Michigan Radio: Science/Medicine-logo

Michigan Radio: Science/Medicine

Michigan PR

Assorted stories from Michigan Radio.

Assorted stories from Michigan Radio.
More Information

Location:

United States

Networks:

Michigan PR

Description:

Assorted stories from Michigan Radio.

Language:

English


Episodes

Stateside: Where candidates stand on Healthy Michigan; what teachers spend in the classroom

9/14/2018
More
Today on Stateside , we hear from Kalamazoo’s city manager about the response to protests over homelessness in the city. Plus, parents aren’t the only ones with long lists of school supplies to buy before the year starts—teachers are spending their own money on classroom essentials, too. City manager addresses protests over homelessness in Kalamazoo Kalamazoo City Manager Jim Ritsema responds to demands made by a group of protesters over homelessness in the city. Journalist who covered...

Duration:00:49:43

Where gubernatorial candidates stand on Medicaid work requirements and Healthy Michigan

9/14/2018
More
This election year, Stateside is doing some quick interviews on one topic with the candidates running for governor. You can find all our coverage of the gubernatorial race here . Today, we’re talking about Medicaid work requirements and the future of the Healthy Michigan Plan, which is the state-run Medicaid expansion.

Duration:00:18:09

Why calling cancer a “battle” puts an unfair burden on patients

8/30/2018
More
In the past few weeks, there have been two high-profile people who lost their lives to cancer. Aretha Franklin died from pancreatic cancer. John McCain died from a brain cancer called glioblastoma.

Duration:00:05:27

Stateside 8.21.2018

8/21/2018
More
Today on Stateside , what happens when someone's relationship to food - and to their own body - spirals out of control? We talk to an eating disorder expert. Plus, a Detroit Mixtape tribute to the Queen of Soul. To hear individual segments, click here or see below:

Duration:00:50:02

Michigan's underfunded public health system is failing, says report

8/21/2018
More
Michigan is one of the lowest ranking states when it comes to investing in public health. According to a new report from the Citizens Research Council of Michigan , the results of underinvestment are clear.

Duration:00:06:22

Failing to treat eating disorders can have dangerous, and sometimes fatal, results

8/21/2018
More
Food is supposed to nourish us, both body and spirit. But what happens when someone's relationship to food - and to their own body - spirals out of control? An eating disorder not only interferes with someone's quality of life. It can also be fatal if it's not treated.

Duration:00:15:21

UP’s first health needs assessment points to aging population, substance abuse as main concerns

8/20/2018
More
The Upper Peninsula Health Departments has published their first ever Community Health Needs Assessment . This 350-page report combines 18 months of research, surveying 5000 households spread over the regions' 15 counties.

Duration:00:04:51

Food insecurity in adolescence linked to riskier sexual behavior

8/7/2018
More
Think for a moment of a teenager's appetite. Immediately, jokes about a bottomless pit come to mind. That appetite has a purpose — it’s fueled by the burst in growth and development happening to that teen. But what happens when teens don't have access to a stable food source? Sharon Kukla-Acevedo , an associate professor of public administration at Central Michigan University, has been doing research on just that. She joined Stateside to talk to us about her latest research on the effect of...

Duration:00:06:50

Some people struggle to afford pads and tampons. This Grand Rapids nonprofit wants to help.

7/30/2018
More
People everywhere need access to pads, tampons, and other feminine hygiene products, but throughout Michigan, some women and people in the transgender community are forced to go without. It’s a global phenomenon known as “period poverty.” Christine Mwangi is founder of Be a Rose, an organization working to fight period poverty in the Grand Rapids area. She joined Stateside to talk about her organization is expanding access to resources and information related to women’s health.

Duration:00:07:02

Stateside 7.23.2018

7/23/2018
More
Today on Stateside , how inequality and discrimination fueled an uprising in Grand Rapids, just days after riots began in Detroit. Plus, a University of Michigan pediatrician says that saying Flint's children have been poisoned by lead does more harm than good. To hear individual interviews, click here or see below:

Duration:00:50:04

When Legionnaires’ first showed up 42 years ago, it was a medical mystery

7/23/2018
More
H ealth officials have reported a rise in cases of Legionnaires' disease this summer both nationally and here in Michigan . I t's been 42 years since the first outbreak of the mystery disease that eventually became known as legionellosi s — and it took some serious medical detective work to figure it out.

Duration:00:06:22

Calling Flint kids “poisoned” is inaccurate and harmful, says UM pediatrician

7/23/2018
More
Were the children of Flint "poisoned?” It’s a word that gets tossed around a lot in connection to the lead exposure caused by Flint’s improperly treated drinking water. But in an opinion piece published in Sunday’s New York Times , Dr. Hernán Gómez and co-author Kim Dietrich argue that saying Flint's children have been poisoned "unjustly stigmatizes their generation."

Duration:00:06:58

Stateside 7.19.2018

7/19/2018
More
Today on Stateside , we talk to state senator and Republican gubernatorial candidate Patrick Colbeck about Medicaid reform, tax cuts, and controversial comments on a Democratic candidate. Plus, a former college football player who wants to change the culture around mental health among student athletes. To hear individual interviews, click here or see below:

Duration:00:50:58

Your dog can get a Lyme disease vaccine. Why can’t you?

7/16/2018
More
If you’re out in wooded or brushy areas this summer and want to avoid Lyme disease, here’s the advice of the day: Wear long sleeves and pants, and check yourself frequently for ticks, which spread the disease. But for a time in the late 1990s and early 2000s, people had the option to take an even more preventative measure: They could get a Lyme disease vaccine.

Duration:00:06:22

How tribal leaders are responding to the opioid crisis in Michigan's Native American communities

7/13/2018
More
The opioid crisis is taking a tragic toll on families nationwide. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 64,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2016, double the amount from a decade prior. Among Native Americans, the rate of opioid overdoses is disproportionately higher. In Michigan, opioid-related deaths are nearly twice as high among tribal members compared to other demographics.

Duration:00:11:10

His professor told him he wasn’t cut out for medicine. William Mayo went on to make medical history.

6/27/2018
More
It is the 157 th birthday of someone whose life is proof that you shouldn't let the negative opinions of your professor get in the way of your ambitions. William Mayo, half of the dynamic duo who went on to found the famed Mayo Clinic, was born this week in 1861. Dr. Howard Markel , University of Michigan medical historian and PBS contributor, joined Stateside to tell us about his extraordinary life.

Duration:00:06:31

Libraries find themselves on the front lines of Michigan’s opioid crisis

6/25/2018
More
The opioid epidemic reaches every corner of life in our state. That includes libraries, where administrators and staff are figuring out the best response if a patron appears to be under the influence of drugs, or potentially experiencing an opioid overdose.

Duration:00:09:32

Despite strong economy, Americans report feeling more anxious

6/19/2018
More
Feeling anxious or unsettled? You're not alone. An online poll from the American Psychiatric Association finds 39 percent of American adults reported themselves as more anxious today than they were in 2017.

Duration:00:10:21

World’s tiniest implant could be life-changing for the 3 million Americans with glaucoma

6/18/2018
More
There are more than 3 million Americans living with glaucoma. As Baby Boomers march into their senior years, that number is inevitably going to go up. Now, researchers at the University of Michigan have come up with a medical implant that measures just 1 millimeter, and it's changing the way we treat glaucoma.

Duration:00:09:45

Michigan law makes it nearly impossible to sue opioid manufacturers

6/15/2018
More
The opioid epidemic is causing death and havoc for families all across the United States. Hundreds of state and local governments have filed lawsuits against the manufacturers of the prescription opioids. Among those suing are 50 cities in Michigan. There is a big hurdle for those Michigan cities to clear, though. A 1995 state law, sponsored by then-state senator Bill Schuette, gave pharmaceutical companies protection from lawsuits filed by consumers.

Duration:00:07:55