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91.5 KRCC's Looking Up

Colorado Public Radio

Each week Hal Bidlack from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society alerts Southern Colorado listeners what to watch for in our night skies.

Each week Hal Bidlack from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society alerts Southern Colorado listeners what to watch for in our night skies.
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Location:

Colorado Springs, CO

Description:

Each week Hal Bidlack from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society alerts Southern Colorado listeners what to watch for in our night skies.

Language:

English


Episodes

Looking Up: So Close, So Far

11/12/2018
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This week on Looking Up Hal speaks of night sky wonders both near and far. There are lots and lots of amazing and wonderful things in the Colorado night sky. Some make you say “wow” because of how beautiful they are and others because of the wonder of what you are actually seeing. And if you are an early riser this Wednesday, November 14 th , you get to see something that is both – a pair of bright and beautiful objects very close to each other.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: Khan-Gratulations Are In Order...

11/5/2018
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To the star Menkar, which, as we learn on this week's episode of Looking Up, is well on its way to becoming a planetary nebula. With the end of daylight savings time, the nights come early to southern Colorado. And while that make it tough to get a round of golf in after work, it makes it easier to look up at the many cool things in the Colorado night sky. And one of the coolest, literally, is the very interesting star Menkar.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: Can You Hear Me Now?

10/29/2018
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This week on Looking Up Bruce Bookout inspires us with comet 'tales' from various cultures. Comets are very remarkable objects in the night sky. Most celestial bodies travel across the skies at regular, predictable intervals; comets' movements have always seemed very erratic and unpredictable. Ancient people in many cultures believed that the gods dictated their motions and were sending them as a message.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: From Dusk To Dawn

10/22/2018
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This week on Looking Up Hal gives us the low down on a planet that will be up all night long. Regular listeners of Looking Up will recall that I really like the planet Uranus. Uranus is cool in many ways – it’s the first planet discovered in modern times, as it is too dim for ancient folks to properly map it. It also is tipped way over on its axis, with a single year lasting 84 Earth years, Uranus has 42 years when only the northern hemisphere gets sunlight, followed by 42 years with only...

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: Asteroids, Moon Rocks, And Meteorites . . . Oh My!

10/15/2018
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This week Hal takes a "vested" interest in space rocks of all kinds. Have you ever touched a rock that was not of this Earth? If you visited the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC, you may well have stood in line to touch the moon rock they have on display in the great hall. But other than that, have you touched a moon rock? A rock from Mars? Or even an asteroid? Well, maybe.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: Hamal Is A Special Star, Just Like Every Star

10/8/2018
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This week on Looking Up Chloe Brooks-Kistler returns as guest host with some info on Hamal, a protoype orange giant star. Today’s edition of Looking Up is going to be, well, very average. And that’s because the subject of today’s episode is a very average star named Hamal. But in this case, being average is very, very helpful to astronomers. Let me tell you why.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: 'B' Is For Brightest

10/1/2018
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The alpha star is not always the brightest star in a constellation, as we learn on this week's Looking Up. I want to tell you about a very strange star known formally as Beta Ceti, and less formally as Diphda.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: We Love You Mr. Moonlight

9/24/2018
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It's known by many names but there's no mistaking being face to face with a full moon. Many early Native Americans tribes kept track of time by observing the seasons and lunar months, although there was much variability. Some tribes defined a year as 12 Moons, while others assigned it 13. Certain tribes that used a lunar calendar added an extra Moon every few years, to keep it in sync with the seasons. Colonial Americans adopted some of the Native American full Moon names and we maintain...

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: Tilt The Season

9/17/2018
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This week on Looking Up we learn the astronomical reason for the seasonal changes. I have breaking news from the world of astronomy. The Earth has seasons! Ok, so maybe you already knew that. But do you know why? Ok, you probably do. You know that the Earth is tilted off being straight up and down in space by about 23 ½ degrees. But do you know why? Well, it’s because, we think, not too long after the Earth was formed, it got smacked by a massive collision with a protoplanet perhaps the size...

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: Vanishing Point

9/10/2018
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Sometimes when a thing becomes hidden, something else is revealed. Hal reveals an upcoming occultation in this week's episode of Looking Up. One of the great things about astronomy is that there are so many different things you can look at. Some astronomers are fascinated with planets, while others study entire galaxies. And there are some dedicated amateur astronomers that are all about asteroids – those hunks of material left over from the formation of our solar system.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: C'mon Back Neptune

9/3/2018
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When a planet appears to reverse course and move 'backwards' in the night sky it's said to be in retrograde motion. You may have heard about Mercury doing that but other planets do, as well. This week on Looking Up we learn of Neptune's impending retro action. Lots of things are going retro – fashion, TV shows, and giant balls of gas. That last one refers to the giant gas planet Neptune, the most distant planet in the solar system.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: Here Comes The Sun...

8/27/2018
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This week on Looking Up Bruce Bookout illuminates us on the historic and cultural aspects of that special star nearest to us. The most obvious celestial object and most influential is the Sun. Every ancient culture around the world saw the Sun as some form of deity. There are over a hundred difference names of the Sun, as either a god or goddess, in the various cultures of the world. Consider how many song lyrics speak of the Sun.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: One More Time...

8/20/2018
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On this week's Looking Up Hal points out the meteoric rise of GZ (short for comet Giacobini-Zinner) a celestial visitor visible in the Colorado sky this month. Comets, you recall, are often called dirty snowballs in space. They are made up of the original materials from the formation of the solar system, and thus are some of the oldest things out there. Trillions of comets slowly circle the Sun way, way out there, many times farther than Pluto, in a cloud of comets known as the Oort Cloud....

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: A Big Baby Begs For Attention

8/13/2018
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When you're No. 2 you have to shine a little harder. This week on Looking Up we learn of the 2nd brightest, but much lesser known star in the constellation Aquila. If you’ve listened to Looking Up for the past three years or so, you may have noticed that sometimes I talk about really obvious things, like, say, the Moon or the Sun, or Jupiter or Saturn. And other times, I tell you about very obscure things that you likely have never heard of. I do the latter for two reasons. First, I think...

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: Cosmic Debris

8/6/2018
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The Perseid Meteor Shower is back and the 2018 edition could be a banner event as we learn on Looking Up this week.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: The God Of War Is Getting Rusty

7/30/2018
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This week Mars will be as big as the full moon (as long as it's viewed through a telescope at about 100x magnification). There’s a rusty planet up on the Southern Colorado sky right now that is definitely worth taking a look at, because you’ll won’t see it this well again until 2035. I’m talking about Mars, and as it turns out, the orbits of Mars and the Earth are such that right now, Mars is about as close as it ever gets to Earth. In more “normal” years, so to speak, Mars is still a pretty...

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: There May Be Snow On The Roof...

7/23/2018
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But there's still fire, or some mysterious heat source, deep in the belly of Pluto, as we learn on Looking Up this week. OK, I admit it, I’m a sucker for Pluto. The diminutive dwarf planet has always fascinated me, and I still clearly remember a few years ago when I was able to actually observe the tiny speck of light that is Pluto through my own telescope.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: 8 Days A Week Was Not Enough...

7/16/2018
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This week on Looking Up Bruce Bookout takes time to explain calender reformation. We again mark a calendar to help us break up our revolution around the sun into smaller more manageable portions. Calendars are funny things in that keeping them and naming their parts lends to strange things.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: A Spot That's Hard To Spot

7/9/2018
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It's a good week to try and find the closest planet to our sun. Often times, the brightest objects in the sky are our fellow planets. Jupiter, Saturn, and especially Venus blaze in the night sky. But the most elusive of all the planets to see might well be one that isn't farthest from the Sun, but rather is closest, the remarkable planet Mercury.

Duration:00:01:29

Looking Up: At The Shadow The Time Will Be...

6/25/2018
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This week on Looking Up Bruce Bookout sheds some light and some shadow on the origins of the sundial. As we have discussed before, timekeeping is an essential part of Astronomy. The ancients relied on very low tech for many methods to tell time. One effective method divides the day into relevant parts. Let’s shine a little light on the Sundial.

Duration:00:01:29