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Nine to Noon

RNZ New Zealand

Every weekday, Kathryn Ryan canvases breaking news, backgrounds social and economic issues, and discusses lifestyle trends, with the help of newsmakers, correspondents, and experts in every imaginable field from writers and reviewers to ordinary New Zealanders.

Every weekday, Kathryn Ryan canvases breaking news, backgrounds social and economic issues, and discusses lifestyle trends, with the help of newsmakers, correspondents, and experts in every imaginable field from writers and reviewers to ordinary New Zealanders.
More Information

Location:

Wellington, New Zealand

Description:

Every weekday, Kathryn Ryan canvases breaking news, backgrounds social and economic issues, and discusses lifestyle trends, with the help of newsmakers, correspondents, and experts in every imaginable field from writers and reviewers to ordinary New Zealanders.

Twitter:

@ninetonoon

Language:

English


Episodes

Pacific reaction to Australia's election result

5/23/2019
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RNZ Pacific journalist Koro Vaka'uta with a wrap of reaction from Pacific nations to Scott Morrison's coalition win in Australia. And the first visit to the Pacific of United Nations Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres.

Duration:00:06:54

Gagana Samoa Children's books

5/23/2019
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Wainuiomata's Dahlia Malaeulu is a teacher, an advocate for Sāmoa and Pasifika education and also an author. She has written series of children's books Milas' My Gagana. The first three of the six part series have just been released. Dahlia speaks to Kathryn about how her own children inspired her to create reading material which reflects Pasifika values, languages, cultures and tamaiti. Next week is Samoan language week.

Duration:00:13:09

Queenstown accommodation providers fear outcome of bed tax vote

5/23/2019
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Queenstown accommodation providers are fearful of the outcome of the referendum currently underway on a bed tax for tourists. Voting forms are pouring in as rate payers in the Queenstown Lakes District decide whether to support or oppose a 5% visitor levy. This would would raise $22.5million a year to ease the burden of infrastructure on ratepayers. Nick Kiddle represents 130 accommodation businesses in the district - from large hotels to small family B&Bs. He says applying a new tax to just...

Duration:00:18:59

Last minute landlords: insulation providers can't meet demand

5/23/2019
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Insulation providers say they're seeing a last minute rush of landlords wanting rental properties insulated by the government's deadline of July 1, and there's no way they can meet the demand in time. When the new law comes into force, all rental properties will have to have floor and ceiling insulation where it is possible. Landlords who fail to insulate will be subject to a penalty of up to $4,000, if the tenant applies to the Tenancy Tribunal. The Tenancy Compliance and Investigations...

Duration:00:11:49

Post-war movies: The Aftermath and Cold War

5/22/2019
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Film and TV reviewer Lara Strongman looks at post-war drama The Aftermath starring Keira Knightly, Jason Clarke and Alexander Skarsgard and Cold War, a historical period drama film set in Poland and France between the late 1940s and 1960s.

Duration:00:08:08

Tips for raising independent kids

5/22/2019
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CEO of Spectrum Education Karen Boyes says the job of mums and dads is to ensure that kids can parent themselves by age 18 - and that one day, they leave home! She says the path towards this starts as early as two years old.

Duration:00:23:47

One year on - the GDPR's unexpected benefit

5/22/2019
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Tech correspondent Mark Pesce looks at how legislation to tighten data protection in the EU has had an unexpected benefit to everybody - and what that might mean for the success of the Christchurch Call.

Duration:00:17:02

Book review - Everything is F*cked: A Book About Hope

5/22/2019
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Phil Vine reviews Everything is F*cked: A Book About Hope by Mark Manson, which is published by HarperCollins.

Duration:00:06:40

The honey bus: A memoir from a girl saved by bees

5/22/2019
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Journalist and author Meredith May was just five when her parents divorced and her mother took them to live with her grandparents. As her mother retreated into herself, Meredith spent much of her time with her beekeeping grandfather learning about the secret life of bees. Only later did she realise what her grandpa was teaching her about bees were life lessons as well. Meredith joins Kathryn to share her passion for honeybees and looks at their imperilled state in a world of concrete and...

Duration:00:26:04

15 years of the Pacific Music Awards

5/22/2019
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In 2005 the Pacific Music Awards moved from under the New Zealand Music Awards and struck out on their own. What's changed within Pacific music in that time? Kathryn talks to someone who's been there from the beginning: Rev. Mua Strickson-Pua. He's a Trustee of the Awards and has seen a number of Pacific artists' careers take off.

Duration:00:13:20

Toxic debate: Is methyl bromide use back on the table?

5/22/2019
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Sixteen months out from a deadline to effectively ban the use of methyl bromide as a fumigant in the export log industry, the Environmental Protection Agency or EPA is to undertake a reassessment of its use. It's an ozone depleting gas that's toxic to humans, and by October 2020 is only to be used in conjunction with recapture technology. An application for use of an alternative, ethanedinitrile or EDN, is still underway after 2 years - and while it's not as bad for the environment, it still...

Duration:00:22:40

Brexit to Trexit? Commons leader quits after May holds on

5/22/2019
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UK correspondent Matt Dathan joins us for the latest in British politics: leader of the House of Commons Andrea Leadsom has resigned after Prime Minister Theresa May resisted pressure on her to step aside. Leadsom's resignation followed a backlash from Conservative MPs against Theresa May's Brexit plan - she's the 36th minister to resign under May's tenure.

Duration:00:15:24

Octopus farm, bacteria-busting viruses and old bedbugs

5/21/2019
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11:45 Octopus farm, bacteria-busting viruses and old bedbugs Science commentator Siouxsie Wiles looks at why researchers believe we shouldn't farm octopuses, how a 15-year-old cystic fibrosis patient had her chronic infection treated using genetically-engineered bacteria-busting viruses and bedbugs are 50 million years older than previously thought. [image_crop:80290:full] Associate Professor Dr Siouxsie Wiles is the head of Bioluminescent Superbugs Lab at the University of Auckland.

Duration:00:10:53

NZIFF: a close-up on Marten Rabarts

5/21/2019
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In October, Marten Rabarts takes over from Bill Gosden as Director of the New Zealand International Film Festival. Marten, who was born in the Coromandel and is of Ngati Porou and Ngapuhi descent, has worked in many aspects of film and film making, including in the Indian and Dutch film industries - where he's seeing out his remaining months as head of EYE International, which enhances the profile of films made in the Netherlands to the rest of the world. He's also been creating...

Duration:00:15:14

The music of 1994

5/21/2019
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It's 25 years since some of the most seminal albums of modern times were released. Music commentator Yadana Saw looks back at the memorable, the local...and the forgettable.

Duration:00:25:34

Book review - The Unreliable People by Rosetta Allan

5/21/2019
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Louise O'Brien from quarterly review periodical New Zealand Review of Books Pukapuka Aotearoa reviews The Unreliable People by Rosetta Allan, which is published by Penguin Books New Zealand.

Duration:00:05:53

Stephanie Johnson: our complex relationship with Australia

5/21/2019
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Award winning writer Stephanie Johnson talks with Kathryn Ryan about her new non-fiction book, West Island, a portrait of five twentieth-century New Zealanders who found fame and notoriety in Australia but were largely forgotten in their country of origin. Stephanie Johnson has strong ties with Australia, she spent much of her 20s there, and her husband is Australian. In West Island she draws on her experience of life on both sides of the ditch and reflects on the differences that set the...

Duration:00:31:08

Election fallout: tax cuts, Labor leadership and the Adani mine

5/21/2019
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Australia correspondent Donna Field joins Kathryn to look at the fallout from the election; what's happening with planned tax cuts, who's in the running to take over the Labor leadership from Bill Shorten and with a coalition win, the Adani coal project is firmly back on the agenda.

Duration:00:06:15

Can a computer model accurately identify kids at risk of abuse?

5/21/2019
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Kathryn speaks with Stanford University Associate Professor of Medicine, Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, who has evaluated the effectiveness of a predictive risk assessment tool developed by a New Zealand researcher and implemented for two years in the United States. The Ministry of Social development originally commissioned Professor Rhema Vaithianathan, Co-Director of the Centre for Social Data Analytics at AUT to develop the model. It uses data about children and their families to identify...

Duration:00:11:46

Consumer watchdog retires from duty

5/21/2019
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Dr Mark Berry will stand down as chairman of the country's consumer and competition watchdog after 10 years at the helm. He joins Kathryn to talk about how the Commerce Commission has been using its expanded powers to conduct market studies, some of the tougher determinations during his tenure and what areas he thinks still need tighter regulation.

Duration:00:22:19