:12] - At Curated Family Therapeutics they have three modes of support: 1. One to one acceptance and commitment therapy for neurodiverse teams and adults. 2. Working with parents of neurodivergent children. 3. Applying the one to one therapy in the classroom. [04:07] - Their work extends from getting the diagnosis and supporting the family to high school and adulthood. [05:17] - For Kody, incorporating neuro-affirming ideas begins with questioning his own neurotypical norms and how he was raised. Each generation gets more empathetic and celebratory of neurodiversity. [06:30] - Kody doesn't want to change who anybody is, he just wants to help them find the best version of themselves. [07:03] - We want to change the environment so that it supports the differences in the way that our brains are wired. [07:50] - Educating parents is a large part of neuro-affirming support. Creating neuro-affirming care within education is also very important. [09:30] - Practices educators can adopt include creating opportunities for social and emotional learning within the whole classroom so as not to isolate the individual, and identify that everybody does this differently. [10:36] - It's important for everybody to have an opportunity to regulate. [11:37] - It's important to start understanding how everyone's brain works differently at an early age like kindergarten. [13:34] - Part of learning is just noticing things and bringing them to the attention of the students. [14:09] - A project they recently did is taking the social and emotional learning that they're doing at school and applying it at home. [16:24] - Schools have visual mediums but they don't always do a good job explicitly teaching them. Kody likes to make schedules for his neurodivergent students and teach it as a skill. [17:35] - Creating visuals and allowing students to have a say is a general universal strategy. [19:31] - Kody's goal is not to add things, but to adapt the day. [20:22] - Acceptance and commitment therapy is acknowledging that challenges are going to be presented. If you're working towards your values and the things that guide you, you can't go wrong. [22:12] - They begin with a values assessment. Kody wants to know what's important to the student, parent, or client. [23:41] - Acceptance is critical for the whole piece of providing...

Duration:00:29:52

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Ep. 193: Independent College Consultants: Who Needs One and When?

7/9/2024
Summer is here, and many graduates are looking into the college application process. If you’re not sure where to start, a college consultant can help make this stressful period much easier for students and parents alike. Today, we dive into everything about independent college consultants. What exactly are they? What is their role, and how do they help our students? We’ll explore who might benefit from hiring an independent consultant and address the specific needs of students with learning and thinking differences, such as dyslexia and ADHD. I’m joined by independent college consultant Matthew Hayutin, Founder and Partner at Hayutin Education. Matthew began his career as a classroom teacher and private educational therapist, working with students of all ages and learning profiles. He has extensive experience as a college consultant and homeschool teacher. If you’re not familiar with the role of a college consultant, Matthew breaks it down with insights into how the consultant's role can be customized to meet the individual needs of students and their families. College consultants can assist with researching and vetting schools and programs, helping to ensure students find the best fit, and navigating the application and admissions process. Matthew is passionate about his position and emphasizes the importance of helping students find ways to contribute and become active citizens. He discusses using targeted questions to understand students' needs and explore options that facilitate a smooth transition from high school to college. This episode is a must-listen for anyone navigating the complexities of college admissions. Tune in and discover why investing in an independent college consultant could be the game-changer your learner needs. Show Notes: [00:03] - Public School students may have a student counselor with 500 students, and the connection points are far and few between. Having someone who could work individually with the student and get to know them is very valuable. [05:19] - Another reason that a consultant could be helpful is that they are available in the summer when your counselor isn't. A lot of work can get done in the summer to build momentum and create a runway for the fall. [08:17] - Having someone who can really drill into what will help the student and assist with the process. [09:19] - Why would someone seek out an independent college consultant? There are multiple reasons including access and availability, especially over the summer, expertise, skill set, and bandwidth. [10:28] - The role of the college consultant. A strong consultant can help students create a list of schools that will accept them with open arms and ones that might be a bit of a stretch but worth the effort. [13:53] - They also help build executive functioning instead of doing everything for the student. [14:12] - The goal isn't just to get in. It's to find a place where the students thrive. A consultant can help find a good match for an environment where the student will thrive and ultimately graduate. [16:54] - Asking questions is part of the process of working with an independent consultant. [19:47] - What can we expect in terms of accommodation for students who have unique needs. [23:11] - One of the advantages of working with a college consultant is they spend time with the student and get to know their individual needs. [25:58] - Questions to ask when trying to determine if a consultant is a good fit is the amount of access, feedback, and timeline. [30:02] - Working with an independent college consultant can be a valuable investment for many families trying to work through the complexity of future college. About Our Guest: Matthew Hayutin is a Founder & Partner at Hayutin Education, a company that he founded with his sister, Amy Hayutin Contreras. Hayutin is your partner in education offering executive functioning, educational therapy, independent study, tutoring, test prep, and college consulting. They assist...

Duration:00:33:32

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Ep. 192: Reimagining Education for All Students with Sylvia Barreto Benites

7/2/2024
Today, we have a truly inspiring guest joining us from the heart of the jungle in Costa Rica. She’s the director of the Renaissance Institute (iREN), a trailblazing educational program that is redefining how we approach learning for all students, especially those with learning differences. We’re excited to dive deep into her insights and experiences on how she combines neuroscience, psychology, and pedagogy to create a transformative learning environment. Sylvia’s journey began in 2020 when she established a small homeschool for teenagers to help them navigate distance learning during the pandemic. This initiative quickly grew into the Renaissance Institute, a unique educational environment in beautiful Costa Rica. Throughout our conversation, Sylvia will share her motivations and the personal experiences that drove her to build this unique program. She created the kind of educational environment she wished she had as a child, which resonates deeply with many parents today. We’ll explore how differentiation and a sense of safety are crucial in education, yet often missing. Sylvia believes in creating spaces where students feel safe to make mistakes and learn from them, an essential component in fostering resilience. By the end of this episode, you'll have a new perspective on how education can be transformed to meet the needs of every child. Sylvia's story is a powerful reminder that with the right mindset and approach, we can create learning environments that not only educate but also heal and empower our students. Show Notes: [2:17] - It is a time of real opportunity for change in education right now. [3:18] - Sylvia describes the motivations she has had in building this unique learning environment in Costa Rica. [5:05] - In 2020, Sylvia established a small homeschool for teenagers in Costa Rica to help them navigate through distance learning. It grew into iREN. [8:01] - Students are highly involved in creating and establishing their own learning environment in a way that establishes trust. [10:12] - It is important for the attention to be given to the students who are doing the right thing. A lot of neurodivergent students are accustomed to being yelled at. [12:09] - Sylvia has created the program that she wished she had had as a child. Many parents feel the same way. [13:40] - Differentiation is important, but we can’t differentiate so much that there is no normalcy. [15:11] - Another missing piece in education is love and a sense of safety. [17:57] - Create a space where students can make mistakes. [20:50] - Students want to learn impulse control but often feel like they can’t. [23:47] - It is a reality that many parents are afraid of their child and fearful that they cannot support them. [26:33] - What brings a student happiness? Can we create a sense of acceptance and well-being where a child feels happy in their learning environment? [27:50] - Diagnoses are important, but many people focus on the negatives which creates a sense of hopelessness. [30:10] - Sylvia is confident that healing herself and changing her own mindset was the first step in creating iREN for students and families. [34:01] - Children are struggling, which is what it all boils down to. What can we do? [38:10] - Grades do not typically motivate a student. Parents care more about grades than students do. We need to help students find their intrinsic motivation. About Our Guest: Sylvia serves as the founder and director of the Renaissance Institute in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Established in 2020, the Renaissance Institute (iREN) aims to engage children beyond screens by inviting them to explore a 33-acre forested campus. iREN integrates neuroscience, psychology, and pedagogy to unleash the potential of children facing challenges. The program prioritizes children's social-emotional requirements, cultivating resilience and hands-on learning tailored to each child's unique learning style. With small class sizes, the institute...

Duration:00:41:41

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Ep. 191: How CBT Helps Kids and Teens with Social Anxiety with Dr. Sarah Olivo

6/25/2024
Today, we're diving into a topic that affects many kids, teens, and adults: social anxiety. Social anxiety is more than just the usual nervousness or shyness; it can significantly impact daily life, making even the simplest social interactions panic-inducing. We're going to break down what social anxiety is, how it differs from normal social worries, and most importantly, how to spot it in children and teens. Our guest today is Sarah Olivo, Ph.D., a licensed clinical psychologist with over 20 years of experience. Sarah specializes in evidence-based treatments, particularly CBT, and is dedicated to helping children, teens, and young adults overcome anxiety and achieve meaningful change in their lives. As the Head of Lumate Academy, Sarah is passionate about spreading the benefits of CBT to those with limited access to these life-changing therapies. In this episode, we'll explore the various types of treatment options available, with a particular focus on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). We'll also discuss practical ways parents and educators can support kids and teens struggling with social anxiety. Understanding the difference between typical developmental anxiety and social anxiety is crucial. While it's normal for kids to experience some level of anxiety as they grow, social anxiety is characterized by an intense fear of being judged or embarrassed in social situations, often leading to panic. With Sarah’s guidance, by the end of this episode, you'll better understand social anxiety, its impact, and the powerful ways we can help our kids and teens manage and overcome it. Show Notes: [2:18] - Many kids and teens experience anxiety and a lot of times they are a normal part of growing up. [3:29] - Some of the questions asked are, “How frequently is anxiety happening?” and “Is it causing a lot of distress for the child or the family?” [4:57] - There are types of anxiety that are developmentally appropriate to experience at different stages of development. [6:00] - The core of social anxiety is the fear of being judged by others and embarrassed in some way. [7:01] - For many kids and teens with social anxiety, social situations are panic-inducing. [8:38] - There is also Generalized Anxiety Disorder which does differ from social anxiety. [11:28] - As parents, we can read our child’s mind. There are times when we won’t be able to tell the thoughts that lead to anxiety. [13:33] - For those with social anxiety, it’s not that they don’t know how to act in certain situations. [15:27] - There are ways to get help. One of the most effective treatments for social anxiety is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) [18:04] - Social situations activate the threat center for those with social anxiety. [21:19] - For treating social anxiety, goals will be different for each individual. [23:25] - Social anxiety is far different from simply being an introvert. [26:23] - Individual programs are fine, but group programs are excellent for helping overcome social anxiety struggles and meet goals. [29:04] - Privacy is a concern for some group programs, but it is not something to worry about. [32:18] - Social anxiety that goes unmanaged can lead to chronic anxiety. [35:15] - If someone as a child or a teenager struggles with social anxiety, it is likely that a parent also does. [38:07] - At school, teachers tend to cater to a child or teen’s social anxiety. [39:56] - Oftentimes we only notice the negatives. We need to notice when a child is working on their struggles and practicing the things they’re learning. About Our Guest: Sarah Olivo, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist who believes that empathy, collaboration, and a sense of humor are the bases for any good therapy. Sarah is a staunch believer in evidenced-based psychology and has worked diligently to become fluent in many forms of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). In short, Sarah’s approach has rigorous research at its core, and she continually seeks out...

Duration:00:45:04

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Ep. 190: Should Your Teen Take a Gap Year? with Julia Rogers

6/18/2024
In this episode, we’re exploring something that is often misunderstood and rarely talked about: gap years. Many parents and students don’t really know exactly what a gap year is or how taking one could be the right choice for them. So today, we are exploring the benefits and considerations of gap years for teens and young adults with learning differences. I’m thrilled to introduce our guest, Julia Rogers, a professional gap year counselor and founder of EnRoute Counseling. Julia is an expert on this topic, and she’s here to shed light on how gap years can be particularly beneficial for those who learn and think differently. A gap year is more than just a break from academics; it’s an intentional period of personal growth supported by diverse learning opportunities. We have a lot of misconceptions about what gap years really are, so having Julia break it down will provide a lot to think about. Over the past 15 years, the reasons people choose to take a gap year have evolved, and Julia will share some common motivations behind this decision. She will also discuss the unique benefits that gap years can offer to different types of students, including the opportunity to develop social skills and catch up, especially in the post-pandemic world. The ultimate goal is to guide our young people into a life of fulfillment. Join us as we dive into the world of gap years with Julia Rogers, and discover if this might be the right path for your teen to thrive. Show Notes: [3:17] - A gap year is an intentional period of personal growth supported by learning opportunities. [4:35] - Over the last 15 years, the reasons people choose to take a gap year have shifted and changed. Julia shares a lot of common ones. [5:59] - The benefits are a lot different for different types of students. [7:23] - Benefits can also include “catching up” and developing social skills, especially now post-pandemic. [8:45] - When working with her students, Julia sets three types of goals with them: personal, practical, and professional. [11:01] - There are endless possibilities of what a gap year could look like. [12:04] - If a young adult knows they want to be college bound, it is possible to apply and defer, or they can wait till after their gap year to begin applying. [15:47] - The goal is to guide our young people into a life of fulfillment. [17:48] - Julia describes gap year programs and what they offer. [20:16] - What role should parents play in planning or supporting the plan for a gap year? [23:45] - Give yourself the permission to explore nontraditional plans and paths for success. [24:32] - There are some reasons that a gap year is not recommended, including certain scholarships or financial aid. [26:59] - Julia lists the different types of gap year programming opportunities that could benefit students with learning differences. [29:24] - A gap year is a great time for students to “get out of their bubble.” That means different things for different students. About Our Guest: Julia Rogers is an internationally recognized speaker, entrepreneur, and expert in experiential education with over 14 years of experience as a professional gap year counselor. She is the founder of EnRoute Consulting, a socially responsible enterprise aimed at fueling the gap year movement and cultivating a generation of compassionate, driven, and resourceful global citizens. Julia partners with educators, service-learning organizations, non-profits, government entities and families around the world to develop creative educational pathways that result in young adults being better prepared to succeed in life and work. Julia is a TEDx speaker, a podcast host and President Emeritus of the Gap Year Association, a US-based nonprofit dedicated to the intentional growth of the gap year option through research, standards-setting and advocacy efforts. Connect with Julia: EnRoute Counseling Instagram LinkedIn Email: Julia@enroutegapyear.com Links and Related...

Duration:00:31:35

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Ep. 189: The Private School Option for Kids with Learning Differences with Collette Bowers Zinn

6/11/2024
Welcome to today's episode, where we are navigating the complex landscape of public and private school options for children with learning differences. While many families have had great experiences in both settings, others face challenges that necessitate exploring alternative educational environments. Today, we're diving into the independent school option for those with learning differences, with the expertise of our guest, Collette Bowers Zinn. Collette Bowers Zinn brings over 20 years of dedication to connecting children with the educational environment that is best for them. As a litigator, fourth-generation educator, and founder of multiple educational initiatives, Collette's unique background equips her with insights into the educational system. She founded Private School Axis and Zinn Education Management aiming to bridge the gap between families and schools while promoting diversity, equity, inclusion, and accountability. In this episode, we’ll discuss why some parents are turning to independent schools, particularly when public schools fall short, especially for kids of color. Collette shares her personal journey with her children's education and provides her advice on finding the right match for your child's needs. We'll also address the misconceptions about private school affordability and accessibility, along with financial aid options. Collette emphasizes the importance of family and school partnerships, transparency, and thorough research to ensure the best educational fit for your child. Show Notes: [2:47] - The primary reason many parents are seeking independent school enrollment is because public schools have failed some of our kids, especially kids of color.[3:38] - There are a lot of things to consider - class size, case load for teachers, state testing, and government regulations.[5:15] - Private schools are more accessible and affordable than most people think.[6:46] - There are some cons that people need to consider about private education as well. No system is perfect.[8:23] - With current circumstances, Collette’s children attend an independent school. You have to find the right match for your child.[9:32] - To properly support a child in their learning journey, the family has to be in partnership with whatever educational institution they choose.[10:52] - It is equally as important to interview the institution as it is for the institution to interview you. Ask all the questions needed to make a decision.[14:18] - The only way to develop a thriving partnership is through transparency.[15:38] - It is important to remember that independent schools are businesses. Do your research to find what is the right match for you.[18:12] - At the end of the day, the end goal for you, your child, and the institution is the same: finding the best place for your child.[20:17] - You can’t be connected and in partnership without showing up.[21:10] - Collette discusses financial aid options for private school tuition.[24:32] - How do children navigate the socioeconomic differences between students in private schools?[28:12] - Prioritize gratitude over focusing on socioeconomic status.[29:56] - No matter what, everyone should be able to access a learning environment that will lead them to a lifetime of amazing experiences.[30:55] - Diversity within a learning environment leads to better outcomes for all learners.[32:19] - Collette has started a non-profit called Private School Axis to aid students in accessing the educational route that is best for them.[36:07] - Dream big and learn what you wish was different. Take that list and formulate the must-haves for your child’s learning environment and start the research. About Our Guest: For more than 20 years, Collette Bowers Zinn has been dedicated to bringing impact and humanity to the work of connecting children with high caliber education. Her unique professional experiences, both as a litigator and fourth-generation educator, have deeply informed her mission to serve...

Duration:00:40:47

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Ep. 188: Enhancing Reading Skills Through Speech-Language Therapy with Stacy Payne MS, CCC-SLP

6/4/2024
Today, I’m excited to discuss the profound impact of early language and speech experiences on cognitive and academic skills, specifically reading skills. Joining us is a seasoned expert in the field, Stacy Payne, a speech-language pathologist and the founder of Bright Beginnings Pediatric Services. Stacy shares her insights on the importance of creating a language-rich environment for children from an early age. She explains how these early interactions, much more than simple bedtime stories, are integral to cognitive development. Through everyday activities and conversations, parents and caregivers can significantly influence a child's language acquisition and communication skills. We also explore the complexity of the developing brain and how language and communication skills evolve throughout childhood. Stacy highlights the importance of repetition in creating new neural pathways and how incorporating language-building strategies into daily routines, like grocery shopping, can make a huge difference. For those concerned about missing critical language milestones in early childhood, Stacy offers reassurance that the brain can learn new skills and adapt at any age. She also shares exciting opportunities to maximize learning during the summer months, including intensive skill-building camps provided by Bright Beginnings Pediatric Services. This is definitely a conversation you don’t want to miss! Show Notes: About Our Guest: Stacy St. Amant Payne is a licensed speech-language pathologist who holds the Certificate of Clinical Competency awarded by the American Speech Language and Hearing Association, a certified lactation educator, a certified ADHD-Rehabilitation Services Provider, and an extensively trained clinician and lecturer in the areas of dysphagia, motor speech disorders, reading disabilities, language-based learning disorders, and ADHD. She is the recipient of several ACE awards from ASHA for her ongoing commitment to continuing education. Stacy founded Bright Beginnings Pediatric Services over 10 years ago after 20 years in the field of medical speech pathology, with a mission to help children in the community who are experiencing feeding, speech, language, reading, and learning challenges. Connect with Stacy Payne: Bright Beginnings Pediatric Services WebsiteBBPSLA on InstagramYouTube Channel Links and Related Resources: Top 5 Signs You Need a Speech and Language Pathologist Episode 102: Everyday Activities That Help Build Language Skills with Stefanie Trenholme Writing Disorders in Children: The Language Link Connect with Us: Get on our Email ListBook a ConsultationGet Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS ProviderRegister for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc. or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:48:53

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Ep. 187: What is Social Learning? with Fran Kenton

5/28/2024
In today’s episode, I’m thrilled to have Fran Kenton with us to discuss social emotional learning (SEL). Fran holds a Master’s degree in Educational Psychology, along with credentials in General and Special Education, and is a Certified Health and Wellness Coach. She is the founder of Autonome, a dynamic and interactive SEL program designed for teens and young adults. In our conversation today, we’ll explore how Fran's unique approach can cultivate crucial skills in kids and teens. She shares insights on what motivated her to focus on SEL, the importance of understanding what motivates a child, and how SEL encompasses a broad range of life skills. We’ll discuss the proven benefits of SEL, its integration into curriculum, and why these skills are best taught in an educational setting where all children can be reached. Recognizing a critical gap in traditional education, Fran founded Autonome to integrate SEL and mindfulness practices into the learning experience. Her innovative approach equips young people with the necessary skills to manage life's complexities, fostering self-awareness, self-management, responsible decision-making, social awareness, and relationship skills. These competencies form the foundation of Autonome’s program, reflecting a culmination of Fran’s experiences. Join us as Fran Kenton shares her vision for empowering young people with the tools they need to navigate life successfully. Show Notes: About Our Guest: Fran Kenton, M.A. in Educational Psychology with credentials in general and special education, is the founder of Autonome, a social emotional learning (SEL) program for teens and young adults. With a background as a middle school teacher and counselor in the Lawndale School District, Fran has extensive experience working with at-risk youth. She later continued her career in the Las Virgenes Unified School District, focusing on special needs students and co-creating the Transition Curriculum to aid their post-high school transitions. Certified as a Health and Wellness Coach, she also provides life coaching services and works with The Robert and Susan Kozlowski L.I.F.T. Foundation. Fran's dedication to integrating SEL and mindfulness into education led to the creation of Autonome, aimed at equipping young people with essential life skills. Connect with Fran Kenton: Autonome101.comfran@autonome101.com Links and Related Resources: What is Social Thinking? Episode 79: How to Develop Social Thinking Skills with Michelle Garcis Winner Connect with Us: Get on our Email ListBook a ConsultationGet Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS ProviderRegister for Our Self-Paced Anxiety, ADHD and Youth Anxiety Mini Courses The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:34:32

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Ep. 186: Final Sprint: Tips for a Strong School Year Finish - Hunja Koimburi

5/21/2024
Welcome back to another episode of Diverse Thinking Different Learning! Tune in this episode as Dr. Karen Wilson welcomes educational therapist Hunja Koimburi to the podcast to discuss end-of-year strategies for students with learning differences. As the school year winds down, students and parents alike face many challenges, including but not limited to completing final projects and managing increased stress levels. Hunja shares his expertise on how parents can support their children during this critical time, highlighting how important it is to understand the unique needs of students with learning differences. He reveals what initially drew him to this field and how his journey from studying economics and law to educational therapy has molded the ways that he helps students. He discusses the importance of using personalized strategies that are tailored to each individual student's unique learning challenge(s), focusing especially on time management and prioritizing tasks. Hunja also elaborates upon practical advice for parents to help their children finish the school year strong, discussing how breaking down large projects into manageable tasks and encouraging a balance between academic commitments and social activities can help relieve overwhelm and stress. Hunja also touches on the importance of helping students reflect on past experiences to improve future performance. As summer quickly approaches, Hunja offers practical ways that parents can effectively use this time to support their child's learning and development, suggesting that parents use the summer to focus on areas that need improvement, but he emphasizes the value of maintaining a balance between relaxation and productive activities to ensure students return to school feeling confident and prepared. Hunja’s insights are a valuable resource for parents seeking to support their children through the end of the academic year and beyond, so tune in to gain practical strategies for helping your child navigate the end-of-year pressures and make the most of their summer break, setting them up for a successful start to the next school year. Show Notes: [2:10] - Hunja Koimburi is here to share his expertise on supporting students with learning differences as they transition to college. [3:01] - Inspired by his experience supporting students with learning differences, Hunja empowers educators and parents to specially tailor teaching and parenting strategies. [5:32] - Hunja emphasizes the importance of addressing learning differences to support students during busy school periods. [8:49] It's important to break down large projects and prioritize them to avoid overwhelm. [11:09] Hunja highlights the need for helping students with learning differences with time management and prioritization. [14:10] Executive functioning coaching can help tackle time blindness and enhance study techniques. [15:01] - Hunja values strategic planning over impulsive optimism to help students with learning differences manage their time. [17:32] - Hunja argues that supporting students with learning difficulties through compassion and practical time management strategies is most effective. [20:56] - Parents can relieve pressure on students by providing external support and temporarily reducing their chores during busy times. [22:43] - Some students experience a downward spiral of anxiety and self-doubt about their academic performance. [24:46] - Providing early deadlines can help students with learning differences manage workloads and reduce anxiety. [26:56] - Help students prepare for transitions and familiarize themselves with upcoming materials in order to reduce stress and overwhelm. [28:17] - Hunja reiterates the importance of early deadlines and long lead times. [31:19] - Short-term rewards motivate students, especially when they're exhausted from a long academic year. [34:51] - Hunja highlights self-paced online tools like IXL and ALEKS for learning differences, adding...

Duration:00:41:52

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Ep. 185: Late Diagnosis: Why Did I Get Missed? with Dr. Monica Blied

5/14/2024
Hey there, welcome back to Diverse Thinking Different Learning! Today, we're diving into a topic that's often overlooked but incredibly important: late diagnoses of ADHD and autism, particularly in women, people of color, and LGBTQ individuals. It's a conversation that's long overdue, and we're so grateful to have Dr. Monica Blied joining us to shed some light on this crucial issue. As a clinical psychologist and founder of Faces of Health, Dr. Blied brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to the table. In her private practice, she specializes in providing psychological assessments for adults and children who suspect they may have Autism, ADHD, or learning differences. With a keen focus on supporting adults living with chronic medical and mental illnesses, Dr. Blied has dedicated her career to helping individuals navigate the complex intersection of mental and physical health. Today, dive deep into the reasons why certain conditions like ADHD and autism are often diagnosed late, despite their significant impact on individuals' lives. From systemic biases to misconceptions and missed opportunities for support, Dr. Blied will be sharing invaluable insights and advice for anyone who suspects they may be struggling with an undiagnosed condition and what parents can look for in their children that could be signs of struggle. Show Notes: About Our Guest: Dr. Monica Blied is a clinical psychologist, adjunct professor of psychology at Pepperdine, and the founder of Faces of Health in Claremont, California. In her private practice, Dr. Blied provides psychological assessments for adults and children who suspect they have Autism, ADHD, and/or learning differences. With a special interest in supporting adults who are living with chronic medical and mental illnesses, Dr. Blied has also developed expertise in the mind-body health connection. She currently serves as the Chair-Elect (and former Treasurer) of the California Psychological Association's Division of Education and Training, where she has been a member of the Executive Board for over 10 years. Since 2020, she has also served as a Medical Advisory Board member with Lupus LA, a role which allows her to continue giving back to her fellow Lupus Warriors. In 2022, Dr. Blied developed the Faces of Health app, which teaches mental health and stress management skills via brief, educational videos, all taught by women of color. In 2024, she added to her online educational suite a course on Adult ADHD and Autism, and another on Stress Management using Neuroscience. Links and Related Resources: Episode 99: Straight Talk About ADHD in Girls with Dr. Stephen Hinshaw Episode 118: Understanding the Intersection Between Autism and LGBTQIA with Dr. Laurie Stephens Episode 119: Autistic Girls – Overlooked and Underrecognized with Megan Beardmore, PhD, NCSP Episode 63: Supporting Youth with Autism and ADHD with Holly Blanc Moses Connect with Dr. Blied: Dr. Blied’s WebsiteDr. Blied’s Mental Health BlogYouTube Channeldrblied@drblied.com Connect with Us: Get on our Email ListBook a ConsultationGet Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:40:23

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Ep. 184: Could Pathological Demand Avoidance Clarify My Child’s Challenges? with Dr. Casey Ehrlich

5/7/2024
Some parents may describe their child as very strong-willed. That child may show an extreme avoidance of everyday demands, expectations, and requests. But what if the behaviors are not an indication of strong will, but rather occur because a child feels overwhelmed by demands and perceives them as threats to their autonomy and self-control? Are there specific strategies that would be helpful when raising a demand-avoidant child or teen? Today, we’re going to be talking about Pathological Demand Avoidance with Dr. Casey Ehrlich. She is the CEO and founder of At Peace Parents where she specializes in teaching parents and therapists practical skills in the home or clinical setting to accommodate neuroception-driven demand avoidance and nervous system differences through creative techniques. Show Notes: [3:10] - Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA) is considered a nervous system disability. Dr. Ehrlich explains why this is and shares alternative names for it.[5:41] - Many parents and clinicians have found that the strategies they have tried have not worked or made things worse.[7:39] - Dr. Ehrlich describes a recent situation with her son that demonstrates sudden nervous system activation in PDA.[9:33] - We need to understand the root cause of behaviors that are interfering with your ability to connect with your child.[10:57] - PDA may show up as a regression or can surround a primary need.[12:58] - PDA is often misunderstood.[15:04] - With a background as a social scientist, Dr. Ehrlich explains some of the research about PDA and why many children and teens are not correctly identified.[17:45] - Accommodations include autonomy, equality, trauma-informed play, nervous system signals of safety, communication, lowering demands, humor, novelty, and more.[21:38] - PDA is happening on a subconscious level. It isn’t about emotions.[23:37] - It can be confusing as a child gets older because they do begin using social strategies and we may not see escalation as nervous system dysregulation.[27:46] - Pausing to de-escalate is crucial.[29:24] - Is PDA only seen in people with autism?[30:42] - Connections can only be made when PDAers feel a sense of safety.[33:21] - Awareness is the first step.[35:55] - Dr. Ehrlich learned more about PDA as a mother than a clinician.[40:41] - Dr. Ehrlich hosted a podcast calledPDA Parentswhere she talks about her experiences across eight episodes. She also hosts the At Peace Parents Podcast. About Our Guest: Casey Ehrlich, Ph.D. (she/her) is a social scientist, parent coach, and educator, and the CEO and founder of At Peace Parents. Casey brings 15 years of work experience and expertise in social science methodology to help parents and therapists understand how to connect with and accommodate PDA Autistic children. She is currently working on empirical research with the University of Michigan Medical School on Pathological Demand Avoidance in children and teens. Connect with Dr. Ehrlich: At Peace Parents on Instagram Dr. Casey Ehrlich on YouTubeEmail:cehrlich@atpeaceparents.com Links and Related Resources: Free Clarity Masterclass Connect with Us: Get on our Email ListBook a ConsultationGet Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS ProviderRegister for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc. or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:48:51

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Ep. 183: Unlocking Potential: A Dyslexia Journey with Rosalin Abigail Kyere-Nartey

4/30/2024
Welcome to today's episode, where we turn the spotlight to dyslexia awareness and advocacy, featuring the remarkable journey of Rosalin Abigail Kyere-Nartey. Rosalin's story is nothing short of inspiring as she navigates her own experience with dyslexia to become an advocate for change for dyslexic individuals across Africa and beyond. From struggling in academics to finding her passion in culinary school, Rosalin's personal journey highlights the importance of understanding and embracing neurodiversity. Through her organization, the Africa Dyslexia Organization (ADO), Rosalin is making an impact on dyslexia awareness, advocacy, and support. However, there are many barriers, including societal beliefs in African countries and lack of teacher resources. In this episode, Rosalin shares her own struggles and triumphs with dyslexia, including the pivotal moments that brought dyslexia to her own awareness and understanding. Rosalin's dedication to raising awareness and providing essential tools for educators and parents is truly inspiring and much needed in a world where dyslexia continues to be misunderstood. Show Notes: About Our Guest: Rosalin Abigail Kyere-Nartey Rosalin is an unwavering advocate for dyslexic individuals and the Founder and Executive Director of Africa Dyslexia Organization (ADO), non-profit organization is dedicated to raising awareness, advocacy, providing essential educational tools to teachers and parents, and offering support for individuals grappling with dyslexia and related learning disabilities. Rosalin holds an MSc in International Hospitality Management from Swiss Hotel Management School in Switzerland. She is Walt Disney Hospitality Leadership Fellow and currently a Lead Consultant at iQ Mundo and Country Rep for Swiss Education Group in Ghana, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Her multifaceted expertise and her commitment to inclusive education position her as a beacon of hope, igniting positive change for dyslexic individuals across Africa. Connect with Rosalin: Rosalin@africandyslexia.orgAfrica Dyslexia Website Links and Related Resources: Register for Our Self-Paced Dyslexia Mini CourseDyslexia Episode 37: Literacy - A Social Justice Issue with Resha Conroy Episode 36: Empowering Professionals and Caregivers to Improve the Lives of Children Around the World with Sandy Dorsey Episode 111: Overcoming Dyslexia and Addressing the Reading Crisis with Sally Shaywitz Connect with Us: Get on our Email ListBook a ConsultationGet Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:33:38

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Ep. 182: How to Support Emotionally Intense Children with Samantha Moe

4/23/2024
Today, we're digging into the complex and often challenging world of parenting emotionally intense children. I'm thrilled to introduce our special guest, Samantha Moe, a certified parent coach and speaker who brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to the table. Samantha's work is nothing short of amazing, providing invaluable support and guidance to parents navigating the complexities of raising emotionally intense children. In this episode, Samantha sheds light on the intricacies of parenting emotionally intense children and shares practical strategies to help parents navigate this often overwhelming journey. From understanding the underlying reasons behind behavioral dysregulation to fostering a supportive home environment, Samantha offers actionable advice, including exercises and reflection questions, that will resonate with parents facing similar challenges. So, if you're a parent seeking support and guidance in raising emotionally intense children, you won't want to miss this conversation. Get ready to gain a deeper understanding of your child's needs and discover effective strategies to support them on their journey towards emotional regulation and wellbeing. Show Notes: [2:41] - While there are a lot of resources out there to help parents and families, that doesn’t make it easy.[3:48] - Samantha shares a bit about her background and how she realized that she had not been prepared to help emotionally intense children.[5:24] - Oftentimes when parents see behavioral deregulation, they want to make it stop. But we have to understand why children are behaving this way.[6:59] - Samantha takes a look at the parent-child relationship from the parent’s side of things and the home environment. She demonstrates an exercise.[10:41] - We have mirror neurons that reflect the state another person is in. If a child is emotionally intense, we feel their stress.[12:16] - If you want to lower your child’s stress, you have to also lower the fight and flight in your own brain.[14:51] - If you can label a child’s emotion in the moment, it helps them feel seen and heard.[16:50] - There are variations in acknowledging an emotion based on the situation and the age of the child.[18:40] - Parents make mistakes, but there are some common mistakes with emotionally intense children. Samantha provides some reflection questions.[22:07] - Parents need to also practice changing their own behavior to help calm their children.[25:00] - Reflect back on your own upbringing. Were your emotions labeled and regulated?[27:10] - Emotional intensity is not exclusive to autistic children.[29:40] - Samantha describes the pillars she uses to teach and support parents.[31:41] - Parents need to feel supported. A parent’s mental health and well-being impact that of their children. About Our Guest: Certified parent coach and speaker Samantha Moe has coached parents on how to help their children calm, connect, and cooperate since 2004. She now provides continuing education, advanced training, and parent coach certification for family service professionals who support intense kids and their families. Samantha is the creator of the Mad to Glad Blueprint, a revolutionary brain-and-nervous-system-based approach to positive communication and parenting that soothes and even prevents intense kids’ most challenging behaviors. She holds a Master’s degree in Communication Disorders from the University of Minnesota and has interdisciplinary training in sensory integration, play therapy, and emotional integration. Connect with Samantha Moe: Samantha Moe’s WebsiteEmail:hello@samanthamoe.com Links and Related Resources: Episode 72: Prioritizing Co-Regulation and Self-Regulation in Communication with Danielle G. Kent Episode 45: How Sensory Processing Impacts Communication with Jessie L. Ginsburg Episode 140: 10 Ways Parents Can Support Their Child’s Mental Health Over the Summer Connect with Us: Get on our Email ListBook a ConsultationGet Support and Connect with a...

Duration:00:37:06

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Ep. 181: Youth Anxiety: How Parents Can Help with Dr. Elizabeth Karp

4/16/2024
Welcome back to the Diverse Thinking Different Learning Podcast. Today, we're diving into a crucial topic that affects families worldwide: childhood anxiety. Joining us is Dr. Elizabeth Karp, a licensed clinical child psychologist and adjunct lecturer at Stanford University School of Medicine. With her expertise in evidence-based interventions for ADHD, anxiety, and autism spectrum disorder, Dr. Karp provides invaluable insights into supporting children and families facing these challenges. In this episode, we're building on our previous discussions about childhood anxiety, delving deeper into its prevalence and impact. Dr. Karp highlights the importance of recognizing signs of anxiety in children, such as changes in behavior and social withdrawal. We'll explore how anxiety affects not only the child but also the entire family dynamic. Dr. Karp shares practical strategies for parents, including the SPACE program, which empowers families to navigate anxiety together. From understanding the role of parental involvement to implementing supportive techniques, this conversation offers valuable guidance for parents and families who want to help their children and might not know where to begin. Show Notes: About Our Guest: Dr. Elizabeth Karp is a licensed clinical child psychologist and an adjunct lecturer at Stanford University in the school of medicine. She provides evidence-based interventions, including cognitive behavioral therapy, for children and families with concerns related to ADHD, anxiety, and autism spectrum disorder. She has a particular expertise in working with parents to support their children with these areas of concern. Connect with Dr. Elizabeth Karp: ChildNEXUS Provider Profiledrkarp@drelizabethkarp.comDr. Elizabeth Karp’s Website Links and Related Resources: Episode 67: Your Child’s Anxiety: When to Worry with Dr. John Piacentini Episode 131: Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Kids and Teens with Dr. Shadab JannatiSPACE Treatment Website Connect with Us: Get on our Email ListBook a ConsultationGet Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS ProviderRegister for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses on Youth Anxiety The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:33:29

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Ep. 180: 6 Fundamental Habits for Better Sleep with Dr. Funke Afolabi-Brown

4/9/2024
Welcome back to another discussion about sleep! We've previously delved into why sleep is crucial for our well-being, and today, we're taking it a step further. In this episode, we'll explore practical strategies that you can implement at home to ensure that not only our children are getting good quality sleep, but the whole family. Joining me is Dr. Afolabi-Brown, a triple board-certified sleep medicine physician and pediatric pulmonologist, who will guide us through the science of sleep and offer invaluable tips to improve sleep quality for neurodivergent children and their families. To help families establish healthy sleep habits, Dr. Afolabi-Brown introduces the CREATE acronym, outlining six fundamental strategies for good sleep hygiene: Consistency, Routines, Environment, Assigned bed for sleep, Technology management, and Elimination of disruptions. You will also hear real-life success stories of families who have implemented these strategies and witnessed remarkable improvements in sleep quality. Whether you're a parent, caregiver, or simply interested in optimizing sleep for yourself or loved ones, this episode is a valuable resource to transform your sleep habits and promote overall well-being. Show Notes: About Our Guest: Dr. Funke Afolabi-Brown is a triple board-certified sleep medicine physician and pediatric pulmonologist. She founded RestfulSleepMD, where she helps high-achieving professionals and their children change their relationship with sleep so they can move from being drained and exhausted to thriving in their families, careers, and relationships. She achieves this through clinical practice (The Restful Sleep Place), coaching, speaking, and organization consultation. She is a best-selling author and has been featured on various media outlets, including ABC. She obtained her sleep medicine training at the University of Pennsylvania and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Connect with Dr. Funke Afolabi-Brown: The Restful Sleep Place Website@restfulsleepmd on InstagramDr. Funke Afolabi-Brown on LinkedInDr. Funke Brown on YouTube Links and Related Resources: Episode 148: How Sleep Affects Academic Performance and Mood 5 Reasons Sleep Matters for Children 8 Ways Teenagers Suffer When They Don’t Get Enough Sleep Episode 160: The Sleep Deprived Teen with Lisa Lewis Connect with Us: Get on our Email ListBook a ConsultationGet Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS ProviderRegister for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses for ADHD, Dyslexia and Youth Anxiety The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:34:13

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Ep. 179: How to Empower Black Neurodivergent Learners with Jason B. Allen

4/2/2024
Welcome to today's episode where we are tackling the important topic of empowering black neurodivergent learners and connecting with their community. Our guest, Jason B. Allen, National Director of Partnerships for the National Parents Union, brings over 19 years of experience in education to the table. Through his work, Jason advocates for inclusive and supportive environments that uplift students, families, and communities. In our conversation, Jason sheds light on the stigma surrounding learning disabilities and shares his personal journey as both an educator and a student with exceptionalities. He emphasizes the importance of amplifying voices and fostering parent and family engagement in education. Jason highlights the need for dedicated educators who recognize issues and work towards practical solutions. We discuss the significance of community engagement and the role it plays in shaping school culture. Jason emphasizes the need for intentional partnerships and resources to support educators and empower students. Through his work with the National Parents Union, Jason advocates for informed decision-making and inclusive educational practices. Join us as we explore actionable strategies to create inclusive learning environments and empower black neurodivergent learners. From promoting family engagement to fostering community partnerships, this episode provides valuable insights to drive positive change in education. Show Notes: About Our Guest: Jason B. Allen is the National Director of Partnerships for the National Parents Union. His work resides in the Organizing and Partnership Department where his focus is on elevating partnerships, programs and campaigns amplifying parent voices. He has worked in education for over 19 years as a teacher, administrator and leader serving students, families and communities. As a long time storyteller, Jason shares his experiences through his company, educational entities, llc and helps others develop their stories through digital storytelling including podcasting, blogging, advocacy and other public speaking platforms. His life work is centered on his family’s foundation, Lillie’s Foundation, supporting grandparents and seniors raising school aged children. He is a longtime advocate for male engagement helping found Black Males with Initiative in 2001 and continuing this work throughout his professional career. His first book, Suits, Swagg and Success shares his experiences, strategies and solutions to engaging Black males. Connect with Jason: National Parents Union Website Work with NPUjason@npunion.org Links and Related Resources: The Educator’s Voice BlogLillie’s Foundation for Change Episode 132: Social Justice - A Framework for Equity in Education with Charles A. Barrett Fostering Social Justice in Our Youth Episode 37: Literacy - A Social Justice Issue with Resha Conroy Episode 3: Neuropsychological Evaluations Through a Cultural Lens with Dr. India Fernandez Connect with Us: Get on our Email ListBook a ConsultationGet Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS ProviderRegister for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:43:36

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Ep. 178: Key Skills Kids Need to Thrive in Middle School and Beyond with Phyllis L. Fagell, LCPC

3/26/2024
Welcome to a crucial conversation that strikes a chord with every parent of a middle schooler (myself included!), and even more so for those navigating the unique challenges of children who think and learn differently. Today, we're joined by the amazing Phyllis Fagell, whose focus and expertise are on guiding children through the tumultuous middle school years. Middle school isn't just a phase to endure; it's a pivotal time that sets the stage for future success. Phyllis shares invaluable insights into why middle school matters and how parents can empower their children not just to survive but to thrive during this critical period. From tackling homework struggles and managing distractions to understanding the complexities of social dynamics, this discussion with Phyllis in addition to her books, supports parents in setting their middle schooler up for success. So, whether you're a seasoned parent seeking new strategies or braving the middle school journey for the first time, this episode will help transform the way you navigate this transformative time with your child. Show Notes: About Our Guest: Phyllis L. Fagell is a licensed mental health therapist and certified school counselor in Maryland. She's the author of Middle School Matters: The 10 Key Skills Kids Need to Thrive in Middle School and Beyond – and How Parents Can Help and Middle School Superpowers: Raising Resilient Tweens in Turbulent Times. Phyllis also is a frequent contributor to The Washington Post and other national publications, including CNN and U.S. News & World Report, and her ideas have been shared in outlets including The New York Times, The Atlantic, The New Yorker, The Chicago Tribune, and NPR. Phyllis lives in Bethesda, Maryland with her husband and three children. Connect with Phyllis: Phyllis L. Fagell’s Website Middle School Matters: The 10 Key Skills Kids Need to Thrive in Middle School and Beyond – and How Parents Can Help by Phyllis L. Fagell Middle School Superpowers: Raising Resilient Tweens in Turbulent Times by Phyllis L. Fagell Links and Related Resources: 4 Ways Parents Can Reframe a Tween or Teen’s Social Setbacks Episode 107: How to Motivate Kids Who Couldn’t Care Less with Dr. Ellen Braaten Episode 56: The Disintegrating Student with Dr. Jeannine Jannot Congruence App (free trial): Congruence is a self-coaching tool to help teens thrive in academics, sports, and social situations. Email service@congruence.app and mention Diverse Thinking Different Learning in the subject line for access. Connect with Us: Get on our Email ListBook a ConsultationGet Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS ProviderRegister for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:33:40

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Ep. 177: How Understanding the Adolescent Brain Helps Us Better Support Teens

3/19/2024
Adolescence is a pivotal time in a young person’s life. The adolescent brain, while it has developed in size, is not done growing and changing. In this episode, I explore the complexities of neurodiversity between biology and experience in shaping the developmental journey of neurodivergent youth. It's time to challenge conventional narratives surrounding developmental conditions and embrace a more inclusive approach rooted in developmental diversity. Throughout this episode, we'll uncover strategies to empower young people who learn and think differently, shedding light on the unique challenges and vulnerabilities they face during adolescence. We can support teens through these years of big emotions, impulsiveness, and vulnerability on top of the increasing academic and societal pressures they face as they navigate their development into adulthood. Show Notes: [1:40] - The adolescent brain is not the same as an adult brain. [3:35] - What is pruning and why is it an important component of brain development? [4:43] - Many parents struggle to understand the emotions and impulsiveness of their teenagers. [6:05] - The developmental process is not uniform. [7:09] - Adolescence is also a time of vulnerabilities, particularly for neurodivergent youth. [8:06] - Due to brain development, teens will also respond to stress differently from adults. [9:11] - There are things that can help support brain development like exercise and prioritizing sleep. [11:02] - Everyone’s brain works in different ways. Teens need to understand this as their own brain is developing. [12:27] - Continued support, particularly in areas such as executive functioning, is essential as teens transition into adulthood. Links and Related Resources: The Teen Brain: 6 Things to Know Anxiety and Depression in Adolescents Episode 160: The Sleep Deprived Teen with Lisa Lewis Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:13:55

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Ep. 176: Does Your Child Need an Academic Success Playbook? with Jacqueline Olivier

3/12/2024
Many families struggle knowing what to do when their child or teen suddenly starts failing school and academics or lacks motivation to learn. These challenges can be difficult to navigate as a parent, especially for a parent of a neurodivergent child. Today’s guest has an incredible resource that turns this challenge into an opportunity for parents and families. Dr. Jacqueline Olivier is the founder of Blue Marble Learning Center and she has created an Academic Success Playbook. This isn’t a one-size-fits-all guide. These are personalized and customized guides based on the learning needs of the student and what type of support the parents and families need. Not only that, but these playbooks are interactive and include referrals and even more resources to give parents the information and support they need to help their children thrive. In today’s episode, Jacqueline explains how the playbook works, what she takes into account when customizing them for students, and how impactful they have been for neurodivergent children and their families. Show Notes: [2:34] - Jacqueline explains what she does in her role at Blue Marble Learning Center. [3:57] - We see the best outcomes when a team of people works together to help the student. [5:06] - The most impactful part of Jacqueline’s work is helping students understand how they learn. [7:15] - Parents don’t have a guide for parenting and helping their children. And for neurodivergent children, they have to help them navigate a world that was not built for them. [8:49] - Many times, parents see the results of an evaluation and they think the diagnosis is the golden ticket. Jacqueline explains this gap. [11:20] - What does a success playbook look like? Jacqueline designs these for parents after a diagnosis. It is an individualized and interactive document. [13:55] - Jacqueline describes a scenario with a student who benefited by having a playbook. [17:50] - Every parent’s situation is different. Some will be able to dive into understanding their diagnosis and some will not be able to. The playbook is customized per family. [22:35] - The playbook also gives parents and families an awareness and understanding of what to expect in the school environment and personalized strategies. [26:06] - Jacqueline creates a personalized playbook and provides more resources and referrals for parents and families. [31:02] - When Jacqueline began offering academic playbooks, she learned just how needed this resource is. About Our Guest: Dr. Jacqueline Olivier is the founder of Blue Marble Learning Center. She has an extensive background in educational therapy, working with neurodivergent students, curriculum design, teaching, consulting, instructional leadership, and senior administration in independent and start-up schools. Jacqueline’s areas of expertise include working with children and teens who have been diagnosed with dyslexia, ADHD, Asperger’s, language-based learning disabilities, test-taking anxiety, academic anxiety, dyscalculia, processing disorders, and executive functioning challenges. She provides academic support in mathematics, writing, entrance exams (ISEE, SAT), college essays, and other subjects. Connect with Jacqueline Olivier: ChildNEXUS Provider Profile Blue Marble Learning and Consulting Email bluemarblelc@gmail.com Connect with Us: Get on our Email List Book a Consultation Get Support and Connect with a ChildNEXUS Provider Register for Our Self-Paced Mini Courses with LIVE AMA Sessions The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Duration:00:34:59

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Ep. 175: How to Support Students Who Struggle with Writing with Shanna Trombetta

3/5/2024
When it comes to writing, there is so much happening behind the scenes. It is so much more than sitting down, grabbing a pencil, and putting words on paper. In today's episode, we'll explore the challenges students face when it comes to writing. From motor skills to executive functioning, today’s guest explains the complexities of the writing process. Shanna Trombetta is an Educational Therapist and she joins the Diverse Thinking Different Learning Podcast to help us better understand not only the writing process and the challenges students face, but also ways we can support struggling students at home and in the classroom. She shares practical strategies and insights to empower parents and educators in guiding children through the whirlwind of creativity, skill, and determination that is writing. Show Notes: [3:16] - A lot of learners who come into Shanna’s practice struggle with writing. [4:24] - Shanna describes some of the things that are commonly a struggle when it comes to writing. There’s so much happening at one time. [5:39] - It is common for students to have a lot of great ideas, but the mechanics of writing hold them up, and they wind up not writing anything. [7:32] - One way to support kids with writing is by providing them with a structure. [9:37] - People who don’t struggle with executive functioning can typically create their own structure. But many kids need to be shown how to organize their information. [11:24] - When she works with students, Shanna helps them develop and use tools. [13:08] - What is background knowledge and why is it important for writing? [15:01] - Shanna describes writing around themes to help with structure. [16:57] - Chunking is a great strategy that helps students take one step at a time. [19:01] - Keeping a checklist as they write is another tool that can alleviate the stress of keeping track of things in their mind. [21:00] - Assessment data is really helpful for Shanna so she knows to target some of the spelling patterns that are a challenge for a student. [23:16] - So often students know what they want to write about. Strategies to get the information out are not “cheating.” [26:22] - Writing is an area where many students experience stress. Make it fun. [28:30] - While struggling, it is hard to remain motivated. Shanna shares some ways to keep students positive while they’re learning. About Our Guest: Shanna Trombetta is an Educational Therapist affiliated with the Association of Educational Therapists, dedicated to serving the community of Los Angeles. Shanna holds a Master's in Educational Psychology and a B.A. in Special Education/Psychology from Marist College. Additionally, she holds an Educational Therapy Certification from UC Riverside, a CLEAR credential from the California Commission of Teacher Credentialing (grades K-6), and CLAD certification. She serves on the International Dyslexia Association Chapter of Los Angeles Board and is a Child Nexus member. With a rich background spanning over two decades, Shanna has excelled as a classroom teacher, literacy coach, private homeschool educator, and currently, as an Educational Therapist, offering a depth of expertise in her private practice. Specializing in supporting neurodiverse children, addressing dyslexia, and navigating language-based disabilities, Shanna is unwavering in her dedication to creating inclusive and effective learning environments. In her free time, Shanna treasures moments spent with her two daughters, husband, and Australian labradoodle. A passionate book enthusiast, she often finds solace at the beach with a captivating read. Connect with Our Guest: ChildNEXUS Provider Profile Trombetta Therapy Website Email: shanna@trombettatherapy.com Links and Related Resources: Ready, Set, Write! Engaging Reluctant Students Writing Disorders in Children: The Language Link Coping with Executive Function Deficits in the Context of Writing Assistive Technology for Students with Learning...

Duration:00:32:02