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New Thinking, a Center for Court Innovation Podcast

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The Center for Court Innovation is a non-profit think tank based in New York that helps the justice system aid victims, reduce crime, and improve public trust in justice. Every day, the Center works with people who are making a difference on the ground--police chiefs testing new approaches to local crime, prosecutors experimenting with alternative sanctions, judges looking for new solutions to complex problems. NEW THINKING introduces listeners to the best and the brightest in the field: practitioners and academics who are spearheading meaningful justice reforms across the country and around the globe.

The Center for Court Innovation is a non-profit think tank based in New York that helps the justice system aid victims, reduce crime, and improve public trust in justice. Every day, the Center works with people who are making a difference on the ground--police chiefs testing new approaches to local crime, prosecutors experimenting with alternative sanctions, judges looking for new solutions to complex problems. NEW THINKING introduces listeners to the best and the brightest in the field: practitioners and academics who are spearheading meaningful justice reforms across the country and around the globe.
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Location:

United States

Description:

The Center for Court Innovation is a non-profit think tank based in New York that helps the justice system aid victims, reduce crime, and improve public trust in justice. Every day, the Center works with people who are making a difference on the ground--police chiefs testing new approaches to local crime, prosecutors experimenting with alternative sanctions, judges looking for new solutions to complex problems. NEW THINKING introduces listeners to the best and the brightest in the field: practitioners and academics who are spearheading meaningful justice reforms across the country and around the globe.

Language:

English

Contact:

646-386-3100


Episodes

Ending Bail, Closing Rikers: How Change Happens

10/15/2019
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The movements to end cash bail and close jails are connected, and gabriel sayegh has been in the thick of organizing both fights. The co-executive director of the Katal Center for Health, Equity, and Justice explains why he thinks New York’s impending reforms to bail are potentially the most sweeping in the country. And in … Continue reading Ending Bail, Closing Rikers: How Change Happens →

Duration:00:36:33

‘Jail-Attributable Deaths’

9/25/2019
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As chief medical officer for New York City jails, Homer Venters realized early in his tenure that for many people dying in jail, the primary cause of death was jail itself. To document these deaths, Venters and his team created a statistical category no one had dared to track before: “jail-attributable deaths.” His work led … Continue reading ‘Jail-Attributable Deaths’ →

Duration:00:43:36

Art vs. Mass Incarceration

9/4/2019
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Can art transform the criminal justice system? On this special edition of New Thinking, host Matt Watkins sits down with two New York City artists on the rise—Derek Fordjour and Shaun Leonardo—who both work with our Project Reset to provide an arts-based alternative to court and a criminal record for people arrested on a low-level … Continue reading Art vs. Mass Incarceration →

Duration:00:41:03

Beyond the Algorithm: Risk and Race

8/14/2019
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**episode originally aired in October 2018** About two out of three people in local jails are being held awaiting trial, often because they can’t afford bail. What if a mathematical formula could do a more objective job of identifying who could be safely released? That’s the promise of risk assessments. But critics call them “justice … Continue reading Beyond the Algorithm: Risk and Race →

Duration:00:31:08

The Art and Science of Reducing Violence

7/10/2019
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In 2017, more than 17,000 people were murdered in the United States, most of them in cities. Thomas Abt, a long-time policy-maker and researcher, says that far from intractable, there are proven ways to reduce the violence, but he worries the urgency of acting now is being ignored. And when it comes to how we … Continue reading The Art and Science of Reducing Violence →

Duration:00:30:09

Marilyn Mosby, Karl Racine: “We’re Talking About Humans”

6/21/2019
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With so much of the focus now on keeping people out of jail and prison, it can feel like there is a reluctance among criminal justice reformers to work on improving life for the more than two million people already there. But one group beginning to mobilize on the issue is prosecutors—or at least “progressive” … Continue reading Marilyn Mosby, Karl Racine: “We’re Talking About Humans” →

Duration:00:31:37

Prosecutor Power: Scott Hechinger on the Urgency of Reform

6/6/2019
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If you’re not following Scott Hechinger on Twitter, you’re missing something important. A public defender and the director of policy at Brooklyn Defender Services, Hechinger is a fantastic explainer and participant-witness at the frontlines of the justice system. In May 2018, he joined our series on prosecutors, outlining how prosecutor power is exerted at key … Continue reading Prosecutor Power: Scott Hechinger on the Urgency of Reform →

Duration:00:27:15

The Pathological Politics of Criminal Justice

5/22/2019
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Rachel Barkow contends criminal justice policy is a “prisoner of politics,” driven by appeals to voters’ worst instincts and an aversion to evidence of what actually works. Defined by its severity and unfairness, the criminal justice system, she says, is counterproductive to the goal of public safety it claims as its justification. In her new … Continue reading The Pathological Politics of Criminal Justice →

Duration:00:35:31

Emily Bazelon: When Power Shifts

5/1/2019
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The well-known journalist and commentator Emily Bazelon talks about her new book, Charged, on the “movement to transform American prosecution,” and where she thinks power might be shifting in the criminal justice system. So-called progressive prosecutors are very much a minority among elected D.A.s, but what if they could be the model for dismantling what … Continue reading Emily Bazelon: When Power Shifts →

Duration:00:37:33

Misdemeanors Matter #3: Rachael Rollins Reboots Low-Level Justice

4/17/2019
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Rachael Rollins says she has seen the criminal justice system from “almost every angle.” Now, as Boston’s first female African-American district attorney, she’s setting the agenda. She explains her new approach of “services not sentences” as a response to low-level “crimes of poverty” and the urgency of changing the traditional role of the prosecutor. Full … Continue reading Misdemeanors Matter #3: Rachael Rollins Reboots Low-Level Justice →

Duration:00:42:25

New Jails to End All Jails?

3/29/2019
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Rikers Island was once the dream of progressive reformers for a more rehabilitative corrections system. Now New York City, taking advantage of its plunging jail population, has pledged to replace the scandal-plagued complex with four smaller redesigned facilities—located near courthouses, not on an isolated island. It’s a shift the mayor says will end the era … Continue reading New Jails to End All Jails? →

Duration:00:31:36

The Cost of Being Poor? The Fight Against Fines and Fees

3/13/2019
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Almost any encounter with the criminal justice system comes with a price tag, and fines and fees are capturing millions of Americans in a cycle of poverty and justice-involvement. Various states across the country charge you for using a public defender, a DNA sample, your monthly parole meetings, even a jury trial. And that’s in … Continue reading The Cost of Being Poor? The Fight Against Fines and Fees →

Duration:00:35:19

Prosecutor Power #8: What’s Next for Progressive Prosecutors?

2/20/2019
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How can the recent victories of the campaign to elect reform-minded district attorneys be wedded to larger systemic change to ensure the movement’s gains outlast the next election? On the final episode of our Prosecutor Power series, the ACLU’s Somil Trivedi says progressive D.A.s have to take the next step of campaigning to reduce their own … Continue reading Prosecutor Power #8: What’s Next for Progressive Prosecutors? →

Duration:00:27:07

Misdemeanors Matter #2: Alexandra Natapoff on a Legacy of Injustice

2/6/2019
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Alexandra Natapoff calls the misdemeanor justice system a “quiet behemoth”: making up four of every five criminal cases in the U.S., neglected by scholars and reformers, and potentially harming those caught up in it for life. In Punishment Without Crime: How Our Massive Misdemeanor System Traps the Innocent and Makes America More Unequal, she describes … Continue reading Misdemeanors Matter #2: Alexandra Natapoff on a Legacy of Injustice →

Duration:00:37:48

Prosecutor Power #7: Strength in Numbers

1/25/2019
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The movement to elect reform-minded prosecutors has been around long enough and scored enough victories that progressive D.A.s now have their own support network: Fair and Just Prosecution. Miriam Krinsky, its executive director, explains why she thinks “starry-eyed idealists” who want to transform the justice system need to get the message that “the biggest difference … Continue reading Prosecutor Power #7: Strength in Numbers →

Duration:00:27:56

Heal and Punish? When Therapy Is the Alternative to Incarceration

1/9/2019
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How effective is therapy or treatment when it’s used instead of incarceration, and what are the challenges to conducting it inside the coercive context of the criminal justice system? New Thinking host Matt Watkins is joined by clinical psychologist Jacob Ham who works with justice-involved young people affected by trauma, and John Jay College’s Deborah … Continue reading Heal and Punish? When Therapy Is the Alternative to Incarceration →

Duration:00:33:27

Rikers: An American Jail (Best of 2018)

12/26/2018
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Highlights from a public screening and panel discussion of Bill Moyers’s ‘Rikers: An American Jail,’ moderated by New Thinking host, Matt Watkins. Commenting on the film and the future of criminal justice reform are Tina Luongo of the Legal Aid Society, Jill Harris of the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office, and two of the people formerly … Continue reading Rikers: An American Jail (Best of 2018) →

Duration:00:38:08

Prosecutor Power #6: Larry Krasner, The Antagonist

12/12/2018
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As a defense attorney, Larry Krasner sued the Philadelphia police upwards of 75 times. In late 2017, he was elected D.A. in a landslide. As part of our series on the power of prosecutors, Krasner explains why he has little patience for compromise in a city whose justice system is “an outlier in a country … Continue reading Prosecutor Power #6: Larry Krasner, The Antagonist →

Duration:00:38:01

Prosecutor Power #5, Adam Foss: Use Your Power Well

11/28/2018
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In 2016, Adam Foss, a young prosecutor in Boston, gave a TED Talk on reforming his profession that became a sensation. Today he trains incoming prosecutors in D.A. offices across the country. In the latest episode of our series on prosecutors, Foss says the problem isn’t that prosecutors have too much power; it’s that no one … Continue reading Prosecutor Power #5, Adam Foss: Use Your Power Well →

Duration:00:33:34

Race, Trauma, and Healing in Crown Heights, Brooklyn

11/9/2018
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An audio portrait of Make It Happen, our program working with young men of color in Crown Heights, Brooklyn affected by violence. Through interviews with participants and practitioners, the episode explores the intersections of trauma, involvement with the justice system, and the lived experience of race. This episode was originally released in April 2018 and … Continue reading Race, Trauma, and Healing in Crown Heights, Brooklyn →

Duration:00:22:16