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Parsing Science: The stories behind scientific discoveries, as told by the researchers.

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United States

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English

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Episodes

A Sniff Test of Stress – Jonathan Williams

1/22/2019
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Might the chemicals we exhale while watching movies tell us about the emotional stress that we're experiencing? In episode 41, Jonathan Williams from the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany discusses his research analyzing the gasses emitted in cinemas, as described in his article "Proof of concept study: Testing human volatile organic compounds as tools for age classification of films," published on October 11, 2018 in the journal PLOS One.

Duration:00:29:53

Cognitive Biases on the Supreme Court – Jonathan Feingold & Evelyn Carter

1/9/2019
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Can cognitive biases and heuristics regarding race influence U.S. Supreme Court decisions? In episode 40, Jonathan Feingold and Evelyn Carter from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) discuss the sometimes selective use of social science research by U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist as analyzed in their article "Eyes Wide Open: What Social Science Can Tell Us About the Supreme Court's Use of Social Science" published on August 8, 2018 in the Northwestern...

Duration:00:31:05

Archaeology of the Recent Past (Part 2 of 2) – P.J. Capelotti

12/25/2018
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While we often associate archaeology with the study of cultures whose eras have long-since come and gone, artifacts from the recent past can tell us about culture as well. Part one of our conversation with P.J. Capelotti from Penn State University Abington concerned terrestrial archaeology. In part two, we talk about his explorations of aeronautical and aerospace archaeology, as chronicled in his recent book Adventures in Archaeology: The Wreck of the Orca II and other Explorations published...

Duration:00:25:31

Archaeology of the Recent Past (Part 1 of 2) – P.J. Capelotti

12/11/2018
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Ordinary objects from the recent past often hold secrets about our cultural history. In episode 38, P.J. Capelotti from Penn State University Abington talks with us about the history, archaeology, and anthropology of exploration as he writes about it in his recent book Adventures in Archaeology: The Wreck of the Orca II and other Explorations published on September 14, 2018 by the University Press of Florida. In part two of our conversation, we discuss the archaeology of human's expansion...

Duration:00:24:34

Illusions in the Periphery – Ben Balas

11/27/2018
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What can the chance discovery of an illusion tell us about how our eyes and brains work together? Ben Balas from North Dakota State University talks with us in episode 37 about his research into the Flashed Face Distortion Effect, an illusion in which normal faces – when rapidly presented in people’s peripheral vision – are perceived as grotesque and distorted. His article, "Factors that do and don’t affect the strength of the Flashed Face Distortion Effect”, written with Hannah Pearson, was...

Duration:00:29:08

Plasticity & Face Recognition – Marlene Behrmann

11/13/2018
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While we can't regenerate limbs, might our brains have greater plasticity than commonly thought? In episode 36, Marlene Behrmann from Carnegie Mellon University, discusses her 3-year longitudinal investigation of a young boy who had the region of his brain which recognizes faces removed, but regained this ability through neural plasticity. Her article "Successful Reorganization of Category-Selective Visual Cortex following Occipito-temporal Lobectomy in Childhood" was published with multiple...

Duration:00:32:19

Playing with Science History – Jean-François Gauvin

10/30/2018
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Almost lost to history, these toys quite literally put quantum mechanics at one’s fingertips. In episode 35, Jean-François Gauvin from Université Laval in Canada, discusses how he came to understand the purpose and value of unique toy blocks that ended up on his desk at Harvard University in 2014 as the director of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments (CHSI).

Duration:00:32:23

Decoding Cancers’ Expression – Mike Feigin

10/16/2018
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Because 98% of the human genome doesn't serve a direct role in gene expression, many biologists have long thought of them as nothing but "junk DNA." But might they hold the key to helping stem the formation of deadly cancers? In episode 34, Mike Feigin from Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center talks with us about his discovery of mutations in part of the human genome that most people have so far tended to ignore, but which appears to regulate the expression of genes which drive the...

Duration:00:28:15

Halting Cancers’ Spread – John Lewis

10/2/2018
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Can we put the brakes on cancers' ability to metastasize? In episode 33, John Lewis from the University of Alberta talks with us about his research into inhibiting cancer cell movement and metastasis through genomic targets.

Duration:00:32:37

Speech-to-Song Illusion – Mike Vitevitch

9/18/2018
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Can auditory errors and illusions better help us understand how the brain works? In episode 32 Mike Vitevitch from the University of Kansas talks with us about his research into the cognitive mechanisms underlying the Speech-to-Song auditory illusion.

Duration:00:30:13

Nothing to a Bee – Adrian Dyer

9/4/2018
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While various vertebrates have been taught to learn humans' concept of "zero," might too honey bees, even though their brains have thousands of times fewer neurons? In episode 31 Adrian Dyer from RMIT and Monash University in Australia talks with us about his work first teaching bees to count and then extrapolate what they've learned to infer zero.

Duration:00:30:03

Hearing Loss and Cognition – Yune Lee

8/21/2018
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Might early hearing impairment lead to cognitive challenges later in life? Yune Lee from the Ohio State University talks with us about his research into how even minor hearing loss can increase the cognitive load required to distinguish spoken language.

Duration:00:26:24

Differing Interpretations of Difficulty – Neil Lewis, Jr.

8/7/2018
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"No matter whether you think you can or can't," the saying goes, "you're right." Neil Lewis, Jr. from Cornell University talks with us about about his research into what differentiates students who experience difficulty in college as signaling its importance from those that make it mean that completing college is impossible. His article “No pain no gain? Social demographic correlates and identity consequences of interpreting experienced difficulty as importance” was published with Cristina...

Duration:00:23:55

Debunking Pterosaurs Flight – Armita Manafzadeh

7/24/2018
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Righting a 200 year old mistake: Armita Manafzadeh from Brown University talks with us about how her simulations of pterosaurs' range-of-motion demonstrate that the ancient reptiles almost certainly couldn't have flown like most paleontologists have long thought. Her article, "ROM mapping of ligamentous constraints on avian hip mobility: implications for extinct ornithodirans" was published on May 23, 2018 with Kevin Padian in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B - Biological Science.

Duration:00:34:23

Prehistoric Origins of Birds – Bhart-Anjan Bhullar

7/10/2018
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Bhart-Anjan Bhullar from Yale University talks with us about how the discovery of a 95 million year old Ichthyornis fossil in 2014 revealed some unexpected insights into the minds, and mouths, of toady's birds. Subscribe: iTunes | Google Podcast | Google Play | RSS

Duration:00:33:29

Retaining LGBQ Undergraduates in STEM – Bryce Hughes

7/5/2018
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In celebration of LGBTSTEMDay, talk with Bryce Hughes of Montana State University about his research into the factors that influence the retention of LGBT students in STEM programs. For more information, including materials discussed during this episode, visit ParsingScience.org. Subscribe: iTunes | Google Podcast | Google Play | RSS

Duration:00:29:19

Airing July 5th: Retaining LGBQ Undergrads in STEM with Bryce Hughes

6/26/2018
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Sneak peek of special LGBTSTEMDay episode, which airs July 5. Bryce Hughes will discuss with us his research into the retention of LGBT undergraduates in STEM. Bryce's full paper, "Coming out in STEM: Factors affecting retention of sexual minority STEM students," was published in Science Advances on March 14, 2018.

Duration:00:01:27

Multiple Work Identities – Brianna Caza, Sherry Moss & Heather Vough

6/11/2018
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Brianna Caza, Sherry Moss & Heather Vough talk with us about their research into how people who hold down multiple careers at the same time can struggle to find their authentic identities in their work. For more information, including materials discussed during this episode, visit ParsingScience.org. Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS.

Duration:00:25:08

Structural Racism & Police Shootings – Anita Knopov

5/29/2018
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Anita Knopov from Boston University talks with us about her research into how state-level implicit bias relates to the disparity in police shootings of unarmed Black Americans. For more information, including materials discussed during this episode, visit ParsingScience.org. Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS.

Duration:00:27:12

Uncovering Uncertain Identities – David Kernot

5/15/2018
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We thought this study was ultimately about William Shakespeare, but discovered it's implications are much broader. David Kernot from Australia’s Defence Science and Technology Group, currently studying at the Australian National University, talks with us about the many applications of his research into training algorithms to uncover authors' identities and personalities from their written words. For more information, including materials discussed during this episode, visit...

Duration:00:31:47