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A Moment of Science

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These vignettes remove some of the mystery from science, but not the wonder. A Moment of Science makes you think "Wow, that's neat!" and go tell somebody else about it. We've all hit our "funny bone." Why does it feel like that? What do bicycles, footballs, and space shuttles have in common? Can you really learn while you are asleep? Why do some birds hop and others walk? These and other questions about the world we live in are answered in A Moment of Science.

These vignettes remove some of the mystery from science, but not the wonder. A Moment of Science makes you think "Wow, that's neat!" and go tell somebody else about it. We've all hit our "funny bone." Why does it feel like that? What do bicycles, footballs, and space shuttles have in common? Can you really learn while you are asleep? Why do some birds hop and others walk? These and other questions about the world we live in are answered in A Moment of Science.
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Location:

Bloomington, IN

Description:

These vignettes remove some of the mystery from science, but not the wonder. A Moment of Science makes you think "Wow, that's neat!" and go tell somebody else about it. We've all hit our "funny bone." Why does it feel like that? What do bicycles, footballs, and space shuttles have in common? Can you really learn while you are asleep? Why do some birds hop and others walk? These and other questions about the world we live in are answered in A Moment of Science.

Language:

English


Episodes

Hot And Bothered Fish

8/19/2019
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Scientists working with two species of damselfish on Australia's Great Barrier Reef discovered that when water temperatures increased by as little as three degrees, fish personalities changed.

Duration:00:01:59

A Spoon’s Double Vision

8/16/2019
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Look at the back of a spoon and your reflection appears right side up. Look into a spoon's bowl, and your reflection's upside down. How come?

Duration:00:01:59

Clouds In The Kitchen

8/15/2019
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Steam is water that's heated to two hundred twelve degrees Fahrenheit. Believe it or not, steam is invisible; you can see right through it.

Duration:00:01:59

Hills In The Ocean

8/14/2019
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In the Western Pacific around New Guinea, there's a watery hill almost 250 feet high. This isn't a hill on the ocean floor, it's a hill in the ocean's surface itself.

Duration:00:01:59

Your Shadow’s Halo

8/13/2019
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A "heiligenshein," is German for halo. This is a glowing light around the head and shoulders of your shadow. It's likely to be seen by early morning golfers on dewy grass.

Duration:00:01:59

Flies That Eat Spiders

8/12/2019
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In most showdowns between spiders and flies, the odds weigh heavily in the spider's favor. Today, however, we'll look at a few species of fly that manage to turn the tables on their eight legged foes.

Duration:00:01:59

When The Sky Turns Green

8/9/2019
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As sunlight enters our atmosphere, it bends slightly. This is due to refraction, the same thing that makes a pencil look slightly askew when you stick it half way into a glass of water.

Duration:00:01:59

Generational Plant Wisdom

8/8/2019
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Information about when to germinate is imprinted by the mother plant in the seeds’ genes—essentially turning certain genes off that regulate germination.

Duration:00:01:59

Microbes Help Form Copper Deposits

8/7/2019
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Copper, gold and silver can’t just be found anywhere buried under the soil. It takes very specific conditions to produce deposits of mineral ores that can be mined.

Duration:00:01:59

Ancient Roman Parasites

8/6/2019
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Researchers at the University of Cambridge found that ancient Romans did not see a reduction in intestinal parasites like whipworm, roundworm and tapeworm, compared to people who lived during earlier ages with less sophisticated sanitation systems.

Duration:00:01:59

The Periodic Table

8/5/2019
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This year, 2019, the periodic table turns 150. It organizes the elements into rows and columns. The seven rows are based on the number of an element’s electron shells.

Duration:00:01:59

Monkey Bonding Through Grooming

8/2/2019
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Monkeys use grooming to reinforce male-female mate bonds as well as same sex friendship bonds.

Duration:00:01:59

Milk Osmosis

8/1/2019
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The sugar added to sweetened condensed milk kills bacteria that would otherwise digest the milk and spoil it. The sugar kills not by poisoning the bacteria, but by a more direct physical process.

Duration:00:01:59

How Young Animals Leave Their Homes

7/31/2019
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Scientists think there are a number of reasons why young animals leave home. By doing so, they avoid competing with their relatives for resources and avoid competing with each other for mates.

Duration:00:01:59

Megachile pluto, The World’s Largest Bee

7/30/2019
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Megachile pluto is the world’s largest bee, and perhaps its most elusive. It is commonly called “Wallace’s giant bee,” after naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, who first collected the bee in 1858.

Duration:00:01:59

Icy Pingos

7/29/2019
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Pingos are like small mountains that form in the permafrost. They are circular or elliptical formations that grow up to 230 feet in height and 2,000 feet in diameter.

Duration:00:01:59

Arthropod House Guests

7/26/2019
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Entomologists from North Carolina State University ran a study that found we share our houses with more than 500 kinds of arthropods.

Duration:00:01:59

Rain On The Rear Window

7/25/2019
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If you glance back at the rear window while driving through a rain shower, you'll notice that while raindrops batter the front windshield, they seem to avoid the back window as long as the car is moving.

Duration:00:01:59

Color-Coded Glass

7/24/2019
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Beer bottles are colored for very specific reasons. if the light-sensitive hops that give the drink flavor are exposed to too much light, the beer will be “light struck,” and will take on a foul taste.

Duration:00:01:59

Mosquitoes and Global Warming

7/23/2019
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Scientists think that as many as a billion people around the world could be newly exposed to the diseases spread by mosquitoes within the next fifty years as global temperatures rise and mosquitoes thrive.

Duration:00:01:59