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Classical 89 is pleased to bring you thoughtful, educated voices in our radio interview program Thinking Aloud. As a service to the community at large, we offer regular interviews with scholars, students, and campus guests, on a broad range of topics.

Classical 89 is pleased to bring you thoughtful, educated voices in our radio interview program Thinking Aloud. As a service to the community at large, we offer regular interviews with scholars, students, and campus guests, on a broad range of topics.
More Information

Location:

Provo, UT

Description:

Classical 89 is pleased to bring you thoughtful, educated voices in our radio interview program Thinking Aloud. As a service to the community at large, we offer regular interviews with scholars, students, and campus guests, on a broad range of topics.

Language:

English

Contact:

BYU Broadcasting Brigham Young University Provo, UT 84602 800-298-5298


Episodes

Joseph Crespino: The Evolution of Atticus Finch

6/18/2018
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Joseph Crespino, the Jimmy Carter Professor of History at Emory University, traces the origins and evolution of Atticus Finch, the iconic patriarch from Harper Lee's seminal novel.

Duration:00:28:29

Randall Stephens: How Christians Came to Embrace Rock & Roll

6/15/2018
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Randall Stephens, professor of history and American studies, traces the history of Christian rock from its beginning as "the devil's music" to a billion dollar industry.

Duration:00:28:29

Neda Maghbouleh: Iranian Americans and the Politics of Race

6/14/2018
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Sociologist Neda Maghbouleh joins the show to discuss her research into how second-generation Iranian Americans navigate the paradox between being legally classified as white and socially perceived as nonwhite.

Duration:00:28:44

Leslie Anthony: The Aliens Among Us

6/13/2018
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Adventure and science journalist Leslie Anthony discusses his research into invasive species and the effect they're having on the planet.

Duration:00:27:00

Jeremy Teigen: The History of Veterans as Presidents

6/11/2018
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Political scientist Jeremy Teigen explores the history of military service and the U.S. presidency and discusses how the status of being a veteran has helped or hindered presidential hopefuls.

Duration:00:28:14

Amaranth Borsuk: The Past and Future of the Book

6/8/2018
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Whether you think it's on its way out or a permanent fixture in our culture, there's no denying that we're fascinated with books. Poet and scholar Amaranth Borsuk joins the show to explore the limits and possibilities of the book as object, as content, and as idea.

Duration:00:28:29

Adam Winkler: How Corporations Won Their Civil Rights

6/7/2018
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The Virgina Company. The Fourteenth Amendment. Dodge v Ford Motor Co. Ralph Nader. Mitt Romney. UCLA law professor Adam Winkler talks through the characters and cases that helped business corporations gain rights under the Constitution.

Duration:00:28:29

Mark Serreze: A Scientist's Account of the Changing Arctic (rebroadcast)

6/6/2018
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Mark Serreze, director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center, describes how the science on climate change has changed throughout his career and details his own experiences witnessing those changes on the ground in the Arctic. —Original Airdate: 5/18/2018 8:00:00 PM

Duration:00:28:30

Bruce Fink: Jacques Lacan on the Illusions of Love (rebroadcast)

6/4/2018
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Lacanian psychoanalyst Bruce Fink visits the show to discuss Jacques Lacan's thoughts and writing on love. —Original Airdate: 1/11/2018 8:00:00 PM

Duration:00:29:29

Daniel Levitin: A Field Guide to Lies--Critical Thinking in the Information Age (rebroadcast)

6/1/2018
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As technological advancement leads us to confront an ever-larger bombardment of information, we have to ask ourselves: which of all this information is true or accurate? Today's guest believes we can tell the difference between solid data and media junk if we learn how. He's here to help us begin that important process of learning discernment amid an ocean of media. —Original Airdate: 9/14/2016 8:00:00 PM

Duration:00:29:12

Darrin Lunde: Theodore Roosevelt, The Naturalist (rebroadcast)

5/25/2018
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Marcus Smith speaks with Smithsonian naturalist Darrin Lunde about Theodore Roosevelt's lesser-known passion for the science of naturalism. —Original Airdate: 6/28/2017 8:00:00 PM

Duration:00:28:35

Kathryn Tempest: Retelling the Story of Brutus

5/24/2018
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Kathryn Tempest, senior lecturer on Roman history at the University of Roehampton London and author of "Brutus: The Noble Conspirator," joins the show to talk about how we know what we know about Marcus Junius Brutus and his infamous assassination of Julius Caesar.

Duration:00:28:44

Daniel Horowitz: A Historian's Take on Positive Psychology

5/23/2018
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Historian Daniel Horowitz, author of the book "Happier? The History of a Cultural Movement That Aspired to Transform America," discusses the results of America's draw towards positive psychology and the happiness.

Duration:00:28:15

Henrik Syse: Finding Connection through Memory (rebroadcast)

5/21/2018
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Philosopher Henrik Syse shares his thoughts about using the memory of trauma to form universal connections rather than fuel conflict. —Original Airdate: 4/12/2018 8:00:00 PM

Duration:00:28:30

John Branch: Ranching and Rodeo in the American West

5/17/2018
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Competitive bronc riding is still alive and mostly well in some corners of the United States, and one family, as a three-generation dynasty, has dominated this colorful sport for decades: the Wrights of Southern Utah. We’re joined by John Branch, author of “The Last Cowboys: A Pioneer Family in the New West.” Can there ever be another Wright family, or are they really the last cowboys?

Duration:00:27:57

Daniel Chambliss & Christopher Takacs: The Secrets to College Success

5/14/2018
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Daniel Chambliss and Christopher Takacs, authors of "How College Works," join the show to talk about their research into the surprising and not-so-surprising factors that create a successful college experience.

Duration:00:27:57

Jeanne Theoharis: The Misuses of Civil Rights History (rebroadcast)

5/10/2018
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Political science professor Jeanne Theoharis, author of "A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History," joins the show to look at the ways we often misrepresent civil rights history and discusses how those misconceptions affect our present. —Original Airdate: 4/2/2018 8:00:00 PM

Duration:00:28:19

Kieran Setiya: Philosophy for Midlife (rebroadcast)

5/7/2018
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MIT philosophy professor Kieran Setiya, author of "Midlife: A Philosophical Guide," shares his wisdom for dealing with the questions that surround a midlife crisis. —Original Airdate: 4/19/2018 8:00:00 PM

Duration:00:28:58

Andrew Ruis: The Origins of School Lunch (rebroadcast)

5/4/2018
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School lunch has never been just a midday meal. Andrew Ruis, author of Eating to Learn, Learning to Eat: The Origins of School Lunch in the United States, joins us to talk about the social, political, and economic concerns that gave rise to school lunch in its present form. —Original Airdate: 12/6/2017 8:00:00 PM

Duration:00:28:44

Steven Teles & Brink Lindsey: Retaking a Captured Economy (rebroadcast)

5/3/2018
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Unprecedented inequality and slow growth: those are the symptoms of our current economic situation. But what's the disease? Steven Teles and Brink Lindsey, authors of the book The Captured Economy: How the Powerful Enrich Themselves, Slow Down Growth, and Increase Inequality, join the show to discuss how seemingly innocuous government regulations have created unfair advantage for those at the top and what we can do to recapture the economy for all. —Original Airdate: 12/29/2017 8:00:00 PM

Duration:00:28:30