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The Case For Immigration

News & Politics Podcasts

“The Case For Immigration” podcast explores issues in American history, economics, political philosophy, and culture and argues that large-scale immigration benefits Americans across income levels and strengthens American culture. The podcast argues that cuts to current immigration levels would leave America weaker, smaller, less innovative, less optimistic, less religious, and less able to meet its fiscal obligations. The podcast is hosted by Nathan Brown, an immigration lawyer in Fresno, California.

“The Case For Immigration” podcast explores issues in American history, economics, political philosophy, and culture and argues that large-scale immigration benefits Americans across income levels and strengthens American culture. The podcast argues that cuts to current immigration levels would leave America weaker, smaller, less innovative, less optimistic, less religious, and less able to meet its fiscal obligations. The podcast is hosted by Nathan Brown, an immigration lawyer in Fresno, California.

Location:

United States

Description:

“The Case For Immigration” podcast explores issues in American history, economics, political philosophy, and culture and argues that large-scale immigration benefits Americans across income levels and strengthens American culture. The podcast argues that cuts to current immigration levels would leave America weaker, smaller, less innovative, less optimistic, less religious, and less able to meet its fiscal obligations. The podcast is hosted by Nathan Brown, an immigration lawyer in Fresno, California.

Language:

English


Episodes

Law and Order at the Border

1/27/2021
Jonathan Haggerty joins us to talk about the most effective ways for the U.S. to enforce its immigration laws. He explains how harsh immigration enforcement is less effective at catching dangerous criminals and contrasts the Trump Administration's approach with its predecessors. We then discuss the politics of immigration and the trajectory toward broader reforms in a Biden Administration.

Duration:00:58:14

Can Americanness Be Bigger Than Whiteness?

1/11/2021
We recently spoke with history professor Johann Neem about his recent article Unbecoming American, which was featured in the Hedgehog Review. Professor Neem describes his family's experience immigrating from India and argues that recent tropes attempting to reduce American identity to nothing more than whiteness make it harder for immigrants to make themselves at home in America.

Duration:00:33:31

U.S. immigration policy from one Venezuelan conservative economist's perspective

11/28/2020
In this episode, we chat with Daniel Di Martino, a politically conservative international student from Venezuela and Ph.D. candidate in economics at Columbia University. Daniel recounts his experience growing up in Venezuela and shares his perspective on the nation's ongoing economic and political turmoil. Daniel also assesses the U.S. immigration system from his perspective as an economist, conservative, and Venezuelan. He offers his thoughts on why conservatives should welcome migrants...

Duration:00:52:03

Coming Changes Under Joe Biden

11/16/2020
I recently spoke with immigration analyst Sam Peak about what changes to immigration may be coming under President Biden and changing attitudes among some on the Right toward immigration.

Duration:00:27:15

ICE Controversies in the Fourth Year of Trump's Presidency

10/19/2020
I recently spoke with Los Angeles Times reporter Andrea Castillo about an immigrant suicide at an ICE detention center, protesters getting pepper sprayed by guards at a detention center, and litigation by ICE against California over its attempt to ban private prisons.

Duration:00:38:52

Just A Little Tyranny

9/8/2020
I recently spoke with Shikha Dalmia, a senior policy analyst for the Reason Foundation, about the increasingly tyrannical anti-immigration practices of the Trump Administration, the harassment of students and doctors, ICE being used against US citizens, and nationalism abroad.

Duration:00:47:55

Immigrant New York

8/19/2020
I spoke with historian Tyler Anbinder about his book, City of Dreams: The 400 Year Epic History of Immigrant New York. In a wide-ranging conversation, we talked about Irish, German, Italian, and Jewish immigrants; riots, Abraham Lincoln, gangs, anarchists, the abolition of slavery, Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty, Martin Scorsese, and the American Dream.

Duration:00:50:06

The Surprising Origins of America's Most Notorious Anti-Immigration Law

6/29/2020
I recently spoke with author Daniel Okrent about his book, The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America.

Duration:00:24:07

Ilya Somin on Freedom of Movement

5/18/2020
We recently spoke with Ilya Somin, law professor at George Mason University, about his new book Free to Move: Foot Voting, Migration, and Political Freedom. His book is available on May 22, 2020 on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Free-Move-Migration-Political-Freedom/dp/0190054581

Duration:00:43:21

Was DACA Illegal? Was Trump's Rescission Illegal?

4/27/2020
Could DACA be a good policy, but also illegal at the same time? Should we care if a policy is unconstitutional when we like the policy? Ilya Shapiro explains why he supports DACA and relief for young people who were brought into the United States illegally, but thinks that the Obama administration lacked constitutional authority to implement it. I disagree, but Mr. Shapiro's position is intellectually honest and deserves attention. Ilya Shapiro is the director of the Robert A. Levy Center...

Duration:00:59:09

Government's Constitutional Hall Pass Against Immigrants

2/24/2020
I recently spoke with constitutional scholar, Ilya Somin, about how courts often allow the government to infringe immigrants’ basic rights (such as free speech, freedom of religion, and equal protection) in a way they would never allow against US citizens. Professor Somin warns that these abuses often end up affecting US citizens. He also explains how the legal theory allowing these double standards, "the plenary power doctrine," was invented nearly a century after the ratification of the...

Duration:00:51:24

Talking to Immigration Skeptics

2/10/2020
I recently spoke with Robert Haglund, a marketing expert, former intelligence analyst for the Air Force, and producer for conservative podcasts and talk shows. Robbie is also editor of this podcast. We talked about his experience training U.S. military personnel to negotiate with Iraqi tribal leaders, the challenges of cross-cultural dialogue, how cultural divisions in the United States affect the immigration debate, whether its worth while talking to immigration skeptics (yes), whether all...

Duration:01:15:47

Immigrants Sending "Our" Money Overseas?

2/3/2020
I recently had an entertaining and thought-provoking conversation with economist David Henderson about whether immigrants have the right to do what they want with the money they earn at work, the large sums of money immigrants in the United States send to their families in their home countries in the form of remittances, Trump's proposals to stop or tax these remittances, the effectiveness of these private remittances compared to government-to-government foreign aide, and the idea of selling...

Duration:00:44:51

9. Bryan Caplan on Open Borders

1/22/2020
In this episode, economist and New York Times best selling author Bryan Caplan argues that open borders would strengthen the American economy, reinforce the best aspects of our culture, and be consistent with our most common moral world views. His recent book, Open Borders: The Science and Ethics of Immigration, is available here: https://www.amazon.com/Open-Borders-Science-Ethics-Immigration/dp/1250316960

Duration:00:55:47

8. The War On The Irish Poor

10/7/2019
I recently spoke with Hidetaka Hirota, an historian of American immigration and deportation law, about the thousands of Irish immigrants deported and excluded from Massachusetts and New York in the first half of the 1800s, and how these two states' immigration bureaucracies served as models for future federal immigration agencies. Expelling the Poor Hidetaka Hirota

Duration:00:54:00

7. Immigration & the American Worker

8/16/2019
Labor economist Geovanni Peri explains how immigration affects American workers, whether it pushes American workers to acquire new skills and education, whether immigration creates winners and losers, how it affects federal and state budgets, how the influx of nearly 100,000 Cuban refugees in 1980 affected the Miami job market, and how the Arizona crackdown in the 2000s affected the job market and agricultural production there.

Duration:01:01:45

6. Deportation & 'Throwaway Culture'

7/23/2019
What is "throwaway culture"? Are we too comfortable treating resources, and even people, as disposable? How do we overcome the throwaway habit? I recently spoke with Charlie Camosy about how "throwaway culture" affects current American immigration policy and debate. He explains how throwaway culture has infected leaders and institutions on both the Left and Right. He is an associate professor of theological and social ethics at Fordham University and author of the recently published book,...

Duration:00:33:10

5. The Life-Boat is Not Full; Also It’s Not a Life-Boat

5/22/2019
I recently talked with philosophy professor Andrew Fiala about immigration and “Life-Boat Ethics”, whether the economy is a zero-sum game, the controversy over if and how much immigrants hurt low-income Americans, what’s wrong with the argument that we have too many immigrants, John Locke and whether we can morally justify interfering with an employer’s right to contract with an immigrant and denying the immigrant a better life, how immigration affects the environment, the American origins...

Duration:01:00:01

Asylum: Charity or Something More?

5/7/2019
I recently spoke with human rights legal scholar Silas Allard about asylum. Silas is the Managing Director of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University. He argues that we should stop thinking that it's merely an act of charity when the United States grants asylum to a person fleeing persecution. He argues that a person has not only a right, but a duty, to flee persecution. If we interfere with a person fulfilling this obligation without a valid reason, according to...

Duration:00:59:05

The Dream Act & Deferred Action, A Partial History

4/29/2019
I recently spoke with Don Riding, former local INS & USCIS field office director for Fresno, CA, about why the “Dream Act” failed, the history of “deferred action”, why he supports the Dream Act but not DACA, why deporting millions of immigrants already living here would be a nightmare, how Republicans and Democrats undermine practical compromises, the time John Lennon almost got deported, how in the past US citizen women lost their US citizenship upon marrying a foreigner, and many other...

Duration:00:51:35