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Curling Legends Podcast

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A weekly conversation with the players and storytellers who shaped Curling in the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s.

A weekly conversation with the players and storytellers who shaped Curling in the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s.
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A weekly conversation with the players and storytellers who shaped Curling in the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s.








Episode 36 - Joan McCusker

Joan McCusker takes humour seriously. The 1998 Gold medal winning Schmirler Rink almost never happened because Joan and Marcia were concerned that Jan and Sandra were too intense. Eventually they agreed and everything clicked. Their team had balance, with Joan providing levity when it was needed most. She shares her days growing up on the farm and learning to curl at a two sheeter. We cover her University days, playing with sister Cathy and the early Scotties and Olympic experiences. Joan...


Episode 35 - Pal Trulsen

Pal Trulsen was supposed to be a ski jumper. It was the sport of his father. Admittedly, Pal was a little too husky and grew tired of walking to the top of the hill for each run. At 14 he and three friends (Flemming Davanger, Stig-Arne Gunnestad and Kjell Berg) discovered a four sheet curling club and took to the sport, eventually reaching the Uniroyal World Junior Championships in 1980. They returned in 1981 and then again in 1983, where they won a Silver medal, losing to Canada's John Base...


Episode 34 - John Aasand

John Aassand doesn't live in the past. In 1972 four young players from Grafton, North Dakota competed in their first mens playdowns. From State to US Nationals and then to Germany, their magical run would eventually land them in the finals of the World Championship against Canada's Orest Meleschuk. Johnny at second, his brother Frank at third, lead Ray Morgan and skip Robert Labonte took a 9-7 lead into the 10th end. After what was thought to be the final rock of the game, with players...


Episode 33 - Kim Kelly

Kim Kelly understands what it takes to overcome adversity. Her father in the armed forces, Kelly moved often and had to adapt to new people and surroundings every few years. The local military curling club was always available to hone her skills and make new friends. After high school, Kelly returned to her birthplace of Halifax, Nova Scotia and eventually joined Nancy Delahunt, Mary-Anne Arsenault and Colleen Jones to form one of the most successful teams of all time. From 1999 to 2004,...


Episode 32 - Bob Cole

Bob Cole is more than the iconic play-by-play announcer for Hockey Night in Canada. As a young broadcaster in St. John's, Newfoundland, Bob was introduced to curling and immediately became hooked. Despite his late start to the sport, regular practice led to early success with a trip to the Canadian Mixed in 1965, only the second time it was contested. Bob improved his game and eventually landed at skip, leading his team to the 1971 Brier in Quebec City. Afterwards, he recruited a youngster...


Episode 31 - Marilyn Bodogh, Part 2

In Part 2 of my conversation with Marilyn Bodogh, we'll dive into the 1996 Scotties playoffs against Connie Laliberte and Cheryl Bernard. She explains how to deal with trash talk from Dordi Nordby and warns of the dangers from Chinese food. Marilyn shares her thoughts on Colleen Jones, the Olympic Trials, both Battles of the Sexes and reveals what to wear under your kilt when you are on the ice.


Episode 30 - Marilyn Bodogh, Part 1

Marilyn Bodogh may have appeared brash, opinionated, outspoken or a little unfiltered. But behind the newsworthy quotes and smiles for the camera was a competitive drive to rival any of her contemporaries. Learning the game in St. Catherines, Marilyn and her older sister Christine had early junior success at the Canada Winter Games in 1971. In 1980 the sisters appeared in the Canadian Ladies Curling Association Championship (two years before Scott Paper took over sponsorship). Marilyn...


Episode 29 - Alfie Phillips

Alfie Phillips Jr. had a tough act to follow. His father, Alf Sr., was an Olympian diver, a carnival showman and, despite taking up the game in his 40s, a provincial curling champion. In 1956, Ontario was poised to win the Brier for the first time since 1939, but Billy Walsh from Manitoba made what became one of the greatest shots in Brier history. Alfie joined up with his dad shortly after that loss, then later formed his own rink with John Ross, Ron "Moon" Manning and Keith Riley. In...


Episode 28 - Jim Ursel

Jim Ursel had one of the smoothest deliveries of his era. He came a long way from the early days of knee sliding on a two sheet rink of natural ice in Glenella, Manitoba. After moving to Winnipeg, Jim improved enough to win the 1954 Provincial School Boys Championship. We discuss Jim's early days and his development as a player, eventually landing at the famous Strathcona Club. He recalls teaming up with Norm Houk and playing in his first Brier in 1962. We reflect on his move to Montreal,...


Episode 27 - Lorraine Lang

Lorraine Lang could be considered part of the first family of Thunder Bay curling. Despite starting later than most, Lorraine has put together a resume to rival her spouse. While husband Rick had success playing third for Al Hackner, Lorraine appeared in 8 Scotties, including 2 victories as vice for Heather Houston in 1988 and '89. Along with Diane Adams and Tracy Kennedy, they took home silver from their first trip to the World Championship in Glasgow and a gold the following year in...


Episode 26 - Peja Lindholm

Peja Lindholm began curling outdoors at age 11. Learning the game with his friends, Peja eventually led teams to three World Junior Championships, capturing gold, silver and bronze. With his longtime teammates Thomas Nordin, Magnus Swartling and Peter Narup, he captured three World Mens titles for Sweden in 1997, 2001 and 2004. Peja discusses his early days and the development of both his game and that of European curling during the 80's and 90's. We discuss the transition to the free...


Episode 25 - Arnold Asham

Arnold Asham is a curler, dancer, inventor, showman and in his words, an opportunist. From his early days in Reedy Creek, Manitoba, Arnold dreamed he would be a millionaire in the sports industry. Curling became his passion and eventually the red brick slider, along with hard work and dedication to what to others deemed a foolish pursuit, led to his financial success. But there was also a desire to compete against the great teams that wore his corporate logo. When he teamed up with a young...


Episode 24 - Wally Ursuliak

Wally Ursuliak has had quite a life. From Brier Champion with Hector Gervais, to corn broom salesman, camp instructor, then curling missionary in Japan to selling granite from Ailsa Craig, all while running an amusement ride business across Alberta. We'll cover Wally's introduction to curling, and his relationship with Hector, Ray, Don and Herb Olson. He shares stories of the big games and many characters of that era, before explaining why he left the competitive game to become a builder....


Episode 23 - Paul Savage, Part 2

In Part 2 of my conversation with Paul Savage, we'll cover the 1987 Olympic Curling Trials and the controversy surrounding the qualification process. We talk about the early days of the Skins format, the Battle of the Sexes and Paul's experience as fifth man with the Mike Harris Rink during their run to a Silver Medal at the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan. There are a few extras after our talk as well. Paul shares stories from the Kurl for Kids Celebrity Bonspiel, Men With Brooms,...


Episode 22 - Paul Savage, Part 1

Paul Savage always believed curling should be a fun game. From his early days at the Parkway Club, he learned from Alfie Phillips Jr. how to generate points from drawing around guards. The result was his nickname "The Round Mound of Come Around", and four Brier appearances as skip for Ontario during the 1970s. For three of those events, the squad included a young firefighter from Benito, Manitoba. Ed Werenich would leave Paul's rink near the end of the 70s, but they would rejoin in 1982 to...


Episode 21 - Cathy King

Cathy King keeps on curling. Growing up in Edmonton, she played many sports. Winter evenings included time spent around the dinner table discussing curling strategy with the whole family. Older brothers Robb and Chris won the 1974 Canadian School Boys and when Cathy skipped her team to a successful National Junior Womens Championship in 1977, curling appeared to be near the top of her list. After a repeat win in 1978, the only thing missing was a World Championship, but that wouldn't be...


Episode 20 - Don Duguid

Don Duguid was curling before the Allies took Berlin. In 1943, at 8 years old, Don and brothers Gerry and Lorne would throw rocks at the CPR Curling Club where their father was the ice-maker. Initially Don fell out of the hack with two feet, but eventually his father helped him develop the original Manitoba tuck delivery that is still seen today. His parents moved him to the Granite curling club and at twenty he was recruited by Howard Wood Sr, then 70 years young. There was a Brier...


Episode 19 - Jack MacDuff

Jack MacDuff is a true Maritimer. He now lives in New Brunswick, was born in Nova Scotia but is perhaps best known for his short stay in Newfoundland during the 1970's when he skipped the first and (so far) only Brier winning team from that province. Growing up in Lunenburg, NS, Jack would finish playing hockey, then swap his skates for Ken Watson curling boots and cross over to the rink to throw rocks until days end. In those practice sessions, he would play 12 end games against the...


Episode 18 - Don Barcome

Don Barcome always loved to curl. He was introduced to the game after his family moved to Grand Forks, North Dakota in the mid-60's. By the age of 11 he was playing with mens teams in the local club league, and by 13 he was skipping against Orest Meleschuk in the fourth event final of the Hibbing Last Chance Bonspiel. His first taste of International competition came in 1976 when his team of brother Earl and Gary Mueller at front end, along with Gary's brother Dale, traveled to Scotland...


Episode 17 - Ron Northcott

Ron Northcott was Alberta curling in the 1960s. From 1963 to 1969, Ron (AKA "The Owl") won the Alberta Tankard six times, five as a skip. He went on to win the Macdonald Brier in three of those appearances, ('66,'68 and '69) following each with a victory at the World Championship, including the first ever Air Canada Silver Broom in 1968. Those Brier championship rinks each had a different third (George Fink, Jimmy Shields and Dave Gerlach), but the dominant front end of lead Fred Storey...


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