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New Thinking, a Center for Court Innovation Podcast

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The Center for Court Innovation is a non-profit think tank based in New York that helps the justice system aid victims, reduce crime, and improve public trust in justice. Every day, the Center works with people who are making a difference on the ground--police chiefs testing new approaches to local crime, prosecutors experimenting with alternative sanctions, judges looking for new solutions to complex problems. NEW THINKING introduces listeners to the best and the brightest in the field: practitioners and academics who are spearheading meaningful justice reforms across the country and around the globe.

The Center for Court Innovation is a non-profit think tank based in New York that helps the justice system aid victims, reduce crime, and improve public trust in justice. Every day, the Center works with people who are making a difference on the ground--police chiefs testing new approaches to local crime, prosecutors experimenting with alternative sanctions, judges looking for new solutions to complex problems. NEW THINKING introduces listeners to the best and the brightest in the field: practitioners and academics who are spearheading meaningful justice reforms across the country and around the globe.
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Location:

United States

Description:

The Center for Court Innovation is a non-profit think tank based in New York that helps the justice system aid victims, reduce crime, and improve public trust in justice. Every day, the Center works with people who are making a difference on the ground--police chiefs testing new approaches to local crime, prosecutors experimenting with alternative sanctions, judges looking for new solutions to complex problems. NEW THINKING introduces listeners to the best and the brightest in the field: practitioners and academics who are spearheading meaningful justice reforms across the country and around the globe.

Language:

English

Contact:

646-386-3100


Episodes

Prosecutor Power #6: Larry Krasner, The Antagonist

12/12/2018
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As a defense attorney, Larry Krasner sued the Philadelphia police upwards of 75 times. Then, in late 2017, he was elected D.A. in a landslide. As part of our series on the power of prosecutors, Krasner describes the reforms he is putting in place, the challenge of ensuring they're actually implemented, and why he has little patience for compromise in a city whose justice system is "an outlier in a country that is an outlier."

Duration:00:38:04

Prosecutor Power #5, Adam Foss: Use Your Power Well

11/28/2018
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In 2016, Adam Foss, a young prosecutor in Boston, gave a TED Talk on reforming his profession that became a sensation. Today he trains incoming prosecutors in D.A. offices across the country. In the latest episode of our series on prosecutors, Foss says the problem isn't that prosecutors have too much power; it's that no one is teaching them to use it for good.

Duration:00:33:34

Race, Trauma, and Healing in Crown Heights, Brooklyn

11/9/2018
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An audio portrait of Make It Happen, our program working with young men of color in Crown Heights, Brooklyn affected by violence. Through interviews with participants and practitioners, the episode explores the intersections of trauma, involvement with the justice system, and the lived experience of race. This episode was originally released in April 2018.

Duration:00:22:16

Misdemeanorland: Social Control and New York City's Lower-Level Courts

10/26/2018
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In Misdemeanorland, Issa Kohler-Hausmann argues the lower courts are no longer primarily concerned with whether people actually committed the offense they’ve been accused of. Instead, the focus is on future behavior: upholding social order through managing and assessing—often over long stretches—everyone with the misfortune of entering Misdemeanorland. It's an argument that forces us to rethink what justice should look like in low-level cases.

Duration:00:29:25

The Most Hot-Button Issue in Criminal Justice Reform?

10/5/2018
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About two out of three people in local jails are being held awaiting trial, often because they can't afford bail. What if a mathematical formula could do a more objective job of identifying who could be safely released? That's the promise of risk assessments. But critics call them "justice by algorithm," and contend they're reproducing the bias inherent to the justice system, only this time under the guise of science.

Duration:00:30:21

Prosecutor Power #4: Kim Foxx, Rooted in Humanity

9/20/2018
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Kim Foxx's unexpected 2016 victory in the race for State's Attorney for Cook County (Chicago) helped to ignite the movement to elect prosecutors promising something other than being "tough on crime." As part of our series on prosecutor power, Foxx explains the reforms she’s put in place, her struggles with being the face of a system that continues to fail so many of her constituents, and offers her take on the “incredible” gains made by the movement to elect a new kind of prosecutor.

Duration:00:46:02

Criminal Justice as Social Justice: A Conversation With Bruce Western

9/6/2018
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Columbia University's Bruce Western, a leading expert on the connection between mass incarceration and poverty, discusses his new book, Homeward: Life in the Year After Prison, and outlines his vision for a justice system rebuilt to respond to the deep deprivation and trauma fueling much of the behaviour that leads to imprisonment.

Duration:00:34:31

Financial Insecurity and Domestic Violence: A Conversation about Child Support

8/22/2018
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For survivors of domestic violence, financial insecurity is often a huge problem. Without money to support themselves and their families, survivors can struggle to gain independence. In this New Thinking podcast, Michael Hayes from the Office of Child Support Enforcement and Krista Del Gallo from the Texas Council on Family Violence talk with Robert V. Wolf about strategies that states and the federal government are promoting to help survivors safely access child support.

Duration:00:24:50

Prosecutor Power #3: Reform From Within—The Brooklyn D.A.

8/8/2018
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Jill Harris says she's "shocked to find myself working for a D.A." A long-time advocate for criminal justice reform, Harris, now the head of the Brooklyn D.A.'s Justice 2020 reform initiative, offers her take on the role of the prosecutor in the third installment of our series on the debate over prosecutor power.

Duration:00:26:23

How the Law Intersects with Everyday Life: Promoting Access to Civil Justice

7/20/2018
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Legal Hand seeks to help people resolve civil justice issues before they need lawyers and court intervention. In our latest New Thinking episode, learn about how the program works, how civil justice issues impact different communities, and why it can be hard to get basic legal information to the people who need it.

Duration:00:41:50

Rikers: An American Jail

7/5/2018
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Highlights from a public screening and panel discussion of Bill Moyers's 'Rikers: An American Jail,' moderated by New Thinking host, Matt Watkins. Commenting on the film and the future of criminal justice reform are Tina Luongo of the Legal Aid Society, Jill Harris of the Brooklyn District Attorney's Office, and two of the people formerly held on Rikers featured in the film: Barry Campbell of the Fortune Society, and Johnny Perez of the National Religious Campaign Against Torture.

Duration:00:35:57

Keeping the Peace: Patrick Sharkey on Sustaining the Great Crime Decline

6/20/2018
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On our New Thinking podcast, Patrick Sharkey, the author of Uneasy Peace: The Great Crime Decline, the Renewal of City Life, and the Next War on Violence, discusses the wider costs of violence and the threat posed by inequality and disinvestment to the current fragile gains. He points to the signal role of community organizing and community-based nonprofits in combating violence and building safer, more resilient cities.

Duration:00:29:25

How Do We Tell What's Working? Disrupting the Justice Evaluation Model

6/6/2018
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Who gets to decide which reforms to the criminal justice system receive the imprimatur of "evidence-based"? To combat what she sees as the monopoly over these decisions created by the high cost of the current evaluation model, Angela Hawken founded BetaGov, offering free and fast evaluations of public policy programs. What is more, as Hawken explains on our New Thinking podcast, the ideas tested generally come from practitioners, or even clients, inside the systems themselves.

Duration:00:19:23

Putting the Public in Public Defending: Standing Up for a Profession in Crisis

5/23/2018
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On our 'New Thinking' podcast, Nashville's top public defender Dawn Deaner explains why she thinks public defending has been "set up to fail" and how working to engage the community—both those who need public defenders and those who never will—is a lifeline for a profession in crisis.

Duration:00:20:25

Prosecutor Power #2: A Public Defender on the Urgency of Reform

5/4/2018
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As part of our podcast series on prosecutor power, Scott Hechinger of Brooklyn Defender Services offers a view from the other side of the adversarial process, discussing prosecutors' impact at key decision-points in his clients' cases and weighing the prospects for reform in a time of increasing scrutiny of prosecutorial discretion.

Duration:00:26:56

Violence, Trauma, and Healing in Crown Heights, Brooklyn

4/19/2018
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On our New Thinking podcast, an audio portrait of Make It Happen, our program working with young men of color in Crown Heights, Brooklyn affected by violence. Through interviews with participants and practitioners, the episode explores the intersections of trauma, involvement with the justice system, and the lived experience of race.

Duration:00:21:25

Prosecutor Power #1: John Pfaff on Mass Incarceration

3/27/2018
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On 'New Thinking,' author John Pfaff outlines his argument for how prosecutors have contributed to mass incarceration and considers how much can be expected from the emerging breed of progressive D.A.'s. This is the first in our podcast series on the power of prosecutors.

Duration:00:24:41

Kansas City Domestic Violence Court: Assessing Risk, Addressing Needs

3/20/2018
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In this New Thinking podcast, Judge Courtney Wachal and Megan Sartin, the offender accountability coordinator, explain the operations of the Kansas City Domestic Violence Court, an Office on Violence Against Women designated mentor court.

Duration:00:17:34

Reducing Incarceration Now: A Conversation About 'Start Here'

3/7/2018
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On our 'New Thinking' podcast, hear from Greg Berman and Julian Adler, the co-authors of our book from the New Press, Start Here: A Road Map to Reducing Mass Incarceration.

Duration:00:26:10

Renewing Justice: When the Library Becomes a Community Court

2/21/2018
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Since 2016, the community court in Eugene, Oregon, has met every week in the downtown library. It's part of an effort getting a lot of attention on the West Coast to bring problem-solving justice to friendlier settings. On our 'New Thinking' podcast, hear about Eugene's success with the new model.

Duration:00:16:23