Economist Radio-logo

Economist Radio

The Economist

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.
More Information

Location:

London, United Kingdom

Networks:

The Economist

Description:

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

Language:

English


Episodes

Battle for legitimacy: Afghanistan v the Taliban

5/20/2019
More
After 18 years and almost a trillion dollars to fight the Taliban, Afghanistan’s government still struggles for legitimacy; we ask why. A list of the world’s ultra-rich reveals a disproportionate number of self-made female billionaires from China—but the trend isn’t set to continue. And we examine why presidential libraries are so controversial, and why Barack Obama’s is no exception.

Duration:00:22:18

The Economist asks: Cass Sunstein

5/17/2019
More
Anne McElvoy asks Cass Sunstein, a former advisor to Barack Obama and co-author of "Nudge", how far the state should define our quest for personal freedom. They discuss how we might need a GPS to navigate through life, the limits of nudging and why left-wing Democrats might be their own worst enemy

Duration:00:23:23

Private iniquity? The Abraaj case

5/17/2019
More
Not long ago, Abraaj was one of the world’s highest-profile private-equity firms. We take a look at its spectacular downfall, and the fate of its charismatic boss, Arif Naqvi. This weekend Australian voters will elect a new parliament. How can politicians win back a disillusioned electorate? And why do sausages figure so strongly on voting day?

Duration:00:21:05

Editor’s Picks: May 16th 2019

5/16/2019
More
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, as the rivalry between China and the United States grows, surging sanctions create both risks and unexpected business opportunities. Why the feeble Afghan government is losing the war against the Taliban (10’23). And a tale of golden fleeces—why people in Senegal pay a fortune for fancy sheep (20’19)

Duration:00:23:43

May, EU live in interesting times: Brexit

5/16/2019
More
As party leaders grill Britain’s prime minister—and with a looming European election the country was due to avoid—we examine how the Brexit mess is dissolving party allegiances. Turkey was once seen as a success story in dealing with Syrians fleeing conflict, but as war has dragged on their welcome is wearing thin. And, kinky and camp meet fraught politics in this year’s Eurovision Song Contest. Additional music "Thoughtful" and "Under Suspicion" by Lee Rosevere.

Duration:00:21:16

Babbage: Facing the future?

5/15/2019
More
Legislators in San Francisco have just voted to ban the use of facial recognition—is this a victory for privacy or a setback for technology? Also, new research on how machine learning can be used to predict the likelihood of breast cancer. And Amazon's boss, Jeff Bezos, draws inspiration from science fiction in his aim to build space habitats. Kenneth Cukier hosts

Duration:00:21:50

Don’t spend it all at once: Pakistan and the IMF

5/15/2019
More
The International Monetary Fund has struck another deal to bail out Pakistan—its 22nd. But how did the country’s economy end up in such a mess? Never mind rising numbers of vegetarians: the world is eating more meat, and in a way, that’s a good thing. And, how French names reveal social trends that census data cannot.

Duration:00:21:47

Money talks: A US-China game of nerves

5/14/2019
More
Two-way trade between America and China hit $2bn a day last year. But the growing mistrust between the two countries is turning business from a safe space into a field of contention. David Rennie, The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, has travelled across both countries and found that, with China’s daunting rise, making money is no longer enough to keep friendly relations.

Duration:00:26:58

Supply demands: Yemen peace talks

5/14/2019
More
UN negotiators are trying to salvage a ceasefire agreement surrounding the Yemeni port city of Hodeidah. The Arab world’s poorest country is suffering mightily, but the patchwork of actors makes a successful deal ever more difficult. In Latin America, democracy has stalled as economies have stagnated. Yet for democracy to succeed elsewhere, its Latin American shoots must be preserved. And, a splashy apartment building in Bulgaria that’s become emblematic of graft. Additional music "Chez...

Duration:00:23:34

Spare the Rodrigo: Philippine elections

5/13/2019
More
Personalities, not policies, will determine votes in today’s poll in the Philippines to fill some 18,000 government jobs. Loyalists of the firebrand president Rodrigo Duterte—including his daughter—will do well. Also, why is it that amid a growing need for new antibiotics, the incentives to produce them are fewer? And, a trip to the tiny Greek island of Delos, for an unusual meeting of modern art and protected antiquity. Runtime: 21min

Duration:00:21:53

The Economist asks: Melinda Gates

5/10/2019
More
Anne McElvoy asks Melinda Gates whether gender equality starts in the kitchen. The American philanthropist explains why the tech world risks entrenching bias into the future, but defends the Gates Foundation’s decision to halve its paid family leave. And Anne and Melinda swap top tips for getting teenagers to do the washing up

Duration:00:20:12

Unbalance of trade: China-America talks

5/10/2019
More
Negotiations to end the trade war have been ruffled as the Trump administration again ramped up tariffs. But even if a deal is struck, that won’t address serious systemic troubles in the countries’ relationship. Many diets rely on simply counting calories, but the truth is that the scientific-sounding measure is mightily misleading. And, as Uber goes public, we take an instructive ride through historic disruptions of the taxi industry.

Duration:00:22:47

Editor’s Picks: May 9th 2019

5/9/2019
More
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, our cover story reports on the brewing conflict between America and Iran. Both sides need to step back. Also, why the Mexican-American population is shrinking, despite headlines from the southern border (10:05). And, what the latest trends in baby names say about how France is changing (17:34)

Duration:00:21:50

Generals’ election: Thai politics

5/9/2019
More
The military junta that runs Thailand almost completely sewed up a momentous vote—almost. After further electoral meddling the generals will now lead a weak government, with a surging youth-led party nipping at their heels. As Russia intensifies bombings in Idlib, the last stronghold of Syrian rebels, we examine how Russia’s involvement in Syria has expanded its role in the Middle East. And, a visit with the soldier-poets of Guinea-Bissau.

Duration:00:21:52

Babbage: Uber traffic

5/8/2019
More
As Uber prepares for its public listing this week, a new study in San Francisco shows that ride-hailing companies cause major road congestion. Also, how much should smart speakers see as well as hear? And, author Douglas Rushkoff explains why he views modern technology as anti-human. Kenneth Cukier hosts

Duration:00:21:39

Nuclear diffusion: Iran

5/8/2019
More
Exactly a year after President Donald Trump pulled America out of the Iran nuclear deal—and days after America moved warships into the Persian Gulf—Iran has announced it will break the terms of the deal. Is it more than just sabre-rattling? We examine an impressive new effort to get inside the minds of those unable to speak. And, why is it that British food gets such a bad rap? The answer stretches back to the Industrial Revolution.

Duration:00:21:28

Money talks: Tech’s raid on the banks

5/7/2019
More
Digital disruption is coming to banking at last. Helen Joyce travels across Asia to see how fintechs like Ant Financial are transforming how people spend, save and invest their money, and asks whether traditional banks can catch up. Who will win the battle to be the bank of the future? And could having a bank in your pocket make your money safer?

Duration:00:24:00

Mayor may not: Turkey’s election re-run

5/7/2019
More
Turkey’s ruling AK party never conceded defeat in Istanbul’s mayoral election in March. Now the result has been annulled, worrying the opposition and international observers. A China-America trade deal has been thrown into doubt thanks to a presidential tweet, but one senator is warning of a grave danger that transcends tit-for-tat tariffs. And, why there’s a growing feminist contingent in a genre of Brazilian music known for its misogyny.

Duration:00:22:14

Everything in moderation: YouTube

5/6/2019
More
Susan Wojcicki, YouTube’s chief executive, tells our correspondent that moderating the streaming giant’s content is her biggest challenge. No wonder: every minute, 500 hours-worth of it is added. Also, how West African research is being used to address gun violence in Chicago. And a look at the declining number of royal families, and why some that have survived will stick around.

Duration:00:24:09

The Economist asks: Bret Easton Ellis

5/3/2019
More
Anne McElvoy asks author and iconoclast Bret Easton Ellis about why he has decided to take on the social mores of millennials. From the #metoo movement and freedom of expression to anger on social media, he discusses the dangers of a growing generational disconnect. And he apologises for claiming millennials don’t care about literature

Duration:00:27:26