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American History Tellers

Wondery

American History Tellers is an immersive history show, drawing listeners into the drama of the era. Using evocative language, sound design and music, the show will transport us through the important events and periods that have defined American history. We’ll meet the people who made decisions and drove events, we’ll go to the places where the story unfolded, and be flies on the walls in the rooms where it happened — all while keeping a keen eye on the lives of everyday people living through it.

American History Tellers is an immersive history show, drawing listeners into the drama of the era. Using evocative language, sound design and music, the show will transport us through the important events and periods that have defined American history. We’ll meet the people who made decisions and drove events, we’ll go to the places where the story unfolded, and be flies on the walls in the rooms where it happened — all while keeping a keen eye on the lives of everyday people living through it.
More Information

Location:

United States

Networks:

Wondery

Description:

American History Tellers is an immersive history show, drawing listeners into the drama of the era. Using evocative language, sound design and music, the show will transport us through the important events and periods that have defined American history. We’ll meet the people who made decisions and drove events, we’ll go to the places where the story unfolded, and be flies on the walls in the rooms where it happened — all while keeping a keen eye on the lives of everyday people living through it.

Language:

English


Episodes

Political Parties - The Golden Age of the GOP | 4

12/12/2018
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As the Civil War came to a close, the government set its sights once again on the future of the United States. Working closely with a Republican President, the Republican Congress expected a swift and peaceful road to Reconstruction. But then, a mere four weeks into his second term, Lincoln was assassinated, leaving the country in the hands of Andrew Johnson, a Southern Democrat who had personally owned slaves just three years before. While Johnson’s unwavering commitment to states rights...

Duration:00:51:55

Political Parties - The Turbulent 1850s | 3

12/5/2018
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The United States won the The Mexican–American War in the 1840s, and with it vast new stretches of western land. But in the 1850s, the question of what to do with this land – and whether to allow slavery in the new territories or not – became a redning issue for politicians of all stripes. While the Whig Party collapsed over the issue, Democrats split into Northern and Southern factions, and a new Republican Party tried to bind the Union with an appeal to old Jeffersonian values. But in the...

Duration:00:47:35

Lindsay Graham's Newest Podcast: 1865

12/3/2018
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April 15, 1865. President Lincoln is dead and the country in turmoil. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton takes control, determined to bring the assassin to justice. Heavily researched, this historical political thriller is an audio drama that explores America’s darkest hours. The story is astonishing—and all of it is based on true events. You can listen to new weekly episodes of 1865 exclusively on Stitcher Premium. For a free month of Stitcher Premium, go to stitcherpremium.com/1865 and use...

Duration:00:11:53

History of the Lincoln Motor Company | 9

11/30/2018
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Named after one of the greatest U.S. presidents, the Lincoln Motor Company has become as ingrained in American culture as the Statue of Liberty. Founded by Henry Leland to produce plane engines during World War I, Lincoln became a key driver of the early automobile industry in the United States and a pioneer of the luxury car market. But when Leland’s vision proved too ambitious for the nascent American car market, Lincoln was purchased by the Ford Motor Company. The Ford acquisition would...

Duration:00:24:26

Political Parties - Jacksonian Democracy | 2

11/28/2018
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Andrew Jackson lost the 1824 presidential election to John Quincy Adams through what some called a “corrupt bargain” in the House of Representatives. The maneuver was masterminded by hot-headed but politically savvy Henry Clay, who with Adams, announced their intent for far-reaching new federal programs. Fierce opposition to these policies united pro-Jackson supporters who formed a new party, the Democrats, to rally around their hero and elect him to president in 1828. But while Adams was...

Duration:00:51:08

Political Parties - A Tale of Two Parties | 1

11/21/2018
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In the earliest days of the United States, there was no such thing as an organized political party. George Washington, elected twice to the presidency unanimously in the Electoral College, warned the new nation against political factions, writing that organized parties would become, “potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men subvert the power of the people.” But immediately after Washington vacated the Presidency, factions did spring up and bitter personal rivalries...

Duration:00:49:45

Civil Rights - Interview with Peggy Trotter Dammond Preacely | 7

11/14/2018
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We conclude our series on the American Civil Right Movement with an interview with a woman who was there, on the front lines of the fight. Peggy Trotter Dammond Preacely is longtime civil rights activist and artist. She was a Freedom Rider, boarding busses to travel the south in a fight for desegregation, and member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, participating in sit-ins, marches, and voter registration campaigns. She marched on Washington, was arrested three times, was...

Duration:00:45:46

Civil Rights - The Unfinished Journey | 6

11/7/2018
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Seeking to build upon the gains of the early 1960s, Civil Rights activists pushed forward on a series of ambitious efforts. Voting rights activists returned to Alabama and again faced violent reprisal—this time televised for the country to witness. A shocked nation watched the violence in Selma in horror; Congress took action, passing the Voting Rights Act. Off of this success, Martin Luther King Jr. began building a coalition of activist groups to turn the nation’s attention to the fight...

Duration:00:50:03

Introducing The City

11/5/2018
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The City tells true stories of how power works in urban America. Season 1 begins in Chicago, 1990. After years of disinvestment, highways are rebuilt, old buildings demolished, and new skyscrapers erected. All that rubble has to go somewhere, and its destination isn’t a landfill—it’s a pair of vacant lots in a predominately black, working-class neighborhood called North Lawndale. The man behind this operation is a white guy sporting a Cosby sweater and underworld connections. What follows...

Duration:00:07:01

Civil Rights - On The March | 5

10/31/2018
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As the Civil Rights movement entered the landmark years of 1963 and 1964, activists had faced many challenges - but had also won many victories. Now, they sought to launch new campaigns in Alabama and Mississippi and mass demonstrations in Washington D.C. and New York City. In the span of sixteen remarkable months, the movement and the nation itself would be transformed, walking the razor’s edge between triumph and tragedy. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Rockstar Games- Preorder...

Duration:00:53:54

Civil Rights - Prairie Fire | 4

10/24/2018
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As the Civil Rights movement entered the Sixties, a new generation of activists took the fore. Frustrated by the pace of progress but emboldened by strides made in the previous decade, students embraced “nonviolent direct action,” protest techniques that were provocative but peaceful. Soon, a wave of sit-ins hit lunch counters across the South. The response was caustic, often violent; but the protesters’ persistence led to negotiations with business owners and civil authorities that led to...

Duration:00:45:45

Civil Rights - Jim Crow Fights Back | 3

10/17/2018
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After the Brown V. Board of Education ruling, civil rights activists had legal standing to desegregate schools. But doing so proved dangerous. The first black students to step into newly integrated schools faced extreme hostility from whites who felt Jim Crow society was under attack. The segregationists defied federal court orders. When National Guard troops sent by President Eisenhower forced the issue, white supremacists changed tactics, patiently and cruely wielding political and...

Duration:00:46:18

Introducing Legal Wars | 9

10/11/2018
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The courtroom can be a battlefield over money, people’s rights, and even their lives. For some cases, the consequences can affect us long after the verdict is read. Based on extensive interviews and court transcripts, Wondery’s new podcast LEGAL WARS puts you inside the jury box of some of the most famous court cases in American history. Subscribe to Legal Wars today at www.wondery.fm/legalwars

Duration:00:11:45

Strides Towards Freedom | 2

10/10/2018
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In 1896, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that segregation was legal, on a “separate but equal” basis. But for more than five decades, life for black and white Americans was seldom equal, but always separate. To fight segregation, the NAACP and others exposed the dismal and debasing conditions in black schools. They won a monumental victory in Brown v. Board of Education—but then a young boy from Chicago named Emmett Till was dredged from the swamps of Mississippi. Till’s death galvanized the...

Duration:00:43:19

Civil Rights - New World A’Comin | 1

10/3/2018
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President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, freeing the slaves in much of the South. But the road to freedom—true freedom—would take generations longer for most black Americans. In this new six-part series, we investigate their struggle, beginning in the heady post-war years of the Forties. Segregation was endemic; it was the law of the South, and the custom of the North and West. No black American escaped its demeaning and often violent grip. But in...

Duration:00:45:27

National Parks - Interview with Parks Superintendent Greg Dudgeon | 7

9/26/2018
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In 1980, Jimmy Carter signed into law the The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, or ANILCA. That act remains controversial even today, as it set aside 43,585,000 acres of new national parklands in Alaska, including the Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve and the Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. Superintendent Greg Dudgeon oversees both and continues to balance the mandate of the Parks’ mission with the needs of Alaskan residents. We’ll talk to Greg about his...

Duration:00:41:20

National Parks - Fire and Ice | 6

9/19/2018
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Alaska: big, open, frozen and wild. In 1867, the acquisition of Alaska from the Russian Empire was widely derided as “folly.” Early explorers like John Muir saw its potential though, and clamored for its preservation in the face of increasing development and calls for statehood. But when oil is discovered, the real fight begins. Caught between angry Alaskan individualists and an ambitious federal government, the National Park Service struggles to do what’s right for the land and the people...

Duration:00:46:14

Introducing American Scandal | 8

9/18/2018
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Since the founding of the United States, in every generation, in every field of business, politics, sports and society, we’ve watched in shock as corruption, deceit and desire bring down heroes, titans and those we thought we could trust. In the aftermath, we’re left with too many questions, how did this happen? Who is to blame? Subscribe to American Scandal today. www.wondery.fm/scandal

Duration:00:16:45

National Parks - Playgrounds of the People | 5

9/12/2018
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In 1914, America’s National Parks had a problem: no one was using them. And those few that were faced unmaintained roads, trails strewn with garbage, and a lack of amenities that made it hard for the average American to enjoy themselves. One man had enough, and went to Washington on a mission: establish a new National Parks Service, and transform these neglected, magic spaces into clean, approachable, fun vacation destinations. But in taking the reins, mining tycoon and marketing genius...

Duration:00:41:54

National Parks - The Great Disaster | 4

9/5/2018
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In the early morning hours of Wednesday, April 18, 1906, the city of San Francisco was torn apart by a huge earthquake–but it was the subsequent fires that did the most damage. As the city sought to rebuild, it also sought a more secure water supply, to break the stranglehold of a water company monopoly and insure that if fire were to strike the city again, abundant water was available to fight it. But a new reservoir would require the flooding of a treasured portion of Yosemite, the Hetch...

Duration:00:43:35