Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves.-logo

Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves.

Science Podcasts

On Parsing Science researchers share the unpublished stories behind their recent research and share the background that led to their scientific discoveries. In the show we explore what doesn’t makes it into scientific journals — taking listeners behind the scenes of world’s most compelling science.

On Parsing Science researchers share the unpublished stories behind their recent research and share the background that led to their scientific discoveries. In the show we explore what doesn’t makes it into scientific journals — taking listeners behind the scenes of world’s most compelling science.

Location:

United States

Description:

On Parsing Science researchers share the unpublished stories behind their recent research and share the background that led to their scientific discoveries. In the show we explore what doesn’t makes it into scientific journals — taking listeners behind the scenes of world’s most compelling science.

Language:

English

Contact:

202-210-0421


Episodes

Hot Girl Summer – Kyesha Jennings

10/13/2020
How are Black women using social media to develop community and identity? In episode 85 we talk with Kyesha Jennings from North Carolina State University about her analysis of what the wildly popular meme "hot girl summer" - drawn from lyrics by hip-hop phenomenon, Megan Thee Stallion - tells us about changes in the ways in which Black women cultivate community in digital spaces.

Duration:00:26:45

Why Narcissists Are “Never Wrong” – Tori Howes and Ed Kausel

9/29/2020
Should I have done something different? Or could nobody have seen it coming? In episode 84 Tori Howes and Ed Kausel join us to discuss their research into the malleability of narcissists' memory, as well as whether they're able to reflect on their mistakes to learn from them.

Duration:00:30:10

Adhering to Prohibitive Taboos – Manvir Singh

9/15/2020
Why do religious leaders abstain from some pleasures? In episode 83, Manvir Singh discusses his research into why shaman healers among the a group of people off the coast of Indonesia observe costly prohibitions, such abstinence or food restrictions, especially given that they could exploit their position for self-serving ends instead.

Duration:00:29:36

Moderating Spanking’s Lasting Impacts – Nicole Barbaro

9/1/2020
Does spanking really mess up kids' lives? In episode 82, Nicole Barbaro from Western Governors University Labs talks with us about her research into the factors that determine the answer to this question.

Duration:00:32:47

Picking Apart Conspiracy Theories – Tim Tangherlini

8/18/2020
Tim Tangherlini discusses his research into how conspiracy theorists interpret and use what they believe is “hidden knowledge” to connect multiple human interactions that are otherwise unlinked ... and how when one of these links is cut, they're less able to hold together a coherent story about it.

Duration:00:32:30

The Metaethics of Moral Claims – Jordan Theriault

8/4/2020
How do our brains respond when people behave in unpredictable ways? In episode 80, Jordan Theriault from Northeastern University discusses his research into a set of brain regions which, when activated by a variety of social tasks, can provide insights into how we judge the moral objectivity or subjectivity of others' unexpected claims.

Duration:00:32:39

A Marijuana Breathalyzer – Neil Garg

7/21/2020
What's that on your breath? In episode 79 of Parsing Science we talk with Neil Garg from UCLA about his research into the fundamental chemistry necessary for the creation of a small, electronic test of marijuana that works by way of a simple electrochemical oxidation process similar to that used in an alcohol breath test.

Duration:00:27:56

Mosquito-inspired Biotechnology – Richard Bomphrey

7/7/2020
What if mosquitos weren't just annoying bugs, but instead were bio-inspiring features? In episode 78, we talk with Richard Bomphrey from the University of London’s Royal Veterinary College about how mosquitoes can detect surfaces using the airflow caused by the movement of their own wings … and the autonomous drones he developed to mimic them.

Duration:00:31:38

How Black Politicians Matter – Trevon Logan

6/23/2020
What impact did Black politicians have during the Reconstruction? In episode 77, Trevon Logan from The Ohio State University's Department of Economics discusses his research into the election of Black politicians after the Civil War ended in 1865, which led to increased tax revenues that were put toward public schools and land ownership reform. White Southerners, however, reversed that progress just 12 years later, augmenting the systematic disenfranchisement of African Americans that...

Duration:00:33:05

When Ignorance is Bliss – Emily Ho

6/9/2020
Why do some of us choose to remain ignorant of information that - though perhaps unpleasant - could help us make better informed decisions in the future? In episode 76, Emily Ho from Northwestern University’s Department of Medical Social Sciences discusses her research into why we keep our heads in the sand about important information for a variety of psychological and economic reasons.

Duration:00:29:06

Birds’ Evolution Across Mass Extinctions – Daniel Field

5/26/2020
In episode 75, Daniel Field from the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Cambridge discusses his research into a 66.7-million-year-old bird fossil which mashes up features from chickens, turkeys, and ducks, providing the best evidence so far for understanding when groups of modern birds first evolved and began to diverge.

Duration:00:29:29

Parroting Probabilities – Amalia Bastos

5/12/2020
Very few animals can combine information to adjust their predictions in a flexible way by using domain-general intelligence as humans do. In episode 74, Amalia Bastos from the University of Auckland discusses her research demonstrating that kea parrots can make predictions based in probabilities, and adjust those predictions based on physical and social information.

Duration:00:28:18

Anything but Pedestrian – Courtney Coughenour & Jennifer Pharr

4/29/2020
Are drivers of more expensive cars really the jerks we make them out to be? In Episode 73, Courtney Coughenour and Jennifer Pharr from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas discuss their research into what differentiates drivers who are likely to yield for pedestrians in crosswalks from those who don't.

Duration:00:26:34

The Plight of the Tiger – Akchousanh Rasphone

4/14/2020
Are wild tigers now extinct in Laos? In episode 72, Akchousanh "Akchou" Rasphone from Oxford's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit discusses her research which concludes that improvised snares appear to have decimated the country's wild tiger population, a species whose worldwide population is now estimated to be around 200.

Duration:00:30:47

Why We Love & Exploit Animals – Verónica Sevillano

3/31/2020
Why is it that we treat various species of animals so differently? In episode 71, Verónica Sevillano with the Autonomous University of Madrid's Department of Social Psychology and Methodology discusses her research applying social psychology and conservation biology to understand the relationships people have with animals.

Duration:00:27:51

The Minds of Single-celled Organisms – Jeremy Gunawardena

3/17/2020
Can even a single-celled organism truly learn? In Episode 70, Jeremy Gunawardena with the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School talks with us about his replication of an experiment originally conducted over a century ago, which suggested that at least one single-cell organism - the trumpet-shaped Stentor roeseli - is able to carry out surprisingly complex decision-making behaviors

Duration:00:29:34

Cuttlefish in 3D Glasses – Trevor Wardill

3/3/2020
Why Velcro 3D glasses onto cuttlefish? In Episode 69, Trevor Wardill from the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior at the University of Minnesota discusses his research into the previously unknown ability of the cephalopod to see in stereo vision.

Duration:00:26:17

Undergraduates Formerly in Foster Care – Royel Johnson

2/18/2020
What factors best predict success at college among youth formerly in foster care? Royel Johnson discusses his systematic literature review of research on the college success of this historically underserved population.

Duration:00:27:14

Ivory Towers and Abattoirs – Temple Grandin

2/4/2020
How can research improve the lives of livestock, even as they're on their way to slaughter? In episode 67, Temple Grandin from the Colorado State University's College of Agricultural Sciences talks with us about her work on promoting improved communications between academic researchers and those in the animal agriculture industry.

Duration:00:21:53

Hiding in Plain Sight – Katherine Wood

1/22/2020
Did you catch that? In episode 66, Katherine Wood from the University of Illinois discusses her research with the scientist behind the famous “Invisible Gorilla” experiments, Daniel Simons, into if and when people notice unexpected objects in inattentional blindness tasks

Duration:00:33:15