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Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.

Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.
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United States

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Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.

Language:

English


Episodes

Myanmar and the Plight of the Rohingya, with Elliott Prasse-Freeman

11/16/2018
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The Rohingya are seen as fundamentally 'other,' says Prasse-Freeman. "Hence, even if they have formal citizenship, they wouldn't really be accepted as citizens, as full members of the polity." Could Aung San Suu Kyi have done more to prevent the persecution? How important was the hate speech on Facebook? How can the situation be resolved? Don't miss this informative and troubling conversation.

Duration:00:38:47

Global Ethics Weekly: The Right to Science, with Helle Porsdam

11/15/2018
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The right to benefit from scientific progress was enshrined in the United Nations' 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, explains University of Copenhagen's Professor Helle Porsdam. Unfortunately, many people, including scientists and policymakers, don't know much about it. How was the right to science developed? What are examples? And, with an anti-science administration in the White House today, what are the contentious issues?

Duration:00:34:06

Internet Trolls in the U.S. and Mexico, with Saiph Savage

11/14/2018
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Professor Saiph Savage is an activist scholar and technology expert who is using large-scale data to study the sophisticated ways in which trolls target certain groups and bombard them with misinformation--for example U.S. Latinos were targeted in the 2018 midterm elections as were Mexicans in their 2018 presidential election. But her message is one of hope. In Mexico, citizens eventually saw through misinformation campaigns and others can too.

Duration:00:42:30

Enemy of the People: Trump's War on the Press, with Marvin Kalb

11/12/2018
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Trump has a love-hate relationship with the press, which he calls "the enemy of the people" when it crosses him, knowing nothing of the origins of the phrase, says Marvin Kalb. Yet the pillars of democracy are the sanctity of the court and the freedom of the press. "I think that President Trump—not wittingly, unwittingly—is moving this nation away from our common understanding of democracy toward something that edges toward authoritarianism."

Duration:00:55:39

A Savage Order, with Rachel Kleinfeld

11/9/2018
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Can violent societies get better? Rachel Kleinfeld discusses her latest book, "A Savage Order: How the World's Deadliest Countries Can Forge a Path to Security." Her conclusion is ultimately optimistic: Though it's never easy, real democracy (not autocracy in disguise) and a vibrant middle class can provide a path out of violence.

Duration:00:38:39

China Steps Out, with Joshua Eisenman

11/2/2018
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In this illuminating conversation, China scholar Joshua Eisenman discusses his two latest books: "Red China's Green Revolution," which overturns the conventional wisdom (both in China and abroad) that Chairman Mao's commune system was a failure; and a co-edited volume "China Steps Out," which explains why for China (unlike the United States), developing regions are a cornerstone of its foreign policy.

Duration:00:31:26

Global Ethics Weekly: Climate Change Mitigation & Governance, with C2G2's Janos Pasztor

11/1/2018
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As activists, politicians, and environmentalists come to terms with a dire report on global warming from the UN's IPCC, Janos Pasztor, executive director of the Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative (C2G2), remains focused on the governance of the potential use of climate change "mitigation" technologies. What do these discussions look like in China? What do smaller countries think? And how challenging is it that climate change remains a political divisive issue in the U.S.?

Duration:00:35:46

The Alternatives to War: From Sanctions to Nonviolence, with James Pattison

10/29/2018
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In this interview with the Council's John Krzyzaniak, James Pattison (University of Manchester, UK), discusses his book, "The Alternatives to War." Taking what he calls a "pragmatic approach," Pattison outlines seven sets of alternatives, including economic sanctions and positive incentives. His goal is to offer policymakers a moral map of the main alternatives to war, thinking through the considerations for each one.

Duration:00:27:31

Reckless: Henry Kissinger and the Tragedy of Vietnam, with Robert K. Brigham

10/26/2018
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Henry Kissinger is smart, charming, and a great writer, says historian Robert Brigham. But when it came to Vietnam, his arrogance and deceit made a bad situation worse. Kissinger altered the logbooks for military bombings and misled the president on the content of the secret talks in Paris. "He was a theorist who stuck to theorist dreams, and it cost the country dearly." What are the lessons for today's administration?

Duration:01:01:18

Global Ethics Weekly: Youth Unemployment & Refugees in the Middle East & North Africa, with Mariel Davis

10/25/2018
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The Middle East and North Africa has a huge youth and young adult population--65 percent of the people in the region are under 30--but unfortunately unemployment among this group remains high. Education for Employment's Mariel Davis details how the organization is working to change this. She also discusses the challenges facing refugees, with a focus on Jordan.

Duration:00:34:55

Wellbeing in Northern Ireland, 20 Years After the Good Friday Agreement, with Senator George J. Mitchell

10/22/2018
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"Much has been said and written about the long and difficult road that led us to the Agreement in April of 1998. Many have deservedly received credit for their roles, but the real heroes of the Agreement were the people and the political leaders of Northern Ireland," declares Senator George Mitchell, who played a leading role in the Belfast Good Friday Agreement. Don't miss this moving and very personal speech.

Duration:00:23:23

Fight for Liberty, with Max Boot, Philip Bobbitt, Garry Kasparov, & Bret Stephens

10/19/2018
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We live in a time when liberal democracy is on the defensive, not only in the U.S. but around the world. Yet these speakers, whose roots reflect the political spectrum, are optimistic that having a fresh discussion on moral values and basic principles such as freedom of speech, a free press, and the rule of law can help bring democracy back to health. Don't miss this valuable discussion.

Duration:00:59:58

Global Ethics Weekly: Science Fiction, Micro-democracy, & Information, with Malka Older

10/18/2018
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Malka Older has spent time as an aid worker in Darfur, Indonesia, and Japan, as was discussed in last week's podcast, but she also has another role: science fiction novelist. Her latest book, "State Tectonics," is the third in a series that explores the concepts of "micro-democracy" and a "global information management bureacracy" in the near future. How have separatists from East Timor to Catalonia influenced Older's novels?

Duration:00:28:25

The Nationalist Revival: Trade, Immigration, and the Revolt Against Globalization, with John B. Judis

10/16/2018
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Why has nationalism suddenly returned with a vengeance around the world? Why are nationalists so angry about free trade and immigration? Why has globalization become a dirty word? In this insightful talk, John B. Judis has some answers to these questions--and prescriptions for the United States.

Duration:01:00:05

Global Ethics Weekly: Disaster Response & Ethics, with Malka Older

10/11/2018
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Former Senior Fellow Malka Older, a novelist and aid worker, details the ethical and logistical sides of disaster response, drawing on her experiences in Sri Lanka, Fukushima, and Darfur. Why are "rich" countries sometimes less prepared to handle earthquakes and hurricanes? How is disaster response different in the United States? And with Hurricane Michael affecting millions this week, what are some practical ways to help?

Duration:00:32:24

The Future of U.S. National Security, with Derek Reveron

10/10/2018
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"Is it still fair to say there are continuities in foreign policy two years into the Trump administration? I'm going to say yes, and I'll offer some evidence," declares Derek S. Reveron of the U.S. Naval War College and Harvard Kennedy School. Don't miss this expert analysis of America's role in the world.

Duration:01:03:08

Chinese and Russian "Political Warfare" with Tom Mahnken and Toshi Yoshihara

10/9/2018
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Tom Mahnken and Toshi Yoshihara of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments (CSBA) discuss China and Russia's "authoritarian political warfare." "Not only do they use these influence campaigns, they use economic coercion, occasionally they use a military force, they use non-military instruments of power," says Yoshihara. "And it's the combination of these tools that I think make Russian and Chinese strategy so potent."

Duration:00:43:05

An Update on Pakistan, with Ahmed Rashid

10/5/2018
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Acclaimed journalist Ahmed Rashid discusses Pakistan's new populist prime minister, Imran Khan, whom he considers woefully unprepared. He also examines Pakistan's debt-ridden economy and Pakistan's complex relationships with China, India, the U.S., Afghanistan, and the Taliban. "I think the key thing to understand is the need to follow Afghanistan," he says. "Whatever happens in Pakistan will depend on what happens in Afghanistan."

Duration:00:17:01

Global Ethics Weekly: Statelessness & Ethnonationalism in India & the U.S., with Kavitha Rajagopalan

10/4/2018
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Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan explains the troubling situation in Northeast India near the border with Bangladesh, where millions of citizens could end up stateless. With denaturalization increasing exponentially under the Trump administration, what are the parallels with what's happening in the United States? Is this all due to the rise of ethnonationalism in both countries?

Duration:00:30:58

Mass Detentions in Xinjiang, China, with Francisco Bencosme

10/3/2018
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According to a recent Amnesty International Report, Uyghurs, Kazakhs, and other predominantly Muslim ethnic groups in China's Xinjiang Autonomous Region are the targets of surveillance, arbitrary detention, and forced indoctrination by the Chinese government. Up to 1 million Uyghurs have been detained, says Amnesty's Francisco Bencosme. There are parallels with the Rohingya crisis, yet there has been far less international outcry.

Duration:00:20:45