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History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, Civil War

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The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present

5/23/2019
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The received idea of Native American history--as promulgated by books like Dee Brown's mega-bestselling 1970 Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee--has been that American Indian history essentially ended with the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee. Not only did one hundred fifty Sioux die at the hands of the U. S. Cavalry, the sense was, but Native civilization did as well. Today's guest David Treuer has a different take on this history. Growing up Ojibwe on a reservation in Minnesota, training as an...

Duration:00:39:07

How Industrialists Plotted to Overthrow FDR Over The New Deal in 1934

5/21/2019
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FDR launched the New Deal immediately after his 1933 inauguration, but it was not universally popular. Some hated it bitterly. Critics from the right thought it was part of a long-term plan to push America into Soviet-style socialism. Critics from the left like Louisiana Governor Huey Long thought it didn't go far enough. Long pushed the “Share Our Wealth” plan, demanding that Congress confiscate individual earnings over $1 million, using those funds for health care and college tuition. He...

Duration:00:41:23

Teaser: Rendezvous With Death, Part 4

5/18/2019
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Duration:00:08:35

Making Your Death Memorable: The Oldest Tombs We Can Trace To One Person

5/16/2019
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What are the oldest known tombs that can reliably be traced to a person? These are surprisingly tricky to track down. While archeologists constantly find human remains at an excavation site, there are almost never any identifying marks about the person. This is particularly true in the ancient world. Other than massive sites like the pyramids, we have little knowledge about the final resting places of famous figures. We don't even know the burial site of Alexander the Great -- the biggest...

Duration:00:39:08

The Kremlin Letters: Stalin's Wartime Correspondence with Churchill and Roosevelt

5/14/2019
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From 1941 to 1945, Joseph Stalin exchanged more than six hundred messages with Allied leaders Churchill and Roosevelt. The correspondence ranged from intimate personal greetings to weighty salvos about diplomacy and strategy, and they reveal political machinations and human stories behind the Allied triumvirate. Today's guest is David Reynolds, author of a new book about the correspondence between the three. He helped edit a volume based on the correspondence among the Allied triumvirate,...

Duration:01:02:16

The RAF Won the Battle of Britain With Strategy But Also Plenty of Luck

5/9/2019
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In the summer of 1940, Germany sent armadas of bombers and fighters over England hoping to lure the RAF into battle and annihilate the defenders. Day after day the RAF scrambled their pilots into the sky to do battle up to five times a day. Britain's air defense bent but did not break. All that stood between the British and defeat was a small force of RAF pilots outnumbered in the air by four to one. After pushing back the armada, Winston Churchill declared: "Never before in human history...

Duration:00:43:11

Why The Printing Press Appeared in the Middle East 400 Years After Europe

5/7/2019
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Why were there no printing presses in the Middle East until four centuries after Europe? Did it have to do with Islam prohibiting this technology? Was the calligraphy lobby too strong? Or is the answer more complicated? The global spread of the printing press began with the invention of movable type by Johannes Gutenberg in 1439. A few decades later there were millions of books in Europe. But there were few printing presses in the Ottoman Empire until the 1800s. Some historians say this has...

Duration:00:48:53

Teaser: Rendezvous With Death, Part 3

5/4/2019
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Duration:00:20:15

Last Night on the Titanic: Conclusion

5/2/2019
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In the final episode in this series, Veronica and Scott discuss the enduring legacy of the Titanic and why a disaster that happened 107 years ago still captures our imaginations.

Duration:00:14:31

Last Night on the Titanic: Doctors and Con Artists

4/30/2019
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The Titanic was filled with medical professionals either working as ship personnel or traveling in a non-professional capacity. There were also plenty of con artists aboard, hoping to worm their way into the wills of wealthy widows. Learn about their stories in this episode.

Duration:00:26:02

Last Night on the Titanic: The Musicians

4/25/2019
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The musicians of the Titanic famously continued playing as the ship went down, a testimony to practicing one's craft until their dying breath. But did it really happen like this? Varying accounts exist as to whether the band played until the end and also about what the band was playing. We will explore the accounts in this episode.

Duration:00:20:43

Last Night on the Titanic: The Trend Setters

4/23/2019
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Many Titanic passengers were known for setting the styles. In this episode we will profile the two Luciles: famed fashionistas Lady Lucy Duff-Gordon and Lucile Polk Carter. We will also look at John Jacob Astor IV, perhaps the world’s richest man at the time. He founded hotels that were ground-breaking in their day and continue to set trends long after the eponymous founder's death.

Duration:00:34:17

Teaser: Rendezvous With Death, Part 2

4/20/2019
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Duration:00:10:25

Last Night on the Titanic: The Life Savers

4/18/2019
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Mr. Rogers once said, “When there is a disaster, always look for the helpers; there will always be helpers. Many died on the night of the Titanic's sinking, but many more would have died if not for the heroic efforts of such helpers as the “unsinkable” Molly Brown and Benjamin Guggenheim, a millionaire who acted with utter calm as he gently assisted women and children to lifeboats, knowing he would die within the hour. Other helpers personally swam infants to lifeboats, using every last...

Duration:00:31:18

Last Night on the Titanic: The Cooks

4/16/2019
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The cooks and other support staff of the Titanic “drowned like rats” due to not being assigned a clear place in the pecking order of escapees. One who did survive was French cook Paul Mauge, who used his extraordinary wits to survive. This episode chronicles how cooks like Mauge arrived on the Titanic, how they survived (or didn't), and what it was like for the service personnel on the night the ship went down.

Duration:00:25:13

Sneak Peek of the New Podcast Series "Espionage"

4/13/2019
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Code Names. Deception. Gadgets. It might seem like something out of the movies, but these are just some of the essential components of being a spy. ESPIONAGE tells the stories of the world’s most incredible undercover missions, and how these covert operations succeeded...or failed Espionage is a Parcast Original podcast from the same storytelling team behind hit shows like Unexplained Mysteries, Serial Killers, and Conspiracy Theories. Call to Action: This is the first part of the first...

Duration:00:16:41

Last Night on the Titanic: The Writers

4/11/2019
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The sinking of the Titanic is memorable for its countless stories, and the reason that so many of them have found their way down to us today was the many writers that were onboard the ship. The first draft of history about the Titanic was written by man prominent writers. We will focus on six in this episode: Paul Danby, Adolphe Saalfeld, Edith Rosenbaum Russell, William Stead, Jacques Futrelle, and Lawrence Beesley

Duration:00:40:45

Last Night on the Titanic: The Popcorn Vendor

4/9/2019
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One legendary fixture on the Titanic was a gregarious popcorn vendor known as Popcorn Dan (Coxon). He was one of America's first food truck operators and a highly successful purveyor of popcorn. He was lost on the Titanic and his body was never recovered, although a NY Times article claimed it was him when it wasn't. Coxon lived an interesting life. He resided in a Queen Anne house on the Wisconsin river, which people thought was haunted. He dressed in a fur-lined coat and loved to maintain...

Duration:00:30:46

Teaser: Rendezvous With Death

4/6/2019
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Subscribe today for access to all premium episodes! https://patreon.com/unplugged

Duration:00:05:59

Last Night on the Titanic: The Bakers

4/4/2019
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In this episode we are looking at the life of Charles Joughin, a colorful character who has appeared in both film version of the Titanic. After the sinking, Joughin claimed he knew it was an iceberg that struck the ship because he saw a polar bear— and it waved to him (although, it should be noted, he told this story to nieces and nephews largely to mask the horror of that last night aboard the Titanic). At around 12:15 a.m. Joughin began rousing his kitchen staff. Six of his men were...

Duration:00:40:40