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Sporting Witness

BBC

In the run-up to the London 2012 Olympic Games we bring you a new programme telling the inside story of the key moments from sporting history, that seized the world's attention. Sporting Witness will use archive material and personal recollections from the athletes themselves and those who knew them. The programme will cover well-known Olympic stories - including some that you may not have heard before - but which have mythical status in their home countries.

In the run-up to the London 2012 Olympic Games we bring you a new programme telling the inside story of the key moments from sporting history, that seized the world's attention. Sporting Witness will use archive material and personal recollections from the athletes themselves and those who knew them. The programme will cover well-known Olympic stories - including some that you may not have heard before - but which have mythical status in their home countries.
More Information

Location:

United Kingdom

Networks:

BBC

Description:

In the run-up to the London 2012 Olympic Games we bring you a new programme telling the inside story of the key moments from sporting history, that seized the world's attention. Sporting Witness will use archive material and personal recollections from the athletes themselves and those who knew them. The programme will cover well-known Olympic stories - including some that you may not have heard before - but which have mythical status in their home countries.

Language:

Aboriginal


Episodes

"Muggsy" Bogues - Shortest Player In The NBA

6/23/2018
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In June 1987, there was a major shock at the NBA draft when the Washington Bullets picked the shortest man ever to play top-tier American basketball, Tyrone “Muggsy” Bogues. Measuring just 5 foot 3 inches (160cm), Muggsy went on to have a successful career, earning the respect of his taller colleagues with his aggressive play and ability to snatch the ball. Muggsy Bogues talks to Janet Ball. PHOTO: Muggsy Bogues in action (Getty Images)

Duration:00:09:07

Senegal Stun France in World Cup

6/16/2018
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Former Senegalese player Ferdinand Coly remembers the dramatic opening game of the 2002 football World Cup. It was the first time Senegal had reached the World Cup which was held in South Korea and Japan. France were the reigning World and European champions. The game marked the start of Senegal's run to the quarter finals. Photo: Ferdinand Coly battles French player Emmanuel Petit for the ball, as Thierry Henry looks on. (Photo by Andreas Rentz/Bongarts/Getty Images)

Duration:00:09:51

The World Cup's "Greatest Save"

6/9/2018
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In the latest in our World Cup history series, we go back to 1970 when the English goalkeeper, Gordon Banks, made what’s regarded as the greatest save in the history of the tournament. In a match against Brazil, Banks somehow dived down quickly enough to stop a powerful header from the legendary Pele. He talks to Mina Rzouki. The programme is an Audio Always Production. PHOTO: Gordon Banks saves from Pele (Getty Images)

Duration:00:08:54

The Battle of Santiago

6/2/2018
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In the latest in a World Cup series, we go back to 1962 and probably the most violent match in the history of the tournament. Described by BBC commentator David Coleman as a "stupid and disgusting exhibition", the confrontation between Chile and Italy was marred by spitting, kicking and punch-ups between the players. It's now known as the Battle of Santiago. Richard Murie talks to the former Chilean defender, Humberto "The Cheetah" Cruz. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester Production....

Duration:00:09:03

Iran vs The USA

5/19/2018
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In the second of a World Cup series, Sporting Witness goes back to 1998 and a politically-charged showdown between the USA and Iran. Despite fears of a diplomatic incident, the match went smoothly, ending with an Iranian victory and warm handshakes between the rival players. Freddy Chick talks to Iranian-born FIFA official, Mehrdad Masoud, the man in charge of ensuring a football match did not create a diplomatic crisis, and to the US captain, Thomas Dooley. The programme is a...

Duration:00:09:04

East Germany's World Cup Moment

5/12/2018
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At the 1974 World Cup, the East and West German football teams clashed on German soil in Hamburg. The East Germans had crossed the Berlin Wall for the tournament and - in a moment never to be forgotten - defeated the great West German team of Franz Beckenbauer 1-0. Tim Mansel talks to former East German defender, Gerd Kische, and Klaus-Peter Beese, one of the East German fans allowed by the Stasi secret police to travel to the game. PHOTO: East German forward Juergen Sparwasser (L) scores...

Duration:00:09:07

Gino Bartali - The Cyclist Who Saved Jews From The Holocaust

5/5/2018
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This year's Giro D’Italia cycling race is paying tribute to the great Italian rider, Gino Bartali, during its opening stages in Israel. Bartali was one of the most successful cyclists of the 1930s and 1940s, but it’s now also known that he helped save the lives of hundreds of Jews when the Nazis occupied Italy during World War Two. Alice Gioia talks to Gino Bartali’s granddaughter, Gioia Bartali, and the film-maker Oren Jacoby, who’s researched the rider’s wartime heroism. PHOTO: Gino...

Duration:00:09:06

The Stabbing of Monica Seles

4/28/2018
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Tennis champion Monica Seles was stabbed during a match in Germany on April 30th 1993. She was world number one but the attack set her career back for some time. Jens-Peter Hetch of the German Tennis Federation was there and he has been sharing his memories of the day with Ashley Byrne. Photo: Monica Seles after being stabbed on court at the Hamburg Open Tennis Championships, Germany. Credit: Sipa Press/REX/Shutterstock .

Duration:00:08:53

Jim Clark - Formula One Legend

4/21/2018
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In April 1968, the great Scottish racing driver, Jim Clark, was killed in a crash on the Hockenheim circuit in Germany. Regarded as one of the finest drivers of all time, Clark won two Formula One world championships and the Indianapolis 500 while helping to run the family farm in the Scottish Borders. Simon Watts talks to his friend, the motoring historian, Graham Gauld. PHOTO: Jim Clark (Getty Images)

Duration:00:08:56

Chantal Petitclerc and A Breakthrough For Parasport

4/14/2018
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In 2002, the Commonwealth Games became the first – and only - major international athletics championship to combine able-bodied and parasport competitions in a single, integrated event. The great Canadian wheelchair racer, Chantal Petitclerc, won the first gold medal under the new system. She talks to Simon Watts about what she regards as a breakthrough for the equality of parasport. PHOTO: Chantal Petitclerc in 2002 (Getty Images)

Duration:00:09:16

Jack Nicklaus' Final Triumph

4/7/2018
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In April 1986, the legendary golfer Jack Nicklaus made history by becoming the oldest player ever to win the Masters. Aged 46, the "Golden Bear" took the lead with just one hole to go. Ashley Byrne talks to Tsuneyuki Nakajima, a Japanese golfer who was in contention throughout one of the most exciting tournaments ever played at Augusta. PHOTO: Jack Nicklaus in his prime in the 1970s (BBC)

Duration:00:08:54

Filbert Bayi - Gold For Tanzania!

3/31/2018
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In 1974, the Tanzanian Filbert Bayi won one of the greatest 1500-metre races of all time at the Commonwealth Games in New Zealand. Bayi led from the front and held off a strong field to win gold and set a world record. Bayi is a legendary figure in Tanzania, where he now runs an AIDS charity. He talks to Ashley Byrne. PHOTO: Filbert Bayi on his way to victory (Getty Images)

Duration:00:08:53

Mansour Bahrami - The Great Entertainer of Tennis

3/24/2018
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The Iranian Mansour Bahrami is one of the most popular players in tennis thanks to his trick shots and showmanship - but his life story is equally remarkable. Simon Watts shares some of the highlights from a 2014 interview with the BBC. PHOTO: Mansour Bahrami (Getty Images).

Duration:00:09:00

"The Witches Of The Orient" - Japan's Volleyball Heroines

3/17/2018
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In 1964, the Japanese women's volleyball team became national heroes after winning gold at their home Olympics in Tokyo. Nicknamed the Witches of The Orient, the players were put through a punishing training regime by a former platoon commander in the Japanese imperial army in order to beat the Soviet Union. Their triumph came to symbolise the reemergence of Japan after World War II. Emily Williams reports. PHOTO: The Japanese team with their coach in 1964 (Getty Images)

Duration:00:08:57

Willie O'Ree: The First Black NHL Player

3/10/2018
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In 1958 Canadian Willie O'Ree broke the colour barrier in the National Hockey League. Willie O'Ree was picked to play for the Boston Bruins in the NHL despite suffering a devastating eye injury earlier in his career. The NHL was then made up of just six professional teams based in Canada and the United States. O'Ree had to face horrific racial abuse from both fans and some players when he took to the ice. Alex Last spoke to Willie O'Ree about his memories of being the first elite black ice...

Duration:00:09:26

Sri Lanka's Cricket Triumph

3/3/2018
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In March 1996, Sri Lanka pulled off an unexpected victory in the Cricket World Cup, demolishing a strong Australian team in the final. The win sparked wild celebrations in Sri Lanka, which had never won a tournament before and was still wracked by civil war. Emily Williams talks to the coach of the Sri Lankan team, Dav Whatmore. The programme is a Whistledown Production. PHOTO: Arjuna Ranatunga and Asanka Gurusinha with the Cricket World Cup trophy after Sri Lanka beat Australia in the...

Duration:00:08:54

The "Skategate" Scandal in Ice-Skating

2/24/2018
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At the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, the Canadian figure-skaters Jamie Salé and David Pelletier were victims of one of the biggest scandals in the history of the games. The pair put in a flawless performance in their final routine, but were only awarded a silver medal because one of the judges felt under pressure to vote for their Russian rivals. The decision sparked outrage but, after an investigation that overshadowed the rest of the Olympics, Salé and Pelletier were eventually...

Duration:00:09:09

Franz Klammer

2/17/2018
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At the 1976 Winter Olympics, legendary Austrian skier Franz Klammer took gold in front of a passionate home crowd in one of the greatest downhill races of all time. In 2014, he spoke to Simon Watts. PICTURE: Franz Klammer celebrating with the Austrian crowd in Innsbruck (Getty Images)

Duration:00:08:59

Olympic Luge Death

2/9/2018
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Just hours before the Vancouver Olympics opened in 2010, a young luge athlete from Georgia, Nodar Kumaritashvili, was killed when he crashed in training. Many critics said the sliding track was too fast and too difficult. Modifications to the track were made to make it safer and the competition went ahead, but the episode cast a shadow over the games and shocked the luging community. Rebecca Kesby spoke to Nodar's father, Davit Kumaritashvili. Photo: Candles and flowers left as a tribute...

Duration:00:09:09

Table Tennis Unites Korea

2/3/2018
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In 1991, amid escalating tensions on the Korean peninsula, Pyongyang and Seoul agreed to field a united Korean table tennis team at the world championships in Japan. Previously bitter rivals, players from the North and South spent more than a month training together and eventually bonding. Their experience inspired a hit film in South Korea, where ping pong is a very popular sport. Sporting Witness talks to former South Korean women's champion, Hyun Jung-Hwa.

Duration:00:08:58