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Muddy Boots

Health & Wellness Podcasts

Landscape Designer, Keith Edwards, and 'Garden Girl', Elisabeth Kingman, join forces to bring an engaging, informative, and entertaining take on all things gardens. From growing perfect produce to garden design, Keith and Elisabeth will cover it. Come along and get your hands and boots muddy. For more information follow us on Instagram @muddybootspodcast

Location:

Australia

Description:

Landscape Designer, Keith Edwards, and 'Garden Girl', Elisabeth Kingman, join forces to bring an engaging, informative, and entertaining take on all things gardens. From growing perfect produce to garden design, Keith and Elisabeth will cover it. Come along and get your hands and boots muddy. For more information follow us on Instagram @muddybootspodcast

Language:

English


Episodes
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What’s Happening In The Garden In July

7/16/2024
Mid July and half way through Winter. Plenty of jobs to prepare for the Spring season ahead! Get your soil into great shape - add compost (Keith recommends Clyde's Compost), Munash Rock Dust, MycoGold (added at time of planting) and mulch. Add products like Blood & Bone manure and Rooster Booster now as these take some months to take effectGood time to plant and/or fertilise brassicas. Feed with liquid fertliser like Charlie Carp or Power Feed now to optimise growth. Still time to plant cabbages, lettuce, radish, turnips, peas, beans and herbsClean up your tools - scrub off rust, sharpen and treat with VaselinePrune deciduous plants including apple trees by approximately ⅓ . Avoid pruning apricots (this should be done in Summer). Prune to an outward growing bud. Open out centre to allow light and air.Prevent (or treat) pests like aphids and mealybugs with ECO Neem and Eco OilContinue to water your vegetables (depending on rain). Vegetables need 4mm a day!Get on top of weeds while they are growing less vigorously. Keith & Elisabeth love F.D Ryan's Ho-Mi and Collinear tools. Best to do in the low growth period on the Moon calendarOpen up compact soil with F.D Ryan's Broad fork to eliminate algae and mossPerfect time to buy and plant bare-rooted trees (in cooler states). Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:28:03

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Meeting the team from Agrarian Kitchen

7/9/2024
We know from Keith’s Instagram that he visited the Agrarian Kitchen at Willow Court in Tasmania. Today we hear from Rodney Dunn, the brainchild behind the Agrarian Kitchen - a restaurant, cooking school and garden set in New Norfolk, Tasmania. The kitchen garden is at the centre of everything that happens at the Agrarian Kitchen with fresh produce being grown and harvested to support the cooking school, restaurant and function venue set Keith applauds the companion planting approach used in the garden to promote continuity of supply over the year. The 5000m vegetable garden is set in what was an old prison yard. The productive garden is a closed loop system with minimal waste, converting food waste into compost to maximise soil production. Next visit to Tasmania, be sure to treat yourself to a visit to this incredible place Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:24:48

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Question Time 26!

7/2/2024
Q&A time again! Who will be this month’s lucky winner of the fabulous prize donated by The Plant Runner? Unwanted grass coming up in garden beds try either organic Slasher or the less toxic version of Roundup now available called Roundup NaturalNectarine with gumosis seems unusual to Keith! Possibly grafted onto an unsuitable rootstock?Pots with wheels! A great idea to enable moving them around with the seasons. Check out Omnia Plant Gliders. Potting mix should be replaced every 3-5 yearsPruning crepe myrtle - cut back by ⅓ in Winter monthsDahlia tubers only need to be dug up if you are in areas with heavy frosts. Feed with Blood & Bone, Rooster Booster or try Strikeback for OrchidsEscallonia hedge is hardy. Can be cut back hard. Keith suggests aerating the surrounding soil with a broad fork (check out F.D Ryan's)Hedge trimmers - Keith recommends AEG or EGO battery operated modelsKurrajong trees attacked by the Kurrajong Bag Moth won’t usual destroy the tree but where size allows try ECO Neem and Eco OilRose with botrytis? Remove affected leaves/petals and bin them Hydrangea cuttings should be taken late summer for propagationPlanting an Avocado tree? - plant on mound, feed well and mulch with pea straw or lucerne. Plant min 8m from the nearest Eucalyptus tree.Thank you for your great questions again! Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:24:06

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The Landscaping Process

6/25/2024
Landscaping a garden can be overwhelming. Where to start? What to consider? This week, Keith gives us some practical advice. Steps to follow: Start with a ‘wish list’ - consider how you would ideally want to use the space. Do you want a BBQ, a pool, outdoor seating, a pond, vegetable garden etc. Look at the paved areas - do you want decking, paving, granitic sand etc. Start a Pinterest Board can be a great way to explore what you like and compile your ideas.Consider zones including those that you don’t want to be seen (utility area, clothes line etc)Create your plan (or employ a landscape architect), drawing in your structures, paving, decking and plants. Using the council plan of your house and garden will help you work to scale to work out the quantities of what you need - eg for soil, plants etcBefore commencing, existing vegetation will need to be poisoned and remove any unwanted materials. Slasher is an excellent organic herbicideLay down the paving decking etcBring in the soil and additional materials for soil improvement. Soil improvement is the number one factor to growing a healthy, lush garden. Adding Compost, Clyde’s lignite humate to improve the soil and using products like MycoGold will give your plants a great start. Mulch - Keith recommends granitic sand over the top of soil. Irrigation best to go in before the plants. Check out Dan Modular SprinklersPlanting - Autumn when they can get established before the winter.Consider a landscaper to do the initial work of the pathways, decking, soil and irrigation systems if this is too much work. Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:24:08

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Muddy Boots Top 10: Evergreen Trees

6/18/2024
Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:23:22

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Meeting the team from Le Sac

6/11/2024
Struggling to have enough pockets for your secateurs, phone, seed packets etc while you're working in the garden? Well this week we meet Sahra Dixon, who has the solution! Le Sac is a gardening belt designed to be both practical and stylish. Cotton/canvas, machine washable, built for comfort with plenty of pockets for your gardening essentials (even a pocket for your Airpods!). Affordable at $75.95 Find out also about Sahra's other venture - The Wool Shed. The Wool Shed is an intimate, farm-to-table experience, situated on a working farm in Burragate on the far South Coast of New South Wales. Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:17:16

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Question Time 25!

6/4/2024
Q&A time again! Who will be this month’s lucky winner of the fabulous prize donated by The Plant Runner? Lemon tree with droopy branches from so much fruit? 4 stakes and lightly tying the branches to support them, could help here. Alternatively, remove some of the fruitCut flower bed in a raised bed - Keith recommends a wild flower mix. Look at The Seed Collection Direct or pre-propagate in a greenhouse? Check the seed pack. Peas, beans etc can be sown directlyHibiscus rubra with spots and holes. Could be metallic flea beetle. Treat with ECO Neem and Eco Oil (including the soil and under the leaves), also try Diatomaceous Earth or companion planting with fennel or corianderFicus stipulata (pumila or minima) is a great choice for covering a fence where the soil depth is minimalHear about the benefits of Comfrey and the experience at the Garden of St.Earth. Other crops like lucerne, beans, peas and “Clever Clover” also have benefits to the soil.Keith recommends MycoGold - added at time of plantingThank you for your great questions again! Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:16:47

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Citrus Trees from Root Stock

5/28/2024
Citrus trees - a complex and needy tree to grow but worth it when you are well rewarded with abundant fruit. We have regularly discussed their heavy feeding requirements and the long list of pests that can cause problems. Today, instead, we are discussing “root stock”. Grafting is bringing a tree with good root structure together with best the quality and size of fruit. Rootstock is grown then the trunk is cut above the ground and the desired fruiting tree is grafted onto this trunk. The most common root stock is Trifoliata due to its smaller size, disease resistance and tolerance to cold. Troyer is another common rootstock and “Flying Dragon” is another rootstock ideal for pots or smaller spaces due to its slow growing habit. Most rootstocks have a life span of approximately 10 years. Expect to have to replace your tree after this time. Occasionally a rootstock may send up a shoot. This should be removed to ensure it doesn’t dominate the fruiting part of the tree. Citrus care - regular (weekly) deep watering, feed regularly with Neutrog Gyganics or Harry's Citrus Food and regularly spray with a mix of ECO Neem and Eco Oil Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:17:04

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Garden Zones

5/21/2024
Whether you have a large rural garden or a small city balcony, creating “zones” will help you make the most out of the space and optimise its functionality. Hedging is a great way of creating different zonesPlants like Syzygium australe (Straight and Narrow) are perfect for a tall narrow screenGrasses like the giant form of Miscanthus sinesis can be used to divide areasAreas can be divided by using different materials and structures such as concrete reinforcing mesh to grow a creeper on or vertical timber screening that can be softened with plants like Festuca glaucaVarying heights can also enhance a feeling of different rooms or zones. Sunken seating areas, raised garden beds or even raised pools for example (check out Plungie Pools)Garden lighting helps create areas at nightCovered seating/pergola areas - consider a deciduous climber to give shade in summer and light and sun in winterWater features such as birdbaths, fountains, showers add interest and a calming elementPaths link the rooms. Paths can be created using bluestone pavers, concrete pavers, grass, sleepersWhere you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:11:41

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Australian Medicinal Herbs

5/14/2024
Herbs - an essential in every kitchen and a favourite in every garden. This week we talk to Elle from Australian Medicinal Herbs. Hear the story of Elle’s transition from the police force to medicinal herbs. The certified organic Australian Medicinal Herbs grow, process and sell from their farm - “paddock to packet”. A fascinating episode where Elle talks about the workings of their business as well as sharing some tips for the home gardener on using herbs for remedial purposes. Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:18:10

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Question Time 24!

5/7/2024
Q&A time again! Who will be this month’s lucky winner of the fabulous prize donated by The Plant Runner? Granitic sand and Decomposed Gravel - what’s the difference? Granitic sand is crushed rock under 4mm. Keith thinks “Deco Gravel” as the listener refers to, is essentially the same.Carrot seeds where tomatoes have previously been, good or bad? Good! “Carrots love tomatoes”NPK - Potassium helps with flowering and fruiting. Apply organic potassium alongside Munash Rock Dust to improve productivitypH - very Alkaline results. Hear what Keith thinks is going on!Strawberry with a lot of runners and not so much fruit. What’s going on? Use only the first runner (best genetics). Cambridge Rival and Chandler varieties are what Keith would recommend. (refer to our Berry episode on 23.4.24)Repot lemons or put them in the ground? Do either. Remove by tipping on its size and use hose to loosen soil. Either put into the ground (hole twice the size of the root ball or into a pot larger than the last)Roses? Where to buy and what to look for? Look for reputable growers. David Austin roses come with Keith’s recommendationBlack volcanic soil is highly reactive and can crack. Can be improved with addition of Clyde’s lignite and Clyde's Compost. Gypsum and Rooster Booster may help for the lawn in these conditionsWA listener looking for screening plants as a wind break - Keith recommends checking out Domus, Hortbiz and Frenchams. Take a look at their range. Thank you for your great questions again! Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:22:59

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Muddy Boots Top 10: Perennial Plants

4/30/2024
Perennials 30.4.24 With Elisabeth busy with garden and house renovations this week, we have decided to replay one of our listeners favorite episodes. Perennials. Elisabeth thinks these are a “must have” in every garden. What is a perennial? A plant that persists for several years producing stems and flowers and dying back (or becoming dormant) in Winter. Herbaceous perennials completely die back in Winter (like a peony for example). Perennials often have long flowering periods. Cut back before the Autumn Equinox for another flush of flowers. Many perennials are Mediterranean and drought tolerant but there are a huge variety of plants with differing requirements. Numerous online retailers include Woodside Perennials, Woodbridge Perennials, Antique Perennials, Treasured Perennials Top 10 of Elisabeth and Keith, gives us a total of 20 (or 21!). Hydrangea Macrophylla Hydrangea QuercifoliaAlliumSalvia Mystic SpiresSalvia Leucantha including the purple, white velour and pink velour varietiesSedum Autumn JoyAchillea including Moonshine, Terracotta, Cerise Queen, Hela glashoff, ParchmentDigitalis (Foxglove) and DigiplexisLiatris SpicataHelleboreSisyrinchium StriatumGeranium RozanneEchinaceaBuddleia Rudbeckia GoldsturmLavenderHelenium dunkle prachtStachys byzantina (Lambs Ears)Scabiosa MidnightCrepe Myrtle LilacWhere you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:22:04

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Growing Berries

4/23/2024
With Elisabeth busy with garden and house renovations this week, we have decided to replay one of our listeners favorite episodes. Delicious berries. Maybe you already grow your own or maybe you don’t know where to start. This week’s episode looks at 4 main berry types - raspberries, blueberries, blackberries and strawberries Raspberries - 3 types 3 main varieties - Summer fruiting, autumn fruiting and the “dual cropper” - Primo cane cultivars such as ‘Autumn Bliss’, ‘Heritage’, ‘Bogong - suited to warmer or coastal areas (require less chilling to produce new canes) - Floricane are earlier fruiting producing fruit on cane from last year’s growth require a cold winter. Include ‘Chilliwack’, ‘Chilcotin’’Golden Raspberry’. - Dual croppers produce fruit on both old and new canes so have fruit in Summer and Autumn. Include ‘Lloyd George’, ‘Willamette’, Sandford. - Available in Winter as bare-rooted canes or in pots in other seasons. Full Sun Blueberries - Buy in pots - Number of varieties with different climactic requirements. Cold loving varieties include Denise, Northland, Brigitta , Milder areas should look for Sunshine Blue or Blue Rose - Full sun to part shade in slightly acidic soil - Tip prune after fruiting - regular feeding required Blackberries - Look for non-invasive varieties like the thornless ‘Chester’ and ‘Waldo’. Produce fruit in Summer on last year’s canes. They are vigorous growers up to 10m. Strawberries - Bush Alpine is an easy, runnerless variety. Keith recommends ‘Cambridge Rival’ ‘Chandler’ along with Japanese variety Hokawase. Will yield for 3-4 years of production. - Great to grow in baskets, pots, raised beds. Full sun and lots of organic matter - Plant in April-May Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:30:22

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Citrus

4/16/2024
With Elisabeth busy with garden and house renovations this week, we have decided to replay one of our listeners favorite episodes. Join us to hear Keith’s tips on growing citrus. Follow Keith’s tips for healthy, disease free, fruit producing citrus in your home garden. Citrus trees love full sun and free draining soil. Not sure where to put it? Put it in a pot.Citrus are grown on different rootstocks - can be important to know what root stock it’s grown on to ensure it’s suited to your conditions and soil. For example “flying dragon” rootstock will tolerate heavier soils and some wetness.Citrus have surface-feeding roots which means their roots like first access to feed and they are heavy feeders. Feed citrus monthly as they have no dormant period. Keith suggests Neutrog Gyganics at half recommended rate but applied monthly. Potassium can help with fruit production Most citrus don’t like frost! The occasional frost can be tolerated. Keith advises leaving frost burnt leaves on the plant as these can protect undamaged foliage from further frost damageCitrus don’t like competition. Avoid planting in the lawn unless you have a large lawn free area under the canopy of the tree.pH prefer soil 5 - 5.5 and definitely not over 6.Pruning - prune to size where fruit is reachable and ensure centre of tree is nice and open to allow sunlight to all parts of the treePests and diseases are common issues with citrus. Black scale exudes sugary substance that ants feed on and spread and this can cause sooty mould. Regular application of Eco Oil will assist with avoiding pests. Citrus gall wasp originates from Australian native Finger Lime. The gall wasp will create a knobbly growth on the tree that inhibits growth. Prune these off and put straight into rubbish (not compost!). Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:18:56

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Question Time 23!

4/9/2024
Who will be the lucky winner of this week’s prize from The Plant Runner? Another packed episode of excellent questions from our listeners and hear more about what Keith does (when he’s not talking to us about gardening!) Some great tips this week include: Your ECO Neem and Eco Oil mix can be made up and left in the sprayer for use. Adding a couple of drops of detergent can help others like Bordeaux spray from becoming pasty Acer Negundo Box Elder tree can be a weedy species Compacted clay soil? Hear Keith’s tips on preparing this soil before planting including loosening with F.D Ryan's broadfork, when to use gypsum and adding products like MycoGold Shade loving perennials - Keith recommends Ajuga, Ligularia dentata reniformis (Tractor Seat Plant), Chatham Island Forget-me-not, Arthropodium, Sedum, Clivia, Primula, Veltheimia Bracteata Tall plants like Aster falling over? Try crowding with other plants to support. Different forms of salivias, agastache, achillea for example. Cherries (Keith recommends lapin variety) and pears (Keith suggests Packham’s Triumph) both require cross pollination for good crop production. Can you apply crop rotation principles to flowering annuals? Probably not but ensure you are improving soil with Clyde’s lignite, Munash Rock Dust, Clyde's Compost Hear how to remove Kaikuyu lawn. Use Slasher, cover with Weed G Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:21:59

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Meeting the team from Biostim

4/2/2024
Ever heard of mychorrhizal funghi or have any idea how they benefit your garden? Well this week, we meet Tim Lister from BioStim who explains all! BioStim’s MycoGold can be add back beneficial fungal spores to our soil to replenish what has been lost through fertilising, chemical herbicides etc. This product is available to the home gardener. A small amount can be added at the seedling stage or when planting out pots either directly to the soil or mixed in water.During high growth periods like spring, Mycgold can be added to soil where soil might be depleted. Unlike traditional fertilisers, the live fungal spores contained in this product will continue to work symbiotically with your plants roots long after application.tNot compatible with brassicas or blueberries.Available from Diggers Club or directly through BioStim Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:18:43

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Autumn Gardening Tasks

3/26/2024
Autumn is here and there is plenty to do in the garden! This week, hear Keith and Elisabeth’s suggestions on what to get done in the garden this Autumn. Pruning and deadhead perennials such as hydrangeas, salvias, lavender etcPrune espalier apples and citrusRejuvenate your soil after summer with a broad fork (Keith recommends F.D Ryan's) before adding Rooster Booster, Clyde's Compost, Clyde’s lignite along with a liquid fertiliser like Charlie Carp or Power FeedFeed citrus - try Harry's Citrus Food or Neutrog GyganicsTomatoes are finishing up and will need to be removedPlant garlic cloves - 50mm in Vic, 100mm in warmer climatesSow brassica seeds - broccoli, cabbage, cauliflowers etcDividing and propagating perennials including Japanese windflowers, dahlias, salvias, sedum, grasses, oakleaf hydrangeaGrow from cuttings - snip off just below a root node, dip into rooting powder and put into pot (or water)Broadfork your lawn and feed with Rooster Booster and keep lawn high until winter monthsPlant bulbs - daffodils, hyacinths, jonquils, irises etc. Plant close together for maximum impact. Underplant Autumn leaves are a great carbon addition in the compost. Enjoy the glorious colours of Autumn and the cooler working weather! Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:16:02

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Elisabeth's New Garden

3/19/2024
We’ve heard Elisabeth mention “my new garden” a number of times. Now we have the opportunity to follow Elisabeth’s journey to creating her new dream garden. Keith drew up plans for the garden using council plans and including Elisabeth’s plant selections and ideas. Elisabeth started the transformation with the most visible section. Two ModBOX raised beds are accessible to the kitchen for Elisabeth’s vegetables. Before any planting, soil was improved with Clyde's Compost and Clyde’s lignite. Morningside Landscapes are assisting with the heavy lifting. Next granitic sand will be laid before they getting starting on irrigation system using Dan micro sprinklers. What’s on Elisabeth’s plant list? Japanese anemone, Crepe Myrtle, Baby Bay Tree, citrus, oleander, smoke bush, correa, leucadendron, liriope, euphorbia, lavender, grasses, viburnum, nepeta, oak leaf hydrangea, salivias, wistringia. Syzygium australe will be used as a screening plant. Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:15:42

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Question Time 22!

3/12/2024
Who will be the lucky winner of this week’s prize from The Plant Runner? Another packed episode of excellent questions from our listeners and hear more about what Keith does (when he’s not talking to us about gardening!) Some great tips this week include: Your ECO Neem and Eco Oil mix can be made up and left in the sprayer for use. Adding a couple of drops of detergent can help others like Bordeaux spray from becoming pasty Acer Negundo Box Elder tree can be a weedy species Compacted clay soil? Hear Keith’s tips on preparing this soil before planting including loosening with F.D Ryan's broadfork, when to use gypsum and adding products like MycoGold Shade loving perennials - Keith recommends Ajuga, Ligularia dentata reniformis (Tractor Seat Plant), Chatham Island Forget-me-not, Arthropodium, Sedum, Clivia, Primula, Veltheimia Bracteata Tall plants like Aster falling over? Try crowding with other plants to support. Different forms of salivias, agastache, achillea for example. Cherries (Keith recommends lapin variety) and pears (Keith suggests Packham’s Triumph) both require cross pollination for good crop production. Can you apply crop rotation principles to flowering annuals? Probably not but ensure you are improving soil with Clyde’s lignite, Munash Rock Dust, Clyde's Compost Hear how to remove Kaikuyu lawn. Use Slasher, cover with Where you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:22:55

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Alternatives to a grass lawn

3/5/2024
What alternatives are there to the classic, Australian lawn? Synthetic? Elisabeth is not a fan, will Keith convince her that they have a place? Before considering an alternative, consider a few elements - amount of sun, foot traffic, water conditions etcGranitic sand - can be a great alternative for areas between plants, border beds or for paths. Mulch - Keith recommends 10mm pine barkLooking for a live lawn alternative? Herbaceous alternatives include: Creeping thyme, chamomile, prostate rosemary, round baby pigface, pennyroyal, Other plants that are suitable lawn alternatives - baby sunrose, zoysia tenuifolia, pratia pedunculataNative options include dichondra (either repens or silver falls variety) or native violetsConsider establishing a Wildflower Meadow as we explored in an episode in October 2023 (listen now Apple Podcasts or Spotify)Stepping stones will help keep foot traffic down to reduce damage to your lawn alternativeWhere you can find all things Muddy Boots! Website: https://www.muddyboots.net.au/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/muddybootspodcast/ Facebook: Muddy Boots Podcast | Facebook

Duration:00:19:00