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Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

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Ben Franklin’s World is a podcast for people who love history and for those who want to know more about the historical people and events that have impacted and shaped our present-day world. Every Tuesday, Dr. Liz Covart speaks with historians and experts in early American history about everything from the political factions to the religious fervors and from the common illnesses to the favorite pastimes of the period. The show is produced by the Omohundro Institute--the first and foremost group in the United States dedicated to the study of early America. As part of its mission, the OI produces the Doing History series, an annual series designed to take you behind the scenes of history to show you how historians know what they know about the past and how they work.

Ben Franklin’s World is a podcast for people who love history and for those who want to know more about the historical people and events that have impacted and shaped our present-day world. Every Tuesday, Dr. Liz Covart speaks with historians and experts in early American history about everything from the political factions to the religious fervors and from the common illnesses to the favorite pastimes of the period. The show is produced by the Omohundro Institute--the first and foremost group in the United States dedicated to the study of early America. As part of its mission, the OI produces the Doing History series, an annual series designed to take you behind the scenes of history to show you how historians know what they know about the past and how they work.
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Location:

Williamsburg, VA

Description:

Ben Franklin’s World is a podcast for people who love history and for those who want to know more about the historical people and events that have impacted and shaped our present-day world. Every Tuesday, Dr. Liz Covart speaks with historians and experts in early American history about everything from the political factions to the religious fervors and from the common illnesses to the favorite pastimes of the period. The show is produced by the Omohundro Institute--the first and foremost group in the United States dedicated to the study of early America. As part of its mission, the OI produces the Doing History series, an annual series designed to take you behind the scenes of history to show you how historians know what they know about the past and how they work.

Language:

English


Episodes

274 Vast Early America Series: The Other Slavery

1/21/2020
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In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue. He also played a central role in the European adoption of Indian or Native American slavery. When we think of slavery in early America, we often think of the practice of African and African-American chattel slavery. However, that system of slavery wasn’t the only system of slavery that existed in North America. Systems of Indian slavery existed too. In fact, Indians remained enslaved long after the 13th Amendment abolished African-American slavery in...

Duration:00:45:55

273 Vast Early America Series: Round About the Earth: Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit

1/14/2020
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In 1492, Christopher Columbus sailed the ocean blue as part of the great European quest to find new routes and shortcuts to the spice islands and territories of Asia. Columbus’ “discovery” of the Caribbean and North America caused European peoples to colonize North and South America. It also encouraged Europeans to keep up their search for new ways to access Asia. Joyce E. Chaplin, the James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History at Harvard University and author of Round About...

Duration:00:43:38

272 Vast Early America Series: Information & Communication in the Early American South

1/7/2020
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We live in an age of information. The internet provides us with 24/7 access to all types of information—news, how-to articles, sports scores, entertainment news, and congressional votes. But what do we do with all of this knowledge? How do we sift through and interpret it all? We are not the first people to ponder these questions. Alejandra Dubcovsky, an Associate Professor at University of California, Riverside and author of Informed Power: Communication in the Early South takes us...

Duration:00:39:57

271 BFW Team Favorites: Paul Revere's Ride Through History

12/31/2019
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On April 18, 1775, Paul Revere rode to Lexington, Massachusetts to spread the alarm that the Regulars were marching. Revere made several important rides between 1774 and 1775, including one in September 1774 that brought the Suffolk Resolves to the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia. So why is it that we remember Paul Revere’s ride to Lexington and not any of his other rides? Why is it that we remember Paul Revere on the night of April 18, 1775 and nothing about his life either...

Duration:01:32:57

270 BFW Team Favorites: Slavery & Freedom in Early Maryland

12/24/2019
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How do you uncover the life of an enslaved person who left no paper trail? What can the everyday life of an enslaved person tell us about slavery, how it was practiced, and how some enslaved people made the transition from slavery to freedom? We explore the life of Charity Folks, an enslaved woman from Maryland who gained her freedom in the late-18th century. Our guide through Charity’s life is Jessica Millward, an Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine and...

Duration:00:50:14

269 BFW Team Favorites: One Colonial Woman's World

12/17/2019
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What was everyday life like for average men and women in early America? Listeners ask this question more than any other question and today we continue to try to answer it. Michelle Marchetti Coughlin, author of One Colonial Woman's World: The Life and Writings of Mehetabel Chandler Coit, joins us to explore the life of an average woman who lived in early New England. This episode originally posted as Episode 032. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/269 Sponsor...

Duration:00:46:09

268 BFW Team Favorites: Young Benjamin Franklin

12/10/2019
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What in the first 40 years of his life made Benjamin Franklin the genius he became? Benjamin Franklin serves as a great window on to the early American past because as a man of “variety” he pursued many interests: literature, poetry, science, business, philosophy, philanthropy, and politics. But one aspect of Franklin’s life has gone largely unstudied: his childhood and early life. Nick Bunker, author of Young Benjamin Franklin: The Birth of Ingenuity, joins us to explore Benjamin...

Duration:01:02:13

267 Thomas Wickman, Winter in the Early American Northeast

12/3/2019
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How did the people of early America experience and feel about winter? Thomas Wickman, an Associate Professor of History and American Studies at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and author of Snowshoe Country: An Environmental and Cultural Winter in the Early American Northeast, joins us to investigate how Native Americans and early Americans experienced and felt about winter during the 17th and early 18th centuries. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/267 Sponsor...

Duration:01:02:06

266 Johann Neem, Education in Early America

11/26/2019
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How did early Americans educate their children? How and when did Americans create a formal system of public education? You sent me these questions for Episode 200: Everyday Life in Early America. You also said you wanted to know more about how early American boys and girls learned the trades they would practice later in life. Johann Neem, a Professor of History at Western Washington University and author of Democracy’s Schools: The Rise of Public Education in America, joins us to further...

Duration:00:32:12

265 Lindsay Chervinsky, An Early History of the White House

11/19/2019
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On July 1, 1790, Congress passed “An Act for Establishing the temporary and permanent Seat of the Government of the United States.” This act formalized a plan to move the capital of the United States from New York City to Philadelphia, for a period of 10 years, and then from Philadelphia to Washington D.C., where the United States government would make its permanent home. What buildings did Congress have erected to house the government? Lindsay Chervinsky works for the White House...

Duration:01:00:26

264 Michael Oberg, The Iroquois, United States, and the Treaty of Canandaigua 1794

11/12/2019
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The Treaty of Paris 1783 ended the American War for Independence, but it did not bring peace to North America. After 1783, warfare and violence continued between Americans and Native Americans. So how did the early United States attempt to create peace for itsnew nation? Michael Oberg, a Distinguished Professor of History at the State University of New York-Geneseo and the author of Peacemakers: The Iroquois, the United States, and the Treaty of Canandaigua, joins us to investigate how the...

Duration:00:56:44

263 Sari Altschuler, The Medical Imagination

11/5/2019
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Did you know that imagination once played a key role in the way Americans understood and practiced medicine? Sari Altschuler, an Assistant Professor of English at Northeastern University and author of The Medical Imagination: Literature and Health in the Early United States, joins us to investigate the ways early American doctors used imagination in their practice and learning of medicine. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/263 Sponsor Links Omohundro InstituteThe Ben...

Duration:00:52:18

262 Interpreting the Fourth Amendment (Doing History 4)

10/29/2019
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History is an important tool when it comes to understanding American law. History is what the justices of the United States Supreme Court use when they want to ascertain what the framers meant when they drafted the Constitution of 1787 and its first ten amendments in 1789. History is also the tool we use when we want to know how and why the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the Constitution and its amendments have changed over time. Sarah Seo, an Associate Professor of Law at the...

Duration:01:02:45

261 Creating the Fourth Amendment (Doing History 4)

10/22/2019
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The Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution doesn’t always make headlines, but it’s an amendment that undergirds foundational rights. It’s also an amendment that can show us a lot about the intertwined nature between history and American law. In this 3rd episode of our 4th Doing History series, we explore the early American origins of the Fourth Amendment with Thomas Clancy, a Professor Emeritus at the University of Mississippi School of Law and an expert on the Fourth...

Duration:00:58:35

260 Origins of the Bill of Rights (Doing History 4)

10/15/2019
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How and why did Congress draft the First Ten Amendments to the Constitution? In the United States, we use the Constitution and Bill of Rights to understand and define ourselves culturally. Americans are a people with laws and rights that are protected by the Constitution because they are defined in the Constitution. And the place where the Constitution defines and outlines our rights is within its First Ten Amendments, the Bill of Rights. In this second episode of our 4th Doing History...

Duration:01:01:29

259 The Bill of Rights & How Legal Historians Work (Doing History 4)

10/8/2019
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Law is all around us. And the basis of American Law comes not only from our early American past, but from our founding documents. This episode begins our 4th Doing History series. Over the next four episodes, we’ll explore the early American origins of the Bill of Rights as well as the history of the Fourth Amendment. The Fourth Amendment will serve as our case study so we can see where our rights come from and how they developed from the early American past. In this episode we go inside...

Duration:01:11:46

258 Jane Calvert, John Dickinson: Life, Religion, and Politics

10/1/2019
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The Second Continental Congress voted for independence on July 2, 1776 with 12 colonies and one abstention. The delegation from New York abstained from the vote. And Pennsylvania voted in favor of independence because two of its delegates were persuaded not to attend the vote given their opposition. John Dickinson was one of the two delegates who absented himself from the vote. Later, he would refuse to sign the Declaration of Independence. But why? Jane Calvert, an Associate Professor of...

Duration:01:00:51

257 Catherine O'Donnell, Elizabeth Seton: An Early American Life

9/24/2019
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What was it like to live as a woman of faith in early republic America? What was it like to live as a Catholic in the early United States? Catherine O’Donnell, an Associate Professor of History at Arizona State University and author of Elizabeth Seton: American Saint, helps us investigate answers to these questions by taking us through the life of the United States’ first saint: Elizabeth Ann Seton. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/257 Atlanta Meet Up October 12, 4pm at...

Duration:00:52:17

256 Christian Koot, Mapping Empire in the Chesapeake

9/17/2019
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How do empires come to be? How are empires made and who makes them? What role do maps play in making empires? Christian Koot is a Professor of History at Towson University and the author of A Biography of a Map in Motion: Augustine Herrman’s Chesapeake. Christian has researched and written two books about the seventeenth-century Anglo-Dutch World to better understand empires and how they are made. Today, he joins us to take us through his research and to share what one specific map,...

Duration:01:01:11

255 Martha S. Jones, Birthright Citizenship

9/10/2019
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Who gets to be a citizen of the United States? How does the United States define who belongs to the nation? Early Americans asked and grappled with these questions during the earliest days of the early republic. Martha S. Jones is a Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University and a former public interest litigator. Using details from her book, Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America, Martha joins us to investigate how early Americans thought about...

Duration:00:58:08