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Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
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Location:

Dallas, TX

Description:

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Language:

English

Contact:

3000 Harry Hines Boulevard Dallas, Texas 75201 800-933-5372


Episodes

The Forgotten Poverty Of Rural Whites

10/18/2018
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Sarah Smarsh grew up in a long line of poor wheat farmers in rural Kansas. She joins us to talk about how working-class poverty stretches across generations – and about our troubling tendency as a nation to judge people based on their wealth. Her new book is called “Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth” (Scribner).

Duration:00:48:16

Why America Should Take Care Of The World

10/18/2018
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As part of his “America First” policy, President Trump has pushed for a reduction in our involvement in global affairs. Robert Kagan of the Brookings Institution joins us to make the case that this strategy leaves a leadership void that will likely make the world a more unstable place. His new book is called “The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World” (Knopf).

Duration:00:48:39

Can A Carbon Tax Curb Climate Change?

10/17/2018
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A report released last week by the United Nations predicts climate change could lead to worsening food shortages and a host of natural disasters as soon as 2040. Jeff Nesbit, executive director of Climate Nexus, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the massive worldwide adjustments necessary to curb these effects – and if a carbon tax is part of the answer. His new book is called “This is the Way the World Ends: How Droughts and Die-Offs, Heat Waves and Hurricanes are Converging on America”...

Duration:00:42:49

The Risk Of Government Brain Drain

10/17/2018
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Much of our attention to government focuses on the Senate confirmation of judges and senior officials. Michael Lewis joins us to talk about the grunts who keep the federal government machine moving — and about how that machine is in danger of grinding to a halt, which he writes about in “The Fifth Risk” (W.W. Norton & Company).

Duration:00:48:39

A Soldier, A Ghost, Shared Love And Betrayal

10/16/2018
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Eden Malcolm spends each day in his hospital bed, unable to communicate with his wife and young daughter. That is until the day he wakes up alone and rediscovers the spark of life. Eden is the creation of Elliot Ackerman, who joins us to tell the story of a soldier coming to grips with his life both before and after war. Ackerman’s new novel is called “Waiting for Eden” (Knopf).

Duration:00:48:40

Us Vs. Them (And Everyone Else In The Middle)

10/16/2018
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It feels as if America is split down the middle between liberals and conservatives. The truth, though, is that we’re divided into even more significant, smaller factions. Researcher Daniel Yudkin joins us to take a more accurate and nuanced look at what separates us from our fellow Americans. He’s an author of the report “Hidden Tribes: A Study of America’s Polarized Landscape,” which was produced by More in Common.

Duration:00:48:41

The History of Impeachment

10/15/2018
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Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton each served as president of the United States — and each faced impeachment while in office. Jeffrey A. Engel, director of the Center for Presidential History at SMU, joins us to take a balanced look at the practice, which offers a check on tyrants while also nullifying the will of the voters. He’s a contributor to “Impeachment: An American History” (Modern Library).

Duration:00:48:40

Gaslighting: The Abuse Is Real

10/15/2018
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“Gaslighting” is the manipulative technique sociopaths, narcissists and others use to control people. Family counselor Stephanie Moulton Sarkis joins us to talk about how we can spot this pattern of lies, distractions and distortions of the truth, which she writes about in “Gaslighting: Recognize Manipulative and Emotionally Abusive People – And Break Free” (Lifelong Books).

Duration:00:48:39

Why We Can’t Get No Satisfaction

10/12/2018
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The self-help industry exists to make us think we could be living our best lives if only we tried a little harder and spent a little more. Heather Havrilesky joins us to make the case that we should embrace our imperfections and come to peace with the idea that maybe we are who we are for a reason. Her new collection of essays is called “What If This Were Enough?” (Doubleday).

Duration:00:48:40

How Trump Is Winning At Foreign Policy

10/11/2018
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Since his election, President Trump has been at odds with the United Nations, NATO and many of our traditional allies. Ohio State political scientist Randall Schweller joins us to explain how the president’s foreign policy strategy has bolstered the nation, which he writes about forForeign Affairs magazine.

Duration:00:48:38

You Might Not Be Alone In The Voting Booth

10/11/2018
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American democracy is dependent on the sanctity of the ballot box. So what happens if our election results come into question? Kim Zetter joins us to talk about how bad actors can actually tap into voting machines with relative ease – and about how the makers of voting machines are reluctant to even share how they work. Her story “The Crisis of Election Security” appeared recently in The New York Times magazine.

Duration:00:36:54

A Korean Kid, Her White Parents, And Why That Matters

10/10/2018
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Nicole Chung was raised by white parents in Oregon after her biological Korean parents placed her up for adoption. Chung joins us to tell the story of her search for her birth parents – and what that process taught her about her own identity – which she writes about in “All You Can Ever Know” (Catapult).

Duration:00:48:40

Democracy: Always Up For Debate

10/10/2018
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Democracy should be a pretty simple idea. But since its invention, societies have struggled with how to truly deliver power to the people. New School professor James Miller joins us to tell the stories of how cultures through the ages have tried – and often failed – to implement democracy, which he writes about in “Can Democracy Work? A Short History of a Radical Idea, from Ancient Athens to Our World” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux).

Duration:00:36:22

Nanny State Parenting

10/9/2018
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Parental decisions are often made not out of a sense of what’s best for the child, but instead out of fear of making a choice others will see as wrong. Kim Brooks has experiences that parental blowback, and she joins us to talk about raising kids in a judgmental world. Her new book is called “Small Animals: Parenthood in the Age of Fear” (Flatiron Books).

Duration:00:35:15

Cardiologists Get Heart Disease, Too

10/9/2018
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Today, open-heart surgery, pacemakers and even heart transplants feel fairly routine. Dr. Sandeep Jauhar joins us to take us back to a time when pioneering physicians risked their careers – and sometimes patients’ lives – to develop these lifesaving innovations. And he’ll talk about life as a cardiologist who suffers from heart disease. His new book is called “Heart: A History” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux).

Duration:00:48:28

When The Border Patrol Crosses The Line

10/8/2018
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More than 200 million Americans live in the “border zone,” defined by the Justice Department as the area within 100 air miles of any land or coastal boundary. And in that border zone, Congress has granted U.S. Customs and Border Protection broad powers. Melissa del Bosque joins us to talk about if that power needs to be reconsidered, which she writes about for Harper’s magazine.

Duration:00:48:35

Jose Antonio Vargas Could Be Deported At Any Moment

10/5/2018
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Pulitzer Prize-winner Jose Antonio Vargas has been called “the most famous undocumented immigrant in America.” He joins us to talk about what it’s like to live a life of uncertainty, always feeling as if you’re hiding in plain sight. His new book is called “Dear America: Notes from an Undocumented Citizen” (Dey St.).

Duration:00:48:39

To Truly Know America, She Left

10/4/2018
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Sometimes a little distance is helpful in trying to understand something. That was Suzy Hansen’s experience years after leaving America to live in Istanbul. She joins us to talk about witnessing American power and influence from an outsider’s perspective, which she writes about in “Notes on a Foreign Country: An American Abroad in a Post-American World” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux).

Duration:00:48:38

Why Are Fewer Black Americans Voting? They Can’t

10/4/2018
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In 2013, the Supreme Court struck down elements of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, angering those already worried about voter disenfranchisement. Carol Anderson, chair of African American Studies at Emory University, joins us to talk about how photo ID laws, gerrymandering and poll closures discriminate against people of color, which she writes about in “One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy” (Bloomsbury).

Duration:00:42:23

Will The Rio Run Dry?

10/3/2018
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Texas’ Rio Grande Valley is experiencing a population boom. And those additional people are putting a strain on the area’s natural resources – particularly water. Naveena Sadasivam joined *Think *at the studios of KUT in Austin to talk about how drought and heat waves are threatening the futures of the 6 million people who live in the valley, which she writes about for the Texas Observer.

Duration:00:48:40