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Being Human

3 Favorites

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Location:

United States

Language:

English

Contact:

412.624.3932


Episodes

Writing and Communities: A Conversation with John Edgar Wideman

12/1/2017
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An interview with author John Edgar Wideman. The interview focuses on Wideman's life and career, particularly connections between his writing and the various communities of which he has been a part. The conversation also features Leon Ford, a social activist in Pittsburgh. Ford was shot by police in 2012 and is paralyzed as a result. He currently works for social justice in Pittsburgh, and has developed a relationship with Wideman based on their mutual investment in writing. For more on...

Duration: 01:19:58


Race, Justice, and What Philosophers Do: An Interview with Tommie Shelby

11/3/2017
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An interview with Tommie Shelby, Caldwell Titcomb Professor of African and African American Studies and of Philosophy at Harvard University. The interview focuses on Dr. Shelby's life and career, particularly his work on race and justice.

Duration: 00:47:11


Museums and the Ethics of Engagement: An Interview with Janet Marstine

10/30/2017
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An interview with Janet Marstine, Academic Director of the Art Museum and Gallery Studies program at the University of Leicester. The interview focuses on Dr. Marstine's life and career, particularly her work on museums and ethical practice. For information on Theaster Gates' piece "To Speculate Darkly," see here: www.chipstone.org/exhibitionframe.…peculate-Darkly/. Robert Fontenot's "Recycle LACMA": www.robertfontenot.com/new-page-1/. Ansuman Biswas's "Manchester Hermit":...

Duration: 00:42:36


Imprints, Episode 3

7/29/2017
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In the final episode of Imprints, media fellow Matt Moret interviews Julie Beaulieu, a lecturer in Pitt's Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies program. The conversation focuses on the program's new major and ways that educational institutions can become more diverse, inclusive spaces.

Duration: 00:33:42


Rudolph Ware

7/7/2017
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An interview with Rudolph Ware, professor of history at the University of Michigan. The interview focuses on Professor Ware's life and career, particularly his recent book The Walking Qur’an: Islamic Education, Embodied Knowledge, and History in West Africa. The novel we discuss during the conversation is Ambiguous Adventure, by Cheikh Hamidou Kane.

Duration: 00:58:22


Rafael Campo

6/2/2017
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Rafael Campo is an award-winning poet and professor of medicine at Harvard University. This interview focuses on Professor Campo's life and career, particularly his belief that poetry has an important role to play in providing effective medical care.

Duration: 00:50:11


Imprints, episode 2

5/22/2017
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In the second episode of Imprints, Humanities Media Fellow Matt Moret features a panel discussion titled "More Just Communities--From Stories to Action." The panel was part of the 2017 Pittsburgh Humanities Festival, and featured Lindsay Houpt-Varner, director of Greater Carlisle Heart and Soul, Chris Ivey, documentary filmmaker and director of the East of Liberty series, and Jason Schupbach, who oversees placemaking partnerships with the NEA.

Duration: 00:39:03


Mabel Wilson

5/5/2017
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An interview with Mabel Wilson, architect, designer, and professor of architecture at Columbia University. The interview focuses on Professor Wilson's life and career, including her 2012 book "Negro Building: Black Americans in the World of Fairs and Museums." The website for Who Builds Your Architecture?, which we discuss in the interview, can be found here: whobuilds.org

Duration: 00:38:18


Imprints, episode 1

4/12/2017
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In the first episode of Imprints, Humanities Media Fellow Matt Moret profiles the Pennsylvania Humanities Council and how it is working to revitalize some of Pennsylvania's most vulnerable communities.

Duration: 00:26:32


George Gopen

2/3/2017
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An interview with George Gopen, professor emeritus of the practice of rhetoric at Duke University and creator of the Reader Expectation Approach to writing. The interview focuses on Professor Gopen's life and career, and the innovations he brought to teaching writing by focusing on the reader rather than the writer.

Duration: 00:54:57


Michael Chabon

1/6/2017
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Michael Chabon published his first novel, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, in 1988. Since then he has published an incredible array of fiction and non-fiction, including novels, young adult fiction, detective stories, screenplays, short stories, and essays. He is rightly viewed as one of our country's most versatile writers, and has also been recognized with some of our most prestigious awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Klay in 2001. His new novel...

Duration: 01:15:15


Laura Snyder

12/2/2016
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Laura Snyder is a professor of philosophy at St. John’s University. Her work focuses on the history and philosophy of science, and frequently seeks to bring new, broader perspectives to debates in that field. Her first book, Reforming Philosophy, focuses on John Stuart Mill and William Whewell’s philosophies of science, but argues that this philosophy can only properly be understood in the context of Mill and Whewell’s entire body of work. Her second book, the Philosophical Breakfast Club,...

Duration: 00:33:37


Petra Kuppers

11/4/2016
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An interview with Petra Kuppers, professor of English at the University of Michigan, as well as a poet, filmmaker, artist, and disability activist. The interview focuses on the politics of Professor Kuppers' scholarship and art. We pay particular attention to her latest book of poetry, Pearl Stitch.

Duration: 00:40:39


Ursula Heise

10/7/2016
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Ursula Heise is the Marcia H. Howard Chair in Literary Studies at UCLA. She is best known for her work in environmental criticism and environmental humanities, fields she began exploring in the late 90’s. Her 2008 book Sense of Place and Sense of Planet has been described as a landmark book for inaugurating attention to globalism in environmental thinking. This book was at the heart of a recent retrospective in the journal Resilience, which noted that her work has created a network of...

Duration: 00:43:05


Jeff Williams

9/2/2016
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Jeff Williams is a professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University. Professor Williams’ work focuses on the politics of literature and criticism, particularly institutions that produce culture like universities and academic journals. In his writing, he frequently takes a step back from arguments about the political or social value of intellectual work and examines them from a practical standpoint. In many of his essays since the early 90’s, he has called attention to the danger of...

Duration: 00:38:35


Theresa Brown

8/5/2016
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Our guest today is Theresa Brown, oncology nurse, columnist, and author of The Shift: One Nurse, Twelve Hours, Four Patients’ Lives. Theresa began her career as a writer in 2008 when she published an essay in the New York Times about a dramatic and emotional experience she had with a dying patient. The piece received national attention, and was anthologized in the Best American Science Writing and The Best American Medical Writing in 2009. Since then, she has written dozens of pieces about...

Duration: 00:33:29


Lydia Goehr

6/30/2016
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Lydia Goehr is a professor of philosophy at Columbia University. Her work focuses on aesthetic theory, particularly the history and philosophy of music. Her first book, The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works, was widely influential for its exploration of what she calls the “work-concept,” or the set of beliefs and assumptions that have governed the West's performance and appreciation of music for the last 200 years. In her book, Professor Goehr shows various implications of the...

Duration: 00:37:27


Mark Jarzombek

6/3/2016
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Mark Jarzombek is perhaps best known as one of the country’s leading advocates for global architectural history, and co-author of the 2006’s groundbreaking textbook “A Global History of Architecture.” Rather than supplementing a Eurocentric narrative with new countries or continents, Jarzombek’s work reconceieves architectural history as a constant flow of knowledge and technology within and across cultures. This shift puts buildings in new, broader perspectives, but also requires...

Duration: 00:33:48


Marcia Chatelain

4/7/2016
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Marcia Chatelain is an associate professor of history at Georgetown University. Dr. Chatelain’s research focuses on a wide range of issues in African American history, including African American migration, women and girls history, and race and food. Her first book, South Side Girls: Growing Up in the Great Migration, focuses on the experience of the great migration for young African American women—a group of people that scholars frequently fail to recognize or fully explore. In 2014, she...

Duration: 00:30:56


Peter Holland

4/7/2016
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This episode features an interview with Peter Holland, the McMeel Family Chair in Shakespeare Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Professor Holland is one of the leading critics of Shakespeare-in-performance, and has published on Shakespeare in a wide variety of formats, including scholarly journals, books, dictionary entries, and theater programs. For all of his scholarly acumen, listeners will quickly learn that Professor Holland is deeply committed to the idea that Shakespeare (and...

Duration: 00:39:18

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