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All of the things you need to know now from the editors of TIME

All of the things you need to know now from the editors of TIME

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United States

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All of the things you need to know now from the editors of TIME

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English


Episodes

How Martin Luther King Jr. Changed His Mind About America

1/17/2022
More than fifty years after his death, Martin Luther King Jr. remains a towering figure in the history of American civil rights. As with most influential thinkers, there is a certain amount of ambiguity in the public understanding of King and his legacy. White Americans were very skeptical of King while he was alive, but as his reputation and popularity grew, advocates of very different positions tried to claim him for their own.

Duration:00:06:52

The Enthusiast’s Guide To At-Home COVID-19 Tests

1/17/2022
The COVID era has brought us many new experiences: mask-wearing, remote schooling, sheltering in place. The majority of these have been onerous and dreary. It's amazing how energy-sapping it is to just have to wait for something to be over.

Duration:00:09:29

Democrats’ Odds of Passing Voting Rights Reform Looked Bad Before Biden Went to the Hill—And Worse After He Left

1/17/2022
Joe Biden spent more than three decades in the Senate. He understands its arcane rules. He once showed a prowess for shepherding complex legislation past obstinate Senators from both parties. But as he closes out his first year as President, Biden has failed to get two of his signature legislation efforts past Senators of his own party.

Duration:00:06:18

Column: Voting Rights Isn’t Just a Black Issue

1/17/2022
Ahead of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, President Biden visited the grave of Dr. King in Atlanta and gave the angriest speech of his presidency, insisting that the Senate has a moral obligation to protect voting rights. After months of delay, Senate Leader Chuck Schumer finally moved to at least force open debate on federal voting rights legislation this week. As the nation honors Dr.

Duration:00:06:33

Novak Djokovic Leaves Australia After Losing Deportation Appeal

1/17/2022
MELBOURNE, Australia — Novak Djokovic left Australia on Sunday evening after losing his final bid to avoid deportation and play in the Australian Open despite being unvaccinated for COVID-19. A court earlier unanimously dismissed the No. 1-ranked tennis player’s challenge to cancel his visa. Djokovic, a 34-year-old from Serbia, said he was “extremely disappointed” by the ruling but respected it.

Duration:00:07:03

Column: U.S. Food Prices Are Up. Are the Food Corporations to Blame for Taking Advantage?

1/16/2022
2021 was a bad year for grocery bills. Shoppers paid 6.4% more for groceries in November 2021 compared to November 2020, according to the consumer price index. All food prices were up a bit more than usual but the most dramatic price increases come from meat, pork cost 14% more than a year ago and beef cost 20% more. These increases are slowing, per consumer price data released January 12th, but show no signs of dropping to pre-pandemic levels anytime soon.

Duration:00:12:16

Nose or Throat? The Best Way to Swab for At-Home COVID-19 Tests

1/16/2022
The first challenge with rapid at-home self tests for COVID-19 is getting one. But once you have a test, there are now growing questions about what body part you should swab to get the most accurate and reliable results. Your nose? Throat? Cheek? What about your saliva? All of the self tests authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are validated only with nasal samples.

Duration:00:09:43

Older Americans Are the Ignored Victims of the Opioid Epidemic

1/16/2022
Death certificates have dispelled any doubts about just how devastating the opioid epidemic is. Between May 2020 and April 2021, drug overdoses caused more than 100,000 deaths in the U.S., according to provisional data from the National Center for Health Statistics. And a new analysis suggests that many of these deaths are from a somewhat surprising group: older Americans. In adults ages 55 and older, opioid overdose deaths rose tenfold between 1999 and 2019, surging from 0.

Duration:00:06:19

“A Huge Mistake.” The E.U. Jeopardizes its Climate Goals By Labeling Natural Gas as Green

1/16/2022
A long-simmering debate about the future of natural gas has been forced to a head in Europe this month, as the E.U. considers classifying some projects involving the fossil fuel as sustainable investments in official advice for the private sector due to be published by the end of January. Burning natural gas produces carbon dioxide—but around 50% less than burning coal. The E.U.

Duration:00:10:42

Column: Don't Sell Your Fossil-Fuel Stock If You Want to Make a Climate-Change Difference in 2022

1/16/2022
In 2022, investors who want to address climate change should focus on one simple but essential goal: active stock ownership. They should engage with companies on both sides of the energy transition–those heading in the right direction and those falling woefully short and move away from blame and toward responsibility. Engine No.

Duration:00:04:35

Kid of the Year Finalist Kai Shappley, 11, Takes on Lawmakers in Her Fight for Trans Rights

1/16/2022
Kai Shappley didn’t feel scared when she sat before the Texas Senate committee in April 2021. Wearing a flowing yellow blouse, floral skirt and cowboy boots, the then-4th grader calmly introduced herself. “I love ballet, math, science and geology. I spend my free time with my cats, chickens, FaceTiming my friends and dreaming of when I finally get to meet Dolly Parton,” she testified. “I do not like spending my free time asking adults to make good choices.

Duration:00:07:18

Why You Shouldn’t Exercise to Lose Weight

1/16/2022
Many of us are lacing up our sneakers and starting (or restarting) exercise regimens in hopes of shedding unwanted pounds. Unquestionably, aiming to be more active is a good thing. But if the main reason is to lose weight, your New Year’s resolution could very well backfire. For starters, exercise—at least the kind most of us do—is typically ineffective for weight loss. Take walking, for example.

Duration:00:06:00

Why You Shouldn’t Exercise to Lose Weight

1/16/2022
Many of us are lacing up our sneakers and starting (or restarting) exercise regimens in hopes of shedding unwanted pounds. Unquestionably, aiming to be more active is a good thing. But if the main reason is to lose weight, your New Year’s resolution could very well backfire. For starters, exercise—at least the kind most of us do—is typically ineffective for weight loss. Take walking, for example.

Duration:00:05:58

‘I Was Just Thinking About My Son.’ Shot In His Own Home, a Gun Violence Victim Shares His Story

1/15/2022
Across the U.S. in 2021, tens of thousands of people were shot. They were shot in schools and supermarkets, in churches and offices, in the streets and in their homes. Many were killed, many more were injured; the vast majority of victims were within inner-city communities. And as staggering as the total is, it does not speak to the ripple effect and trauma that these incidents cause. Here is one of those victims' stories.

Duration:00:06:08

Sen. Sherrod Brown Has Some Thoughts About ‘Succession’

1/15/2022
On the evening of Jan. 3, Connie Schultz, the Pulitzer-winning syndicated columnist and author, was trying to watch HBO’s Succession, but she kept having to pause it because something reminded her husband of his work. “I am watching #Succession with the chairman of the Senate banking committee,” Schultz informed her quarter-million Twitter followers, “and holy cannoli the ongoing commentary.” Neither Schultz nor the husband in question, Sen.

Duration:00:07:20

There’s a Way to End Energy Poverty—And It Has the Side Effect of Making Fossil Fuels Obsolete

1/15/2022
You bring your feverish baby to the hospital in the middle of the night. The nurse asks you to go home to get a flashlight. When the flashlight batteries give out, she resorts to a flickering candle to guide the insertion of an IV needle, delivering malaria medicine, into your baby’s hand. Maybe you don’t have a baby. Maybe you travel 14 miles a day by public bus to buy fresh fish to sell in your village.

Duration:00:05:46

Lindsey Vonn: The World Deemed Me ‘Dramatic’ for My Injuries. A Man Would’ve Been Called Resilient

1/15/2022
Toward the end of the 2015–2016 ski season, I was on a competitive high. I had come back from multiple crashes in 2013 and 2014 that left me with a swath of injuries, particularly to my knees, and I was winning race after race. Everything was going so well that with a few weeks still left, I’d already compiled enough points to win the season-long downhill title, and I was on pace to win the overall title as well. Then my great run came to an end.

Duration:00:08:33

How Cheer Season 2 Handles the Jerry Harris Child Porn Allegations

1/15/2022
When the Netflix documentary series Cheer was released in early 2020, its viral success made a follow-up season inevitable. The show, following an elite cheerleading team at Navarro College in Texas, became an immediate hit. But in the year after the show premiered, a disturbing scandal brought into question whether it would or even could continue.

Duration:00:07:03

Dana Schwartz Wrote the YA Romance She Always Wanted to Read

1/15/2022
You might recognize Dana Schwartz’s name, it’s just a matter of where you’ve seen it. Some know her as the creator and host of the Noble Blood podcast, where she tells the stories of royals past; others through the parody Twitter account @GuyinyourMFA, which she started when she was a college student in 2013.

Duration:00:07:51

An N95 Is the Best Mask for Omicron. Here’s Why

1/14/2022
As health officials scramble to minimize spread of the highly contagious Omicron variant, many experts have recommended that people switch from cloth or surgical masks to more-protective N95 and KN95 masks. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) current mask guidance does not recommend one type of mask over another, instead specifying that people should wear a mask that fits snugly and covers the nose and mouth. CDC Director Dr.

Duration:00:09:37