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Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
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Location:

Dallas, TX

Description:

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Language:

English

Contact:

3000 Harry Hines Boulevard Dallas, Texas 75201 800-933-5372


Episodes

Fresh From The Lab: It’s Your Dinner

11/14/2018
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Humanity approaches pets and even endangered species with kindness. Jacy Reese joins us to talk about how the next step in expanding our morality is to extend that same compassion to animals we raise for food. His new book is called “The End of Animal Farming: How Scientists, Entrepreneurs, and Activists are Building an Animal-Free Food System” (Beacon Press).

Duration:00:48:48

Greed is Not Good – Here’s Why

11/13/2018
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CEOs and company boards have a duty to maximize shareholder profits. Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post columnist Steven Pearlstein joins us to talk about how this mission has widened the American wealth gap – and about how a return to one of Adam Smith’s key principles could be the solution. His new book is called “Can American Capitalism Survive?: Why Greed is not Good, Opportunity is not Equal, and Fairness Won’t Make Us Poor” (St. Martin’s Press).

Duration:00:48:40

The Best School Is Out There

11/12/2018
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We all want our kids to receive a good education. But what constitutes a “good education?” Ken Robinson joins us to talk about how parents can guide their children to the right school and see that they make the most of their time in the classroom. His most recent book is called “You, Your Child, and School: Navigate Your Way to the Best Education” (Viking).

Duration:00:48:38

The Unseen Creatures We Live With

11/9/2018
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Sterilize your kitchen counters all you want: You’ll never be rid of the thousands of tiny organisms who live alongside us. Biologist Rob Dunn joins us to introduce us to the creatures small and smaller who inhabit the same spaces we do. His new book is called “Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live” (Basic Books).

Duration:00:48:44

Developing Health Care In The Developing World

11/8/2018
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Sterilize your kitchen counters all you want: You’ll never be rid of the thousands of tiny organisms who live alongside us. Biologist Rob Dunn joins us to introduce us to the creatures small and smaller who inhabit the same spaces we do. His new book is called “Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live” (Basic Books).

Duration:00:48:38

Throwing Shade — The Shakespearean Way

11/8/2018
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Citizens of Elizabethan England had very particular ways of thumbing their noses at others – from well-timed zingers to strategic Shakespeare quotes. Historian Ruth Goodman joins us for a rollicking trip back to a low-brow time, the subject of her book “How to Behave Badly in Elizabethan England: A Guide for Knaves, Fools, Harlots, Cuckolds, Drunkards, Liars, Thieves, and Braggarts” (W.W. Norton and Co.).

Duration:00:48:40

The Balancing Act Of Black Women

11/7/2018
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Black women often find themselves in a no-win situation. Call out racism and risk being seen as an agitator, or stay quiet and feel like part of the problem. University of Washington, Seattle associate professor of communications Ralina L. Joseph joins us to talk about how prominent black women – and their everyday counterparts – walk this tightrope daily, the subject of her book “Postracial Resistance: Black Women, Media, and the Uses of Strategic Ambiguity” (NYU Press).

Duration:00:48:42

The Midterm Elections: What The Results Mean

11/7/2018
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Did the Democrats retake the House? Was Ted Cruz able to hold off Beto O’Rourke? This week, we finally get the answers to those long-simmering questions and many others. We talk about the major storylines of the midterm elections with Rebecca Deen, chair of the University of Texas at Arlington political science department, and Tony Carey Jr., associate professor of political science at the University of North Texas.

Duration:00:48:40

The Founding Fathers Weigh In On Politics Today

11/6/2018
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Between politicians and federal judges, public figures talk a lot about what the Founding Fathers intended in the words they wrote to form the nation. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph J. Ellis joins us to examine the thought processes of Washington, Jefferson, Madison and Adams to shed light on how they might view some of today’s most important questions. Ellis’ new book is called “American Dialogue: The Founders and Us” (Knopf).

Duration:00:48:41

The Literary Foundation Of Black Lives Matter

11/6/2018
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The Black Lives Matter movement was birthed by a hashtag just a few years ago. The call for equality and dignity, however, dates back much further. Johns Hopkins University philosopher Christopher J. Lebron joins us to walk through the history of American black intellectual thought — from Frederick Douglass and Langston Hughes to Zora Neal Hurston and James Baldwin. Lebron is the winner of this year’s Hiett Prize from the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture, and author most recently...

Duration:00:48:42

Why Learning To Read Is Still So Hard

11/5/2018
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Reading is one of the most studied aspects of human learning. And yet, students are rarely taught to read using scientifically proven methods. Emily Hanford, senior education correspondent for APM Reports, joins us to talk about why educators are failing kids when it comes to reading, the subject of her audio documentary “Hard Words: Why Aren’t Kids Being Taught to Read?”

Duration:00:48:40

An Hour Of Running With Peter Sagal

11/5/2018
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Every Saturday, public radio listeners tune into “Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me” to catch up on the week that was and have a few laughs. Host Peter Sagal travels the country with the show, and the one thing he never forgets to pack is his running shoes. He joins us to talk all things running, the subject of his new book “The Incomplete Book of Running” (Simon & Schuster).

Duration:00:48:38

Why Learning To Read Is Still So Hard

11/5/2018
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Reading is one of the most studied aspects of human learning. And yet, students are rarely taught to read using scientifically proven methods. Emily Hanford, senior education correspondent for APM Reports, joins us to talk about why educators are failing kids when it comes to reading, the subject of her audio documentary “Hard Words: Why Aren’t Kids Being Taught to Read?”

Duration:00:48:32

When American Politics Was Really Divisive

11/2/2018
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If you think Congress is a messy place now, you should’ve been there in the run-up to the Civil War. Yale history professor Joanne Freeman joins guest host John McCaa to talk about a time when pistols were routinely drawn and all-out brawls frequently erupted on the House floor. Her new book is called “The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux).

Duration:00:48:25

A Conversation With Ireland’s Ambassador To The U.S.

11/1/2018
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As Great Britain continues its Brexit negotiations with the E.U., one of the sticking points is the necessity for a physical border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. Daniel Mulhall, Ireland’s ambassador to the United States, joins us to talk about how Brexit will affect the country– and about the state of U.S.-Irish relation

Duration:00:48:39

What Single-Payer Health Care Might Really Look Like

11/1/2018
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Single-payer health care was one of Bernie Sanders’ campaign promises during his presidential run. And the baton has been picked up by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Beto O’Rourke and other prominent Democrats. Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal, editor-in-chief of Kaiser Health News, joins us to talk about the feasibility of the idea – and if it would even be better than the broken system we’re currently under. She wrote about the topic recently for The New York Times. Her latest book is “An American...

Duration:00:48:40

Gun Ownership: Why It’s Different For Black People

10/31/2018
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About a quarter of all African-Americans own a gun – and that number is on the rise. RJ Young is one of them, and he joins us to talk about his experience as an NRA-certified pistol instructor and about the differences between white and black gun culture. His new book is called “Let It Bang: A Young Black Man’s Reluctant Odyssey Into Guns” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt).

Duration:00:48:37

Have This Talk Before It’s Too Late

10/31/2018
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Death may be the one topic that nobody likes to talk about. Michael Hebb joins us to talk about why it’s important to engage with friends and loved ones about end-of-life wishes – and to offer practical tips for getting the conversation started. His new book is called “Let’s Talk About Death (Over Dinner): An Invitation and Guide to Life’s Most Important Conversation” (Da Capo).

Duration:00:48:39

The Ups And Downs Of Facebook

10/30/2018
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For the last decade, Facebook has helped people separated by physical distance to reconnect and remain close. And it’s also been the place where those same people have found themselves alienated from one another because of both real and fake news. James Jacoby talks with us about whether or not Facebook is a net positive for society, the subject of his two-part Frontline investigation “The Facebook Dilemma,” which airs Oct. 29-30 on PBS stations.

Duration:00:48:40

Why Safe Spaces Make Students Less Resilient

10/30/2018
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College campuses were once safe spaces for the exchange of ideas. These days, though, both professors and students often feel as if they’re walking on eggshells. We talk with social psychologist Jonathan Haidt to explain why we’re setting students up to fail when we overprotect them during these formative years. He’s a co-author of “The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure” (Penguin Press).

Duration:00:48:45