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Steve Hsu is a Professor of Theoretical Physics and Computational Mathematics, Science, and Engineering at Michigan State University. Join him for wide-ranging conversations with leading writers, scientists, technologists, academics, entrepreneurs, investors, and more.

Steve Hsu is a Professor of Theoretical Physics and Computational Mathematics, Science, and Engineering at Michigan State University. Join him for wide-ranging conversations with leading writers, scientists, technologists, academics, entrepreneurs, investors, and more.

Location:

United States

Description:

Steve Hsu is a Professor of Theoretical Physics and Computational Mathematics, Science, and Engineering at Michigan State University. Join him for wide-ranging conversations with leading writers, scientists, technologists, academics, entrepreneurs, investors, and more.

Language:

English


Episodes

Theodore A. Postol: Nuclear Weapons, Missile Technology, and U.S. Diplomacy — #12

5/19/2022
Theodore A. Postol is professor emeritus of Science, Technology, and International Security at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is widely known as an expert on nuclear weapons and missile technology. Educated in physics and nuclear engineering at MIT, he was a researcher at Argonne National Lab, worked at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, and was scientific advisor to the Chief of Naval Operations. After leaving the Pentagon, Postol helped to build a program...

Duration:01:55:48

Raghuveer Parthasarathy: The Four Physical Principles — #11

5/5/2022
Raghu Parthasarathy is the Alec and Kay Keith Professor of Physics at the University of Oregon. His research focuses on biophysics, exploring systems in which the complex interactions between individual components, such as biomolecules or cells, can give rise to simple and robust physical patterns. Raghu is the author of a recent popular science book: So Simple a Beginning: How Four Physical Principles Shape Our Living World. Steve and Raghu discuss: 1:34 - Early life, transition from...

Duration:01:20:52

Carl Zha: Xinjiang, Ukraine, and U.S.-China relations — #10

4/21/2022
Carl Zha is the host of the Silk and Steel podcast, which focuses on China, history, culture, and politics. He is a former engineer now based in Bali, Indonesia. Find Carl on Twitter @CarlZha. Steve and Carl discuss: 1. Carl’s background: Chongqing to Chicago, Caltech to Bali, Life as a digital nomad 2. Xinjiang (35:20) 3. Ukraine (1:03:51) 4. China-Russia relationship (1:16:01) 5. U.S.-China competition (1:49:26) Music used with permission from Blade Runner Blues Livestream...

Duration:02:09:10

Scott Aaronson: Quantum Computing, Unsolvable Problems, & Artificial Intelligence — #9

4/7/2022
Scott Aaronson is the David J. Bruton Centennial Professor of Computer Science at The University of Texas at Austin, and director of its Quantum Information Center. Previously, he taught for nine years in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. His research interests center around the capabilities and limits of quantum computers, and computational complexity theory more generally. Scott also writes the blog Shtetl Optimized: https://scottaaronson.blog/ Steve and Scott...

Duration:01:20:43

Sebastian Mallaby: Venture capital as an engine of courage — #8

3/24/2022
Sebastian Mallaby is a writer and journalist whose work covers financial markets, international relations, innovation, and technology. He is the author of "The Power Law: Venture Capital and the Making of the New Future." Steve and Sebastian discuss venture capital, tech startups, business model and technology innovation, global adoption of the Silicon Valley model, and the future of...

Duration:01:16:11

Vlatko Vedral: Oxford Theoretical Physicist on Quantum Superposition of Living Creatures — #7

3/10/2022
Vlatko Vedral is Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Oxford and Centre for Quantum Technologies (CQT) at the National University of Singapore. He is known for his research on the theory of Entanglement and Quantum Information Theory. Steve and Vlatko discuss: Resources Web page: https://www.vlatkovedral.com/ Entanglement Between Superconducting Qubits and a Tardigrade https://arxiv.org/pdf/2112.07978.pdf Macroscopic Superposition States: entanglement of a...

Duration:01:14:40

Richard Sander: Affirmative Action, Mismatch Theory, & Academic Freedom — #6

3/3/2022
Richard Sander is Jesse Dukeminier Professor at UCLA Law School. AB Harvard, JD, PhD (Economics) Northwestern. Sander has studied the structure and effects of law school admissions policies. He coined the term "Mismatch" to describe negative consequences resulting from large admissions preferences. Topics discussed: 1. Early life: educational background and experience with race and politics in America. 2. Mismatch Theory: basic observation and empirical evidence; Law schools and...

Duration:01:26:17

Shai Carmi: Polygenic risk scores & embryo screening — #5

2/24/2022
Shai Carmi is Professor of Statistical and Medical Genetics at Hebrew University (Jerusalem). https://scarmilab.org/https://twitter.com/ShaiCarmi Topics and links: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.11.05.370478v3https://twitter.com/ShaiCarmi/status/1487694576458481664https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.aau4832 Music used with permission from Blade Runner Blues Livestream improvisation by State Azure. -- Steve Hsu is Professor of Theoretical Physics and of...

Duration:01:15:08

Jon Y (Asianometry) on Semiconductor Tech and U.S.-China Competition — #4

2/17/2022
Jon Y produces Asianometry, which focuses on Asia technology, finance, and history: Podcast, YouTube channel, and Substack. Steve and Jon discuss the global semiconductor industry with an emphasis on U.S.-China technology competition. Topics discussed: Music used with permission from Blade Runner Blues Livestream improvisation by State Azure. -- Steve Hsu is Professor of Theoretical Physics and of Computational Mathematics, Science, and Engineering at Michigan State University....

Duration:01:34:01

Richard Hanania: Wokeness, Public Choice Theory, & Geostrategy — #3

2/10/2022
Richard Hanania is President of the Center for the Study of Partisanship and Ideology (CSPI). He is a former Research Fellow at the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University. His interests include personality differences between conservatives and liberals, morality in international politics, machine learning algorithms for text analysis, and American foreign policy. In addition to his academic work, he has written in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and...

Duration:01:20:17

Steve Hsu Q&A: Complex trait prediction in Genomics, and Genomic Prediction / Embryo Selection

2/3/2022
Steve answers questions about recent progress in AI/ML prediction of complex traits from DNA and applications in embryo selection. Highlights: Some relevant scientific papers: https://infoproc.blogspot.com/2022/01/preimplantation-genetic-testing-for.htmlhttps://arxiv.org/abs/2101.05870https://www.genetics.org/content/210/2/477https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-51258-xhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-68881-8https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-69927-7Music used with...

Duration:01:09:55

James Lee on Polygenic Prediction and Embryo Selection — #1

1/24/2022
James Lee is a professor of psychology at the University of Minnesota. He is a leading researcher working in behavior genetics and statistical genetics. In this episode, he discusses recent progress in the genomic prediction of complex traits such as cognitive ability and educational attainment. Lee also discusses his recent Wall Street Journal editorial on embryo selection, Imagine a Future Without Sex. Resources Imagine a Future Without Sex: Reproductive technology may lead us to realize...

Duration:01:04:23

Warren Hatch on Seeing the Future in the Era of COVID-19 – #50

6/11/2020
Steve and Corey talk to Warren Hatch, President and CEO of Good Judgment Inc. Warren explains what makes someone a good forecaster and how the ability to integrate and assess information allows cognitively diverse teams to outperform prediction markets. The hosts express skepticism about whether the incentives at work in large organizations would encourage the adoption of approaches that might lead to better forecasts. Warren describes the increasing depth of human-computer collaboration in...

Duration:01:16:12

Leif Wenar on the Resource Curse and Impact Philosophy – #49

6/4/2020
Corey and Steve interview Leif Wenar, Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University and author of Blood Oil. They begin with memories of Leif and Corey’s mutual friend David Foster Wallace and end with a discussion of John Rawls and Robert Nozick (Wenar's thesis advisor at Harvard, and a friend of Steve's). Corey asks whether Leif shares his view that analytic philosophy had become too divorced from wider intellectual life. Leif explains his effort to re-engage philosophy in the big...

Duration:01:29:23

Leif Wenar on the Resource Curse and Impact Philosophy – #49

6/4/2020
Corey and Steve interview Leif Wenar, Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University and author of Blood Oil. They begin with memories of Leif and Corey’s mutual friend David Foster Wallace and end with a discussion of John Rawls and Robert Nozick (Wenar’s thesis advisor at Harvard, and a friend of Steve’s). Corey asks whether Leif shares his view that analytic philosophy had become too divorced from wider intellectual life. Leif explains his effort to re-engage philosophy in the big issues...

Duration:01:29:35

Michael Kauffman on Cancer, Drug Development and Market Capitalism – #48

5/28/2020
Steve and Corey speak with Dr. Michael Kauffman, co-founder and CEO of Karyopharm Therapeutics, about cancer and biotech innovation. Michael explains how he and Dr. Sharon Schacham tested her idea regarding nuclear-transport using simulation software on a home laptop, and went on to beat 1000:1 odds to create a billion dollar company. They discuss the relationship between high proprietary drug costs and economic incentives for drug discovery. They also discuss the unique US biotech...

Duration:01:23:21

Michael Kauffman on Cancer, Drug Development and Market Capitalism – #48

5/28/2020
Steve and Corey speak with Dr. Michael Kauffman, co-founder and CEO of Karyopharm Therapeutics, about cancer and biotech innovation. Michael explains how he and Dr. Sharon Schacham tested her idea regarding nuclear-transport using simulation software on a home laptop, and went on to beat 1000:1 odds to create a billion dollar company. They discuss the relationship between high proprietary drug costs and economic incentives for drug discovery. They also discuss the unique US biotech...

Duration:01:23:33

Scott Adams on Trump, and his book Loserthink – #47

5/21/2020
Corey and Steve talk to Scott Adams, creator of Dilbert and author of Loserthink. Steve reviews some of Scott's predictions, including of Trump’s 2016 victory. Scott (who once semi-humorously described himself as “left of Bernie”) describes what he describes as Trump's unique "skill stack". Scott highlights Trump's grasp of the role of psychology in economics, and maintains that honesty requires admitting that we do not know whether many of Trump’s policies are good or bad. Scott explains...

Duration:01:17:47

Scott Adams on Trump, and his book Loserthink – #47

5/21/2020
Corey and Steve talk to Scott Adams, creator of Dilbert and author of Loserthink. Steve reviews some of Scott’s predictions, including of Trump’s 2016 victory. Scott (who once semi-humorously described himself as “left of Bernie”) describes what he describes as Trump’s unique “skill stack”. Scott highlights Trump’s grasp of the role of psychology in economics, and maintains that honesty requires admitting that we do not know whether many of Trump’s policies are good or bad. Scott explains...

Duration:01:17:57

James Oakes on What’s Wrong with The 1619 Project – #46

5/14/2020
Steve and Corey talk to James Oakes, Distinguished Professor of History and Graduate School Humanities Professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, about "The 1619 Project" developed by The New York Times Magazine. The project argues that slavery was the defining event of US history. Jim argues that slavery was actually the least exceptional feature of the US and that what makes the US exceptional is that it is where abolition first begins. Steve wonders about the...

Duration:01:20:39