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Science Underground

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Science Underground is a two-minute podcast hosted by TED speaker and scientist Ainissa Ramirez. By the time you sip your coffee or eat your cereal, Science Underground explains a science topic in a fun and understandable way. The show explores a range of topics—some that are pulled right from the headlines, others are topics you’ve been wanting to know. Ainissa interviews tops scientists and translates their work in everyday language--arming you with science nuggets for the next lunch table chat, water cooler klatch, or cocktail party. Each week there is a separate topic that can be listened to before class or when you have a brief moment to spare. The ideas will give you much to think about long after the podcast is over. New episodes are released on Sunday mornings. (Many topics align with NGSS.)

Science Underground is a two-minute podcast hosted by TED speaker and scientist Ainissa Ramirez. By the time you sip your coffee or eat your cereal, Science Underground explains a science topic in a fun and understandable way. The show explores a range of topics—some that are pulled right from the headlines, others are topics you’ve been wanting to know. Ainissa interviews tops scientists and translates their work in everyday language--arming you with science nuggets for the next lunch table chat, water cooler klatch, or cocktail party. Each week there is a separate topic that can be listened to before class or when you have a brief moment to spare. The ideas will give you much to think about long after the podcast is over. New episodes are released on Sunday mornings. (Many topics align with NGSS.)
More Information

Location:

United States

Description:

Science Underground is a two-minute podcast hosted by TED speaker and scientist Ainissa Ramirez. By the time you sip your coffee or eat your cereal, Science Underground explains a science topic in a fun and understandable way. The show explores a range of topics—some that are pulled right from the headlines, others are topics you’ve been wanting to know. Ainissa interviews tops scientists and translates their work in everyday language--arming you with science nuggets for the next lunch table chat, water cooler klatch, or cocktail party. Each week there is a separate topic that can be listened to before class or when you have a brief moment to spare. The ideas will give you much to think about long after the podcast is over. New episodes are released on Sunday mornings. (Many topics align with NGSS.)

Language:

English


Episodes

The Science of Fireworks

7/1/2016
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Fireworks are a display of color and chemistry. Everyone loves fireworks, especially astronomers. Find out why.

Duration:00:01:59

How Fireflies Make New Medicines

6/26/2016
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Fireflies light up the summertime night, but the glowing molecules inside them are also used by scientists to make new drugs.

Duration:00:02:01

Can We Make A Transporter?

6/19/2016
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Lots of technologies on Star Trek have become a reality. But what is missing is the transporter. Lawrence Krauss, physicist and author, sheds some light on the possibilities.

Duration:00:02:01

Making Ketchup Hurry Up

6/12/2016
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Ketchup takes a long time to come out of the bottle. Fortunately, science has a few answers for how to help ketchup hurry up.

Duration:00:01:59

ZOMBEES

6/5/2016
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Honeybees are turning into zombie bees after a small fly injects a parasite into them. Scientists are asking everyone to report weird bees at zombeewatch.org.

Duration:00:01:59

How Animals Camouflage

5/29/2016
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Get ready to be introduced to nature's best master of disguise--the cuttlefish.

Duration:00:02:00

Smart Shirts

5/22/2016
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In the future, you will be able to download data from your shirt, which has electronics embedded in the fabric.

Duration:00:02:00

How Lightning Makes Magnets

5/15/2016
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When lightning bolts zap iron minerals they make magnets called lodestones. NASA scientists coax bolts to strike rocks using a trick from Ben Franklin.

Duration:00:01:59

Say Cheese, Pandemic

5/8/2016
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There are special cameras, called thermal cameras, that can detect heat. These cameras are the first defense against threats and diseases.

Duration:00:02:00

Saving Monarch Butterflies

5/1/2016
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Twenty years ago, there were a billion monarch butterflies. Now, there are less than 10 percent of them left. Their disappearance is linked to a weed.

Duration:00:01:59

Meat Grown in a Lab

4/24/2016
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Scientists can now grow beef outside of the cow. In the not-so-distant future, you might get your burger from a beaker.

Duration:00:02:01

How Animals Gossip

4/17/2016
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Imagine if we could talk to the animals. To do so, we will have to think about time differently.

Duration:00:02:01

How Plants Know Which Way Is Up

4/10/2016
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Seeds that are buried deep in the soil need to figure out which way their roots and stem should go. Ends up they have special cells to tell them what's up.

Duration:00:02:01

Bubbles that Print

4/3/2016
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Deep in your ink jet printer are millions of explosions, which cause bubbles that help you print.

Duration:00:02:01

Space Suit Secrets

3/27/2016
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Astronauts wear special suits so that they can work many hours in space. Find out about a special accessory they wear, which is very useful if they drank too much Tang in the morning.

Duration:00:01:59

Invisibility Cloaks

3/20/2016
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Scientists have made invisibility cloaks in the laboratory. What does it take to make something invisible? A bit of brain trickery.

Duration:00:02:01

As Sweet As Pi

3/13/2016
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Pi is the mysterious number of 3.14 that keeps our appliances running, our GPS going, and our clocks ticking. This number is pretty sweet.

Duration:00:02:01

How Atoms Keep Time

3/6/2016
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We keep time by measuring repeating patterns, like a swinging pendulum or the earth's rotation. But, the best way to measure time is with atoms inside atomic clocks.

Duration:00:02:01

How Frog's Legs Helped Make the Oscars Possible

2/28/2016
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In the 1700s, a scientist was dissecting frogs and found the legs twitched when touched with his tools. This freaky experiment allows us to make golden statues and get power from batteries.

Duration:00:02:01

Making a Phone Call in Ancient Africa

2/21/2016
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To send messages over long distances, the ancients used a drum. Recently, scientists have discovered how drum beats travel for miles with the help of the surface of the Nile.

Duration:00:02:01