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PBS NewsHour - Segments

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Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.
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United States

Description:

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Language:

English


Episodes

As world leaders gather in France, how Trump has changed the G-7

8/23/2019
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Friday's new turmoil around the U.S. economy and trade war with China is coming at an important moment for President Trump, immediately preceding his arrival at the G-7 summit in France. Reporting from France, Yamiche Alcindor joins Judy Woodruff to discuss why other world leaders are now "even more anxious" about their upcoming interactions with Trump and what priorities are on their agendas.

Duration:00:03:40

News Wrap: Democracy supporters in Hong Kong form human chain extending 25 miles

8/23/2019
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In our news wrap Friday, democracy advocates in Hong Kong formed a human chain stretching 25 miles to show solidarity and appeal for international support. It was inspired by a human chain in the Baltic states 30 years ago that protested Soviet rule. Also, the Assad regime secured another victory in its long fight to reclaim control of Syria, seizing territory near the last major rebel stronghold.

Duration:00:08:15

International pressure mounts for Brazil to counter raging Amazon fires

8/23/2019
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Large sections of the Amazon rainforest are engulfed in flames, their smoke turning Sao Paolo's midday skyline to total darkness. Brazilian forest fires are common at this time of year but have spiked since 2018. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, who has encouraged logging in the Amazon, admits the situation is "chaos" and is mustering the military for a response. William Brangham reports.

Duration:00:02:24

How did David Koch shape money in American politics?

8/23/2019
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Billionaire and conservative mega donor David Koch has died. After expanding the Kansas-based Koch Industries into one of the world's largest privately held corporations, Koch and his brother contributed hundreds of millions to GOP candidates through their Americans for Prosperity PAC. David Koch also supported many philanthropic causes and declined to endorse President Trump. John Yang reports.

Duration:00:02:21

Mark Shields and Ramesh Ponnuru on Trump's trade war and Biden's lead

8/23/2019
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Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Ramesh Ponnuru of The National Review join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including President Trump's trade war with China and attacks on the Fed and how they're affecting the U.S. economy, three recent Democratic departures from the 2020 presidential race and the legacy of billionaire GOP donor David Koch.

Duration:00:11:38

A scientific approach to evaluating global anti-poverty programs

8/23/2019
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In Ethiopia, over a quarter of the population survives on less than two dollars a day. International organizations and foreign governments provide funds to address the rampant poverty in this country and others, but little data is available to assess the effectiveness of such programs. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one nonprofit's rigorous, research-driven approach to aid.

Duration:00:09:04

Jeff Daniels on getting in character to play Atticus Finch

8/23/2019
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Small-town Alabama lawyer Atticus Finch from Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" is one of the most recognizable characters in American literature. In the recent Broadway update of the classic American story, actor Jeff Daniels plays Finch. Jeffrey Brown talks to Daniels, who received a Tony nomination for the role, about how he got into character for it.

Duration:00:04:52

As 2020 Democratic field shrinks again, rumors of a new GOP challenger for Trump

8/22/2019
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Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has become the third 2020 Democrat to drop out of the race, announcing he will pursue a third term as governor instead. Sen. John Hickenlooper of Colorado, who also recently ended his presidential campaign, says he will run for the Senate. And there are rumors of a potential new primary challenger to President Trump on the Republican side. John Yang reports.

Duration:00:02:21

News Wrap: White House backs off plan to slash billions in foreign aid

8/22/2019
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In our Thursday news wrap, it is being widely reported that the White House has backed off a plan to slash more than $4 billion in foreign aid. The cuts would have included humanitarian relief, peacekeeping and global health initiatives. Also, government airstrikes in northern Syria targeted Turkish forces for the second time this week, raising the risk of open conflict between the two countries.

Duration:00:06:29

How current Japan-South Korea tensions reflect decades of resentment

8/22/2019
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Japan and South Korea, the two most important U.S. allies in northeast Asia, are engaged in an increasingly grave feud. Relations between the two countries took a confrontational turn earlier this summer when Japan announced it would limit exports to South Korea; now, South Korea says it's ending a critical intelligence-sharing deal. Judy Woodruff reports on the historically rocky relationship.

Duration:00:04:52

Why skyrocketing federal debt will mean the next recession is harder to overcome

8/22/2019
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The Congressional Budget Office says the U.S. deficit is reaching its highest levels since the end of World War II, when considered as a share of the total economy. In the next decade, it's projected to grow by $800 billion more than originally expected, due to spending, tax cuts and slower economic growth. Lisa Desjardins talks to Maya MacGuineas of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Duration:00:06:24

How limiting high-capacity magazines could reduce the carnage in mass shootings

8/22/2019
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The U.S. has repeatedly observed a grim cycle around gun violence: A mass shooting occurs, prompting calls for the government to step in, but momentum dissipates before any legislative action is taken. But what specific gun regulations might change the outcomes, if not the frequency, of mass shootings? William Brangham talks to David Chipman of Giffords about the danger of high-capacity magazines.

Duration:00:07:58

In Europe, business booms when cruise ships arrive -- but is it worth the bother?

8/22/2019
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Cruise liners offer scenic views you can't replicate from land, but they also cause downstream consequences. In Europe, some beautiful waterfront cities are joining forces to limit the impact of thousands of passengers being disgorged onto their picturesque streets. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports on new restrictions being imposed in Belgium, Croatia, Greece, Italy and elsewhere.

Duration:00:08:12

Before cotton, sugar established American reliance on slave labor

8/22/2019
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It has been 400 years since the first African slaves arrived in what is now the U.S. In observance, The New York Times' 1619 Project spotlights lesser-known parts of American history related to slavery. Harvard University's Khalil Gibran Muhammad has analyzed how American sugar production cemented slavery within the U.S. economy -- and how its legacy endures. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

Duration:00:07:45

A student with social anxiety on why a 1st impression isn't always enough

8/22/2019
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Going back to school can spark both excitement and stress, as students navigate social circles and workload. For 21-year-old college student Ben Rolnick, who suffers from severe social anxiety, meeting new people and facilitating conversation present a challenge -- but that doesn't mean he doesn't think they're worth it. Rolnick offers his brief but spectacular take on seeking acceptance.

Duration:00:03:01

What Trump is saying about gun control and American Jews

8/21/2019
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President Trump spoke extensively with reporters outside the White House Wednesday, answering questions on gun policy, Russia, the economy and even birthright citizenship. Yamiche Alcindor, who was there in person, joins William Brangham to discuss key takeaways, including Trump's alignment with the NRA on gun background checks and his criticism of American Jews who support Democrats.

Duration:00:05:01

News Wrap: China urges U.S. to make a deal to end trade war

8/21/2019
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In our news wrap Wednesday, China said its trade war with the U.S. is hurting both countries. A spokesman in Beijing also said that when it comes to international treaties, the U.S. "breaks promises" and "violates rules." Meanwhile, Hong Kong protesters staged a sit-in at the subway station where pro-democracy supporters were attacked last month, spraying fire extinguishers at approaching police.

Duration:00:04:04

What Trump's new immigration rules mean for the detention of migrant children

8/21/2019
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The Trump administration is proposing major changes to rules about how long migrant families can be held in government custody, arguing that the move will yield more humane conditions in detention facilities. But critics fear the regulations will have the opposite effect. William Brangham talks to Warren Binford of Willamette University College of Law, about why she is "horrified" at the proposal.

Duration:00:10:42

Fuming over Greenland rebuff, Trump cancels upcoming Denmark visit

8/21/2019
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President Trump has canceled a planned trip to Denmark because Danish leadership refused to discuss selling Greenland. In Denmark, Trump's decision was seen as "doubly offensive" considering he had reportedly pushed for a grand welcome from the longtime U.S. ally. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports on Copenhagen's reaction and why climate change is putting Greenland in the spotlight.

Duration:00:07:36

Why Native populations are attracting new attention in 2020 presidential race

8/21/2019
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Native Americans received more attention from presidential candidates this week than in previous years. Nine 2020 Democratic hopefuls attended a forum in Sioux City, Iowa, to discuss U.S. treaty obligations to Native people, the epidemic of violence against Native women, health care and more. Lisa Desjardins reports and talks to Mark Trahant, editor of Indian Country Today and the event moderator.

Duration:00:05:52