TIME's Top Stories-logo

TIME's Top Stories

US News

All of the things you need to know now from the editors of TIME

All of the things you need to know now from the editors of TIME

Location:

United States

Description:

All of the things you need to know now from the editors of TIME

Language:

English


Episodes

U.S. Puts 8,500 Troops on Alert for Possible Deployment to Europe Amid Ukraine Crisis

1/25/2022
Thousands of U.S. troops were put on standby to deploy to eastern Europe as fears of a Russian ground invasion into neighboring Ukraine looms over the European continent. President Joe Biden’s decision to alert the military units on Monday represents an abrupt change in approach to the crisis as tensions worsen along the Ukrainian border. For weeks, the Biden Administration has restrained from mobilizing military forces as it sought to resolve the situation with Moscow diplomatically.

Duration:00:06:13

Column: The Life-Changing Practice That Will Help You Feel More Gratitude

1/25/2022
I spent the first long months of the pandemic in suburban Maryland alone and away from my family. The world beyond my door became a stream of timelines, a social media cascade of triumphs and accomplishments. Everyone else, it seemed, was leaping to new feats in baking, in writing, in everything. Meanwhile, the blank page waited for me, cursor blinking. I struggled to kindle a steady writing practice, to find my way through the suffocating pressure to Be Productive.

Duration:00:05:24

Pandemic Anxiety Is Fueling OCD Symptoms—Even for People Without the Disorder

1/25/2022
Rosalyn (not her real name) had no idea what she intended to do with the three boxes of spaghetti she had just dumped into her shopping cart. She didn’t want them—she certainly didn’t need them—but never mind, she had to buy them. And the spaghetti boxes weren’t the only unwanted items she picked up in the grocery store that day during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Duration:00:11:28

Giving Cash to Low-Income Mothers Linked to Increased Brain Activity in Their Babies, Study Suggests

1/25/2022
New research suggests giving extra cash to low-income mothers can change their infants’ brain development. Brain measurements at age 1 showed faster activity in key brain regions in infants whose low-income families received $300-plus monthly for a year, compared with those who got $20 each month, U.S. researchers reported Monday.

Duration:00:04:10

President Biden Calls Fox Reporter a ‘Stupid Son of a Bitch’ After Question About Inflation

1/25/2022
(WASHINGTON) — President Joe Biden responded to a question about inflation on Monday by calling a Fox News reporter a vulgarity. The president was in the East Room of the White House for a meeting of his Competition Council, which is focused on changing regulations and enforcing laws to help consumers deal with high prices. Reporters in the room shouted a number of questions after Biden's remarks.

Duration:00:02:06

‘Abducted by Luxurious Pirates.’ Cruise Diverts Passengers to Bahamas After U.S. Orders Seizure of Ship

1/24/2022
(MIAMI) — A cruise ship that was supposed to dock in Miami has instead sailed to the Bahamas, after a U.S. judge granted an order to seize the vessel as part of a lawsuit over millions of dollars in unpaid fuel. Cruise trackers show Crystal Symphony currently docked in the Bahamian island of Bimini. “We all feel we were abducted by luxurious pirates!” passenger Stephen Heard Fales posted on Facebook.

Duration:00:03:10

UAE Says It Intercepted 2 Ballistic Missiles Targeting Abu Dhabi

1/24/2022
(DUBAI, United Arab Emirates) — The United Arab Emirates intercepted two ballistic missiles targeting Abu Dhabi early Monday, its state-run news agency reported, the latest attack to target the Emirati capital. The attack on Abu Dhabi, after another last week killed three people and wounded six, further escalates tensions across the Persian Gulf as Yemen's yearslong civil war grinds on.

Duration:00:03:33

Column: Journalists Are Under Threat in El Salvador. I Know Because I Was Targeted

1/24/2022
Becoming a target of one of the most notorious spyware programs in the world has been an unnerving experience. While it has briefly brought the world’s attention to El Salvador, it is just the latest step in an escalating crackdown on press freedoms in the country. Between 2020 and 2021, my cell phone was infected with the Pegasus program—the invasive spying software—for a total of 269 days.

Duration:00:07:33

The Story Behind TIME’s ‘Year One’ Joe Biden Cover

1/24/2022
As President Joseph Biden closes in on his first year in office, the Jan. 31, 2022, TIME cover returns to a familiar setting—a gloomy Oval Office. Artist Tim O’Brien christened Biden’s administration with “Day One,” a Feb. 1, 2021, cover depicting the cluttered mess he was facing upon entering office.

Duration:00:03:25

Cultivated Meat Passes the Taste Test

1/23/2022
Renowned Israeli gastronome Michal Ansky knows her food. She’s a professional taster and a Master Chef judge. So when she was invited to the world’s first public blind taste test pitting lab-grown, or cultivated, chicken up against a conventionally raised product, she jumped at the chance. It was a historic opportunity, but she was also confident that she would be able to tell the difference.

Duration:00:06:32

Column: Democrats Lost Virginia By Ignoring Parents. Snow Days Show They Still Are

1/23/2022
Schools may be a local issue, but how they are run—especially during the pandemic—can stoke the outrage politics that define many state and national races. Democrats, to their grief, learned as much in November when Republican Glenn Youngkin thumped a former Democratic governor by harping on the disastrous performance of the state’s schools when COVID-19 hit. And I got a refresher on a snow day.

Duration:00:08:19

Kid of the Year Finalist Lino Marrero, 15, Invented a Shoe That Can Charge a Cell Phone

1/23/2022
Lino Marrero was leaving cello practice one day when he noticed several blisters on his fingers. The pain was so bad that the 10-year-old inventor from Frisco, Tx. wanted to quit playing the instrument for good, even though he loved music. So he started doing some research online to find a solution. “I learned that a lot of musicians actually quit their instrument because of finger pain,” says Marrero, now 15. “That’s when I realized I need to invent something for this.

Duration:00:05:04

I’m Vaccinated, Boosted and Had COVID-19. Can I Go Back to Normal Now?

1/23/2022
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, A.B.

Duration:00:07:27

Why It’s Still So Complicated to Get Free Home Covid Tests

1/22/2022
This week, nearly two full years into the on-going pandemic, the Biden Administration told Americans that they would, at long last, be given access to free, rapid COVID-19 tests — a key tool in containing the spread of the virus. The government's plan was two-fold. First, on Jan. 15, federal agencies implemented new rules requiring private health insurers to cover at-home tests. And second, on Jan.

Duration:00:08:48

Column: Sharing Personal Stories Won't Move the Needle on Paid Family Leave. Talking About Money Might

1/22/2022
As Omicron spreads across the nation, some schools are going virtual and an unprecedented number of people are testing positive and needing to take time at home to recover or care for loved ones. As a mother to three young children, and a journalist who’s been documenting the impact of the pandemic on moms, this all feels like a grim Groundhog Day. It’s hard to accept that we are all being forced to do all of this, again, without a national paid family leave program.

Duration:00:08:49

After Sweeping Voting-Rights Reform Fails, Senators Shift Focus to Arcane Law That Emboldened Jan. 6 Rioters

1/22/2022
Late Wednesday night, Democratic Senators suffered a stinging defeat when their months-long effort to pass sweeping voting-rights reform was torpedoed by the entire Republican caucus—with help from two of their own: Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema.

Duration:00:08:02

Remembering André Leon Talley: Remarkably Accessible in an Elitist Fashion Industry

1/22/2022
Former Vogue creative director and editor-at-large André Leon Talley, known for his rare combination of exuberance, intellect, and brilliant humor, died on Jan. 18 in White Plains, New York at the age of 73. So many, in and outside of the fashion industry, have shared memories of interactions with him, which is a testament to the kind of person he was; happy to hold forth and share his knowledge—and love—of fashion with anyone interested in hearing them.

Duration:00:08:34

Column: How Our Minds Keep Our Emotions From Getting Out of Control

1/22/2022
In September 1965, James Stockdale was a naval wing commander on his third tour of combat duty over North Vietnam. Flying just above the treetops at nearly 600 miles-per-hour, his A-4 Skyhawk jet ran into a barrage of flak. The plane caught fire and Stockdale ejected. Upon landing he was captured by North Vietnamese troops who beat him so badly that he walked with a limp for the rest of his life.

Duration:00:09:54

Review: Historical Drama Munich: The Edge of War Is the Ultimate Dad Movie—In the Best Way

1/22/2022
Dad movies, at least among those who aren’t actual dads, tend to be undervalued pleasures; they pluck a certain satisfying, resonant chord, often without being particularly flashy. Munich: The Edge of War, directed by Christian Schwochow and adapted from Robert Harris’ 2017 novel, is the ultimate dad movie: its setting is the 1938 Munich conference in which European leaders met with Hitler in an earnest, if naive, attempt to stave off war. That part really happened.

Duration:00:05:40

A Record-Breaking 1.6 Million People Are Now Mired in U.S. Immigration Court Backlogs

1/21/2022
Roughly 1.6 million people are caught up in an ever-expanding backlog in United States immigration court, according to new data tracking cases through December 2021. Those with open immigration cases must now wait for a decision determining their legal status for an average of 58 months—nearly five years.

Duration:00:06:03