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American Museum of Natural History Podcast

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The American Museum of Natural History presents over 200 public events each year, including lectures and presentations by scientists, authors, and researchers at the forefront of their fields. These podcasts showcase event highlights, and often reveal the findings of the Museum's own cutting-edge research in genomics, paleontology, astrophysics, biodiversity, and evolutionary biology.

The American Museum of Natural History presents over 200 public events each year, including lectures and presentations by scientists, authors, and researchers at the forefront of their fields. These podcasts showcase event highlights, and often reveal the findings of the Museum's own cutting-edge research in genomics, paleontology, astrophysics, biodiversity, and evolutionary biology.
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Location:

New York, United States

Description:

The American Museum of Natural History presents over 200 public events each year, including lectures and presentations by scientists, authors, and researchers at the forefront of their fields. These podcasts showcase event highlights, and often reveal the findings of the Museum's own cutting-edge research in genomics, paleontology, astrophysics, biodiversity, and evolutionary biology.

Language:

English


Episodes

Jaguar: An Indomitable Beast with Alan Rabinowitz

8/8/2018
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In celebration of International Cat Day and to honor the legacy of zoologist and conservationist Alan Rabinowitz who died August 5, we’re re-publishing a talk he gave at the Museum in 2014. Rabinowitz shares his journey to conserve the jaguar, a species that despite its past resilience, is now on a slide towards extinction. In a story of tenacity and survival, the big cat expert also reveals better strategies for saving other species, and how to save ourselves from immediate and long-term...

Duration:01:28:18

Science Throwdown: Sea vs. Land

8/2/2018
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The world under the waves or the wilds of the land? Which creatures—marine or terrestrial—are the most compelling, intriguing, and inspiring? Comedian and journalist Faith Salie leads two teams of scientific luminaries in this tongue-in-cheek “debate,” featuring categories like “Next Top Predator” and “Sexy Beast.” Panelists include conservationist Carl Safina and animal behavior expert Lori Marino (Team Sea) facing off against zoologist Jarod Miller and primatologist Mireya Mayor (Team...

Duration:00:53:13

Planetary Origin Stories with Alycia Weinberger

6/28/2018
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Swirling disks of dust and gas surround young stars, and these disks contain the building blocks for new planets. It would take 100 million years to see a planet fully form, but luckily there are plenty of planetary systems in development for us to observe. By studying and compiling “snapshots” from nearby star systems, Alycia Weinberger of the Carnegie Institute of Washington takes us on a journey back in time to the origins of planets. This Frontiers Lecture took place on May 14, 2018....

Duration:01:00:54

SciCafe—Orangutans, Obesity, and Human Evolution with Erin Vogel

6/21/2018
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While wild orangutans in the rainforests of Borneo feed on a remarkable variety of plant life, they also endure unpredictable cycles of feast and famine. Erin Vogel of Rutgers University explains how research on these primates’ diet and health may help us to better understand the evolution of early human diets, as well as provide insight into today’s global obesity epidemic. This SciCafe took place on June 6, 2018. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever...

Duration:00:47:15

Visualizing Planets with Radio Telescopes with Meredith Hughes

5/31/2018
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Astronomers have discovered thousands of planets in our galaxy, but how much do we understand about how they are formed? Why, for example, are some planets rocky like ours, while others like Jupiter and Saturn are gaseous? Astrophysicist Meredith Hughes of Wesleyan University explains what we know about planet formation in our own solar system, and breaks down how powerful radio telescopes are helping scientists answer questions about distant systems in our galaxy. This Frontiers Lecture...

Duration:01:06:17

SciCafe: Ocean Locomotion with Frank Fish

5/24/2018
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How can studying ocean life help us to create more efficient technologies? Frank Fish, professor of biology at West Chester University of Pennsylvania, explores how the elegant movements of manta rays and humpback whales are inspiring new and better approaches to engineering. This SciCafe took place on May 2, 2018. Subscribe to the Science@AMNH Podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston. SciCafe: Ocean...

Duration:00:40:41

Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty Breaks Down New Data from the ESA’s Gaia Mission

5/17/2018
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On April 25th, 2018, the European Space Agency’s Gaia observatory released its second data catalog, which includes the distances to a staggering 1.4 billion stars. Museum Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty explains why these new findings are important to astronomers, and how Gaia’s data can help us unlock our galaxy’s past, present, and future.

Duration:00:10:27

SciCafe: Seeing is Believing with Marisa Carrasco

4/30/2018
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How do our brains make sense of the world our eyes see? How does attention affect our perception? And how is it possible to miss things even if they are right in front of us? In her recent SciCafe talk, Marisa Carrasco, a professor of psychology and neural science at New York University, revealed the surprising answers to these questions and demonstrated firsthand how our brains selectively process complex information. This podcast highlights some of the essential questions Carrasco...

Duration:00:14:51

Fishes That Glow: Exploring Biofluorescence and Bioluminescence in the Sea

3/29/2018
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To celebrate our new exhibition, Unseen Oceans, we’re “re-surfacing” earlier podcast episodes about our planet’s last frontier: the oceans. In this SciCafe from 2014, John Sparks, curator in the Department of Ichthyology at the Museum and curator of Unseen Oceans, and Research Associates David Gruber (CUNY) and Vincent Pieribone (John B. Pierce Laboratory at Yale), recount their expedition to the Solomon Islands, part of the Museum’s Explore21 initiative, to study biofluorescence and...

Duration:00:37:44

SciCafe: Trilobite Takedown

2/27/2018
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Although they’ve been extinct for about 252 million years, trilobites still manage to fascinate us today. These fossil arthropods were among the first animals to appear in large numbers, and they lived for almost 300 million years before going extinct. Assistant Curator Melanie Hopkins explains where these diverse creatures fit into the fossil record across the globe, delves into her research on trilobite growth patterns, and discusses the amazing diversity of their shapes. This SciCafe...

Duration:00:42:54

SciCafe: The Science Behind Football

2/2/2018
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Just in time for the Super Bowl this weekend, we’re republishing a podcast about the science behind football. Author Ainissa Ramirez, who spoke at the Museum’s SciCafe a few weeks before the New England Patriots faced off against the Seattle Seahawks at the 2015 Super Bowl, explains how prolate spheroids bounce, why Vince Lombardi was a game theorist, and why woodpeckers don’t get concussions. This podcast was originally published on January 15, 2015. The SciCafe series is proudly...

Duration:00:47:42

SciCafe-The Sixth Extinction: Biodiversity Under Threat

12/27/2017
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Earth is currently experiencing an unprecedented loss of biodiversity, and it has changed dramatically in recent decades. Museum curator Joel Cracraft presents evidence that the Sixth Extinction is here. Join him as he explains where the planet’s future is heading if we continue on our current path. This SciCafe took place on December 6, 2017. To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.

Duration:00:57:39

Frontiers Lecture: Neil deGrasse Tyson and Astronaut Scott Kelly on Life in Space

11/8/2017
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Scott Kelly is a former Navy fighter pilot and test pilot, an engineer, and a retired NASA astronaut who over four space flights accumulated 520 days living in space, a record at the time in 2015. Talking with Hayden Planetarium Director Neil deGrasse Tyson, Captain Kelly shares a glimpse of life in the uniquely unwelcoming environment of space—and the extreme challenges of long-term spaceflight. Part of the monthly Frontiers Lecture series, this conversation took place at the Hayden...

Duration:01:08:28

Joining Forces To Address Wildlife Trafficking

11/2/2017
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Some animals may be too popular for their own good—whether it’s doe-eyed slow lorises, nocturnal primates often sold as pets, or pangolins prized for meat or medicine. Despite increased enforcement, a profitable market continues to threaten these and other endangered species. Museum conservation biologist Mary Blair, who is working with colleagues to understand the dynamics of illegal wildlife trade, suggests that biologists need to team up with economists and anthropologists to better...

Duration:00:28:51

SciCafe: Humans And Conflicts With Bears, Oh My!

10/26/2017
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Anyone who has ever surprised a black bear in their own backyard is already keenly aware of the overlap between human communities and bear habitats. Rae Wynn-Grant, a conservation biologist at the Museum, offered insights into black bear behavior and what humans can do to improve relations with this wide-ranging and adaptable species at a recent SciCafe program, which took place at the Museum on October 4, 2017. For a full transcript of this podcast, please visit Watch a video version of...

Duration:00:48:56

A Smashup of Neutron Stars & Einstein’s Theory of Relativity with Astrophysics Curator Michael Shara

10/16/2017
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Today, scientists announced that they have detected a spectacular collision of two neutron stars some 130 million light years away. The method of discovery is also making news: this was the first time ever that a cosmic event was perceived through both gravitational waves — ripples in space and time — and light—confirming Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which predicted that gravitational waves should travel at the speed of light. More than 1,500 scientists around the world...

Duration:00:21:32

Frontiers Lecture: Why? What Makes Us Curious with Mario Livio

10/12/2017
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Just listen to little kids pester their parents, “But why?” and you know how ingrained human curiosity is. And a good thing too—it drives scientific research, inspires creativity in art and technology, and is a necessary ingredient in every form of storytelling. But have you ever been curious—about curiosity? How did we humans get to be so inquisitive and why? In this podcast, astrophysicist and best-selling author Mario Livio explores the origins and mechanisms of human curiosity. Part of...

Duration:00:50:48

Sputnik: Sixty Years Later with Astrophysicist Michael Shara

10/5/2017
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On October 4, 1957, radio operators picked up beeping sounds from the first man-made satellite ever to orbit the Earth—Sputnik, launched by the Soviet Union. The never-before heard signals ushered in the space age and changed life in space—and on Earth—forever. In this podcast marking the sixtieth anniversary of the launch of Sputnik, Museum Astrophysicist Michael Shara discusses the outsized impact of that beach-ball-sized satellite and those beeps heard ’round world.

Duration:00:14:21

Neil deGrasse Tyson and Carolyn Porco on Voyager and Space Exploration

8/24/2017
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Have you ever pondered that picture of earth as a pale blue dot seen from space? Then you already know something of the work of the space craft Voyager I. In 2012, that same space craft became the first man-made object to leave our solar system and enter interstellar space. Voyager I and its twin Voyager II have continued to gather data from deep space forty years after their launch in 1977. On August 23rd, 2017, PBS aired a documentary–The Farthest–Voyager in Space–that tells the story of...

Duration:00:58:00

2017 Solar Eclipse Facts and Tips

8/15/2017
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On August 21st, 2017, most of North America will experience a solar eclipse, with a select area experiencing a total solar eclipse. To learn more about what an eclipse is, and how to safely view this event, we spoke with museum astrophysicist Jackie Faherty. A full transcript of this podcast will be available at a later date here: To see the path of totality, and more information on the eclipse, visit eclipse2017.NASA.gov. If you liked this episode, subscribe to Science at AMNH and rate us...

Duration:00:16:07