KQED's Forum-logo

KQED's Forum

KQED

Forum tells remarkable and true stories about who we are and where we live. In the first hour, Alexis Madrigal convenes the diverse voices of the Bay Area, before turning to Mina Kim for the second hour to chronicle and center Californians’ experience. In an increasingly divided world, Mina and Alexis host conversations that inform, challenge and unify listeners with big ideas and different viewpoints. Want to call/submit your comments during our live Forum program Mon-Fri, 9am-11am? We'd love to hear from you! Please dial 866.SF.FORUM or (866) 733-6786 or email forum@kqed.org, tweet, or post on Facebook.

Forum tells remarkable and true stories about who we are and where we live. In the first hour, Alexis Madrigal convenes the diverse voices of the Bay Area, before turning to Mina Kim for the second hour to chronicle and center Californians’ experience. In an increasingly divided world, Mina and Alexis host conversations that inform, challenge and unify listeners with big ideas and different viewpoints. Want to call/submit your comments during our live Forum program Mon-Fri, 9am-11am? We'd love to hear from you! Please dial 866.SF.FORUM or (866) 733-6786 or email forum@kqed.org, tweet, or post on Facebook.

Location:

San Francisco, CA

Networks:

KQED

Description:

Forum tells remarkable and true stories about who we are and where we live. In the first hour, Alexis Madrigal convenes the diverse voices of the Bay Area, before turning to Mina Kim for the second hour to chronicle and center Californians’ experience. In an increasingly divided world, Mina and Alexis host conversations that inform, challenge and unify listeners with big ideas and different viewpoints. Want to call/submit your comments during our live Forum program Mon-Fri, 9am-11am? We'd love to hear from you! Please dial 866.SF.FORUM or (866) 733-6786 or email forum@kqed.org, tweet, or post on Facebook.

Language:

English


Episodes

'Love on the Spectrum' Celebrates the Beauty – and Challenges – of Neurodiverse Dating

5/17/2022
Dating, for everyone, is full of tricky social conventions. How long should you wait to call someone after getting their number? Who should cover the dinner bill? And navigating some of these situations can be extra difficult for autistic people. Netflix’s new season of “Love on the Spectrum,” an American version of the Australian docuseries, produced by Northern Pictures, premieres on Wednesday and explores the unique hurdles – and joys – that autistic people face when entering the dating...

Duration:00:52:51

Murder, Corruption, Coverups: the Strange Dark History of Stanford University

5/17/2022
Jane Stanford and her robber baron husband Leland founded what would become Stanford University in 1885. 20 years later Jane Stanford was murdered, poisoned by strychnine. Historian Richard White dives into the corruption and coverups shrouding the unsolved murder in his new book, “Who Killed Jane Stanford?” His book is both a true crime mystery and a history of the corruption, inequality, yellow journalism, pseudo-science and racism of California’s Gilded Age. Forum talks with White about...

Duration:00:52:50

How Hateful Ideology Fuels Hate Crimes

5/16/2022
Barely a day after a gunman killed 10 people at a Buffalo, New York, grocery store in a predominantly Black neighborhood, another gunman at a church service for a Taiwanese congregation in Laguna Woods, California, killed one person and injured several others. “This should not be our new normal,” said Orange County representative Katie Porter. And yet, these incidents and their impacts feel all too familiar: Communities of color feeling unspeakable grief and terror. We’ll discuss the...

Duration:00:52:56

Forum Debuts Its New Theme Song

5/16/2022
For about a quarter century, KQED Forum listeners have been getting dressed, brushing their teeth and driving to work to the sounds of “Peter Pan” by musician Mike Marshall. On Monday, they will have a new soundtrack. Each hour of the show is getting its own new theme song, composed by NPR’s Ramtin Arablouei. To mark the occasion, we’ll talk about what makes a great theme song, including the best TV themes through the decades. And we’ll open the phone lines to ask our listeners: What TV...

Duration:00:52:54

A.J. Jacobs on the Joy of Puzzling

5/13/2022
Jigsaws, crosswords, Sudokus, cryptics and even scavenger hunts: A.J. Jacobs is convinced that puzzles of all kinds have made him a better person. In his new book, “The Puzzler,” Jacobs takes readers along as he enters all manner of puzzle competitions, talks to puzzle makers and solvers and looks at the history of some of the most popular puzzles around. His book also has embedded within it a specially crafted puzzle with a $10,000 prize for the first person to solve it. We’ll talk to...

Duration:00:53:01

Dancing and Crying with Singer-Songwriter Sean Hayes

5/13/2022
Bay Area singer-songwriter Sean Hayes has been singing the blues for the last 30 years, but his music seems especially necessary these days. “Pain, suffering, worry meet pain again,” he sings on his newly released album “Be Like Water.” Hayes describes himself as a songwriter who “makes music to dance to or cry to, or maybe both at the same time.” He joins us in the studio to play live from his new album.

Duration:00:39:09

Choreographer Alonzo King on 40 Years of LINES Ballet

5/13/2022
"Any kind of comfort or satisfaction is poisonous to any kind of growth,” choreographer Alonzo King told Forum ten years ago on the 30th anniversary of his company LINES Ballet. “You want to expand your heart and expand your mind. And that wants to continue going until you leave the planet,” he said. Now, with his 40th anniversary ballet “Deep River” opening at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on Friday, King joins Forum to talk about his expansive career and the process of making art in...

Duration:00:52:19

Has the Leaked Roe Opinion Damaged the Supreme Court’s Legitimacy?

5/12/2022
According to a recent survey by Pew Research, the majority of Americans favor abortion rights. But in the leaked draft opinion overturning Roe v. Wade, Justice Samuel A. Alito writes “We cannot allow our decisions to be affected by any extraneous influences such as concern about the public’s reaction to our work.” Public reaction, however, has been swift. Demonstrators decrying the opinion have gathered outside the Supreme Court, the homes of Supreme Court justices and in demonstrations...

Duration:00:43:25

What It Takes to Make SRO Hotels Run Well

5/12/2022
Last Thursday, we spoke with San Francisco Chronicle reporters about their yearlong investigation into the city-funded single-room-occupancy buildings that are supposed to provide supportive housing for the homeless. In this show, we’ll get an inside look from staff that run SROs and the nonprofit operators that oversee them. Some operators say the city hasn’t given them adequate resources and funding to serve their tenants, who often struggle with drug and behavioral issues. Meanwhile,...

Duration:00:53:00

Elizabeth Alexander on 'The Trayvon Generation'

5/11/2022
What does it mean for a generation of young people to come of age seeing other young Black people routinely endangered, attacked or killed? In her new book of essays titled “The Trayvon Generation,” poet, scholar and educator Elizabeth Alexander explores that question and meditates on the persistence of racism in the American experience. She writes that “the race work of the generations of my great-grandparents, my grandparents, my parents, and myself is the work of our children’s...

Duration:00:52:51

SF District Attorney Chesa Boudin Argues Against His Recall

5/11/2022
On June 7, San Francisco voters will decide whether to recall District Attorney Chesa Boudin. It’s a ballot fight that pits the former public defender’s progressive ideas on criminal justice reform against claims that he’s soft on criminals and has made San Francisco’s streets more dangerous. Boudin joins us to talk about his record and what he thinks his opponents get wrong, crime in San Francisco and why he thinks he should stay in office.

Duration:00:52:53

Craig McNamara Confronts His Father’s Legacy in ‘Because Our Fathers Lied’

5/10/2022
Robert McNamara was president of the Ford Motor Company, head of the World Bank, U.S. Secretary of Defense and widely considered to be the architect of the Vietnam War. He was also a father. His son, Craig McNamara, depicts their strained, yet love-filled, relationship in his new book, “Because Our Fathers Lied,” which explores the wall that existed between them as a result of Craig’s deep opposition to the Vietnam War. We’ll talk with McNamara about what it means to carve out his own legacy...

Duration:00:52:52

Julissa Arce Rejects Assimilation in 'You Sound Like a White Girl'

5/10/2022
When a classmate in junior high school told Julissa Arce, an immigrant from Mexico, that she sounded like a white girl, she took it as a compliment. “Sounding like a white girl gave me a false sense of security. Having an accent said I was from someplace else; sounding like a white girl fooled me into thinking I could belong in the United States,” she writes in her new book, “You Sound Like A White Girl: The Case for Rejecting Assimilation.” Writer, speaker, and immigration rights advocate,...

Duration:00:52:53

Women Who Have Had Abortions Reflect on a World Without Roe

5/9/2022
The decision to terminate a pregnancy is rarely easy, and the reasons women choose abortions are varied. Some are already parents who don’t want another child. Some feel too young to become a parent. Some can’t bear to birth a child conceived in sexual violence. Some are afraid of the risks of pregnancy. And some, simply, don’t want to be pregnant. As Americans' nearly 50-year old constitutional right to an abortion approaches its probable end, we hear from women across the state who have...

Duration:00:52:11

How to Make Sense of the Weird U.S. Economy

5/9/2022
Various economic factors don’t seem to add up these days. Consumer spending is up year over year, but the country’s gross domestic product fell during the first quarter. Home values are higher than ever in many cities across, but 401k balances are taking a hit from stock market declines. Wages are finally inching up for some workers, but inflation is taking a bite out of purchasing power. Employers continue adding jobs, but worker participation in the workforce hasn’t bounced back. We dive...

Duration:00:52:51

Plato, Kant and … Six-Year-Olds? Scott Hershovitz Celebrates A Child's Inner Philosopher

5/6/2022
“Mommy, I don’t know what red looks like to you.” That’s the first philosophical puzzle that Scott Hershovitz says he remembers putting to his befuddled parents. And it’s children’s observations like those that Hershovitz, now a full-grown philosophy professor, says that parents need to nurture and take seriously. We’ll talk to Hershovitz about why young kids, unencumbered by received wisdom about the universe, make excellent philosophers and how childlike thinking can teach all of us to...

Duration:00:52:53

From Red Sauce to Cioppino: How Italian American Food Became Synonymous with America’s — and the Bay Area’s — Cuisine

5/6/2022
The Italian food many Americans grew up with — often called “red sauce” cuisine — is influenced by Italian traditions, “but it is not Italian food,” writes Ian MacAllen, author of “Red Sauce: How Italian Food Became American.” This distinction between Italian and Italian American food evolved from the story of Italian immigration to America — one where pizza and pasta ended up becoming synonymous with American food itself. The Bay Area’s own wine, tomato sauce and cioppino stems from the...

Duration:00:52:55

How Did We Get Here and Where Are We Going in a Post-Roe World

5/5/2022
The leaked draft Supreme Court opinion overturning Roe v. Wade has sent shock waves across the country, particularly for those who assumed their 50-year old constitutional right to abortion was safe. But court watchers long have predicted this outcome, brought on by the decades-long efforts of Christian fundamentalists and other far-right actors to remake the Republican party. We'll talk about the political forces that brought us to this moment and the other core privacy rights -- from...

Duration:00:52:57

Despite Millions in City Funding, Investigation Finds Squalid Conditions at SF SROs

5/5/2022
A year-long San Francisco Chronicle investigation found that a San Francisco program that leases residential hotels as a transitional solution for unhoused residents has failed drastically. According to the investigation, many residents reported living in squalid rooms infested with bugs, rats, and black mold. Reporters found that, of 515 people tracked by the government, 21% returned to the streets and a quarter died in the program. They also found that violence toward residents and staff,...

Duration:00:52:11

Danica Roem Champions Authenticity in Politics in 'Burn the Page'

5/4/2022
Danica Roem stunned the world of Virginia politics in 2017 when she became the first openly trans person to win a seat in a state legislature. She defeated a Republican who held the seat for more than a quarter century -- a lawmaker who called himself the state’s "chief homophobe." Roem, who's also a former journalist and thrash metal band front woman, joins us to talk about her new memoir "Burn the Page," all about her unlikely rise in politics and the importance of being your authentic...

Duration:00:39:00