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Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Public Radio

A live call-in program, engaging noted guests and listeners in a thought-provoking national conversation from a Native perspective. Hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta).

A live call-in program, engaging noted guests and listeners in a thought-provoking national conversation from a Native perspective. Hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta).

Location:

Anchorage, AK

Description:

A live call-in program, engaging noted guests and listeners in a thought-provoking national conversation from a Native perspective. Hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta).

Language:

English

Contact:

4401 Lomas Blvd NE Suite C Albuquerque, NM 87110 5059992444


Episodes

05-11-21 Returning to … normal?

5/11/2021
COVID-19 vaccinations are helping lower infection rates. Some tribes are having days with no new infections. Many cities are easing restrictions on public gatherings imposed more than a year ago. Offices, movie theaters and restaurants are all making attempts to bring people back together under one roof. But how close are we to living life like we did before the pandemic? We’ll ask experts about the likely scenarios for returning to work and life following a major public health threat.

Duration:00:56:29

05-10-21 To our mothers

5/10/2021
Our mothers are the backbones of Native families and communities. They have the drive to nurture and heal. This year’s Mother’s Day was a particularly sweet one as many families are able to gather again as the COVID-19 threat subsides. We’re honoring Native mothers and thanking them for all they do.

Duration:00:56:29

05-07-21 Sharing awareness through art and culture

5/7/2021
Red dresses hanging in forests and government meeting spaces; Red hand prints on people’s faces and shirts; photo portraits of grieving family members. They are among the artistic expressions that raise awareness of missing and murdered Native people to the general public. The issue is a touchstone for creative individuals. We’ll talk with artists about what draws them to the issue and what effect they hope to have.

Duration:00:56:29

05-06-21 The threat to Indigenous people in Canada and Mexico

5/6/2021
Indigenous people all over the world are disproportionately represented among those who are missing or murdered. Canada released a national inquiry into missing and murdered women and others in 2019, calling for major reforms among governments, businesses, advocacy organizations and social service providers. The country likely will not meet the deadline this June for an action plan, but lawmakers just allocated more than $2.2 billion to help Indigenous women. In Mexico, the murder of women...

Duration:00:56:29

05-05-21 Those left behind

5/5/2021
Each missing and murdered Indigenous person retains a connection to family members, loved ones, and friends. Their absence leaves an empty space in their communities and a lifetime of pain and trauma. Unanswered questions surrounding a missing person or unresolved crime just compound the misery. In this hour, family members of missing and murdered people remember their loved ones and discuss the legacy they are forced to carry.

Duration:00:56:29

05-04-21 Expanding the missing and murdered focus

5/4/2021
Many advocates focus on solving the problem of missing and murdered women and girls because they are vulnerable to the prevalent violence and neglect that contributes to the problem. But the missing and murdered efforts are expanding to include other groups. A 2016 study funded by the National Institute of Justice found significantly more Indigenous men are missing than women. Native gay and trans men and women are targets of persecution and exploitation, increasing their chances of falling...

Duration:00:56:29

05-03-21 How governments can help solve the missing and murdered crisis

5/3/2021
U.S. Department of Interior Secretary Debra Haaland created a new unit to seek justice for missing and murdered Indigenous people. The initiative includes the influx of $5 million to review unsolved cases and coordinate work among other agencies and organizations. Oklahoma just instituted a law that requires coordination among state and federal officials on cases involving missing and murdered Native people. These are among the efforts elected leaders have instituted to try and address the...

Duration:00:56:29

04-30-21 April in the news

4/30/2021
Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum sparked immediate backlash when he told a conservative youth gathering that European Christians built America from 'nothing,' and that there is little Native American culture in American culture. He's not the first, nor probably the last, to try to rewrite Native Americans out of history. Also, the fate of hundreds of millions of dollars in federal coronavirus relief money is now in the hands of the United States Supreme Court. The High Court heard arguments...

Duration:00:56:29

04-29-21 “Super Indian” returns

4/29/2021
Hubert Logan, Wampum Baggs, Blud Kwan’Tum and the other characters created by Arigon Starr (Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma) are coming back to life in an audio podcast. It’s full circle for the Super Indian cast that started as radio theater in 2006 distributed by Native Voice One. Starr then developed the idea into a graphic novel. Now the enterprising writer, artist and musician revives the Super Indian story with three installments of a streaming audio podcast. We’ll catch up with Starr as...

Duration:00:56:29

04-28-21 Book of the Month: “Copper Yearning” by Kimberly Blaeser

4/28/2021
White Earth Ojibwe poet Kimberly Blaeser is helping us celebrate National Poetry Month by sharing her book “Copper Yearning.” It’s full of poems that speak about Native people’s place in the world. That includes the connection to sacred places and lands and waterways that are challenged. Other poetic gems give the details of Native life center stage, down to the ribbon and jingles on a dancer’s dress. Join us for our April Book of the Month and our visit with Kimberly Blaeser.

Duration:00:56:29

04-27-21 Racing against the pandemic

4/27/2021
The pandemic is a serious threat to people of all Native nations. But it posed an added danger when Yuchi elder Maxine Wildcat Barnett got sick with COVID-19. She is the last fluent speaker of the Yuchi language. Fortunately she recovered. But it puts into perspective the importance of Native language revitalization programs. Some language instruction turned to online classes and social media to keep up momentum during the pandemic. The Cherokee Nation is among those that prioritized fluent...

Duration:00:56:29

04-26-21 Falling for ‘Rutherford Falls’

4/26/2021
A new comedy on NBC’s streaming service, Peacock TV, proves border towns can be funny. The setting is a town near the fictional Minishonka reservation. The two main characters, Nathan Rutherford, played by Ed Helms, and Regan Wells played by Jana Schmieding (Mniconjou and Sicangu Lakota) are best friends who are trying to get their communities excited about history and culture. Half of the writers are Native, as are the showrunner and main character. Sierra Teller Ornelas (Navajo) is the...

Duration:00:56:29

04-23-21 Cultural traditions of spear fishing

4/23/2021
Ojibwe fishermen launch their boats in shallow water in the Great Lakes at dusk. They shine flashlights into the water looking for the iridescent shimmer of walleye eyes. In an age-old tradition, they take their catch with a spear. The tradition and tribes’ right to spearfish is affirmed in past treaties and legal decisions. Still, Native fishers face occasional confrontations by uninformed non-Native fishermen. We’ll hear about the cultural significance of spearfishing as well as some...

Duration:00:56:29

04-22-21 Grieving ecological loss

4/22/2021
Native people are traditionally closely associated with the land. Ecological destruction and the loss of land from the effects of climate change can affect Native people’s sense of identity. A pair of researchers gathered stories from Inuit people who suffered grief for the loss of ice and animals they rely on. Tribes continue fights on many fronts to stop further loss of land important to them to mineral extraction, development or flawed government management. On Earth Day we’ll zero in on...

Duration:00:56:29

04-21-21 COVID-19 south of the border

4/21/2021
Mexico and some Central and South American countries are struggling with the COVID-19 pandemic much more than most of the rest of the world. Mexico’s Health Department estimates the death toll could be as high as 330,000 people in a country with a population a 126 million. Global health organizations blame the country’s lack of investment in testing, treatment and education when it comes to the virus. Making matters worse is a disjointed vaccination effort. Some Indigenous populations are...

Duration:00:56:29

04-20-21 Holding police accountable

4/20/2021
Just north of the courtroom where a police officer is on trial in the death of George Floyd, another officer shot and killed Daunte Wright, an unarmed black man. The Brooklyn Center Police Department acknowledges the shooting was accidental, and charged the officer with manslaughter. Such incidents are gaining higher scrutiny and continue to raise alarm among people of color. At least one analysis of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data finds Native Americans die at the hands of...

Duration:00:56:29

04-19-21 Will the Biden Administration act on DAPL?

4/19/2021
Tribal leaders and climate activists are at odds with the Biden Administration after a missed opportunity to shut off the flow of oil in the Dakota Access Pipeline. Since the end of the DAPL-supporting Trump Administration, opponents of the pipeline saw a recent federal court hearing as a key chance for Biden to set a new course for the future of the project. Instead, the U.S. Department of Justice neglected to weigh in one way or the other. Biden has already nixed the controversial Keystone...

Duration:00:56:29

04-16-21 Safety vs. learning as schools begin in-person classes

4/16/2021
More and more school districts across the country are reopening their doors to students as states start seeing improving COVID-19 infection numbers. Vaccinations help and tribes are among the leaders in vaccine distribution. But teachers, students and parents still remain cautious about the safety of their children and the family members they come in contact with. Many health officials warn of another surge in cases if schools and businesses reopen too soon.

Duration:00:56:29

04-15-21 Correcting the record with inclusion and accuracy

4/15/2021
There are plenty of warnings about the accuracy of information on publicly-edited online sources like Wikipedia, but those are one of the first places people go to research a topic. The National Museum of the American Indian is hosting a Wikipedia Edit-a-thon. They want to add entries to the public online encyclopedia, specifically on Native women. Organizers maintain entries are often inaccurate, one-sided or missing. We’ll talk about the state of accurate representation and inclusion in...

Duration:00:56:29

04-14-21 Music Maker: Joy Harjo

4/14/2021
With a mix of spoken word and jazzy soul sounds, Muscogee Creek Nation musician Joy Harjo might make listeners want to dance to her new album “I Pray for My Enemies”. But her creations are also meant to make people think and feel. Harjo, the nation’s first Native American Poet Laureate, features words in her Muscogee language layered with graceful jazz. And listeners are treated to her inviting saxophone sounds. Our April Music Maker is a celebration of the music and poetry of Joy Harjo.

Duration:00:56:29