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Location:

Boston, MA

Networks:

WGBH

Description:

Weekly lecture by pundits, poets, and people with something to say.

Language:

English

Contact:

WGBH, P.O. Box 200, Boston, MA 02134.


Episodes

Anna Lappe and Frances Moore Lappe: Diet for a Hot Planet

9/24/2012
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Anna Lappe and Frances Moore Lappe, a mother and daughter pair who have revolutionized the way we think about food, hunger, and climate change discuss Anne Lappe's new book, Diet for a Hot Planet: The Climate Crisis at the End of Your Fork and What You Can Do About It.In 1971, Frances Moore Lappe's Diet for a Small Planet sparked a revolution in how we think about hunger, alerting millions to the hidden environmental and social impacts of our food choices. Now, nearly four decades later,...

Duration: 00:59:48


Renaissance Roots of Modern Science

9/9/2012
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Toby Lester, author of widely acclaimed books on two of the great achievements during the Renaissance, visits with Science for the Public to discuss important discoveries, and rediscoveries, that brought about the first map to show America (The Fourth Part of the World (2009), and Da Vinci's iconic Vitruvian Man (Da Vinci's Ghost) (2012). Both of these accomplishments reflected an intellectual shift over centuries that led to modern science.

Duration: 00:08:18


Anna Lappe and Frances Moore Lappe: Diet for a Hot Planet

9/2/2012
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Anna Lappe and Frances Moore Lappe, a mother and daughter pair who have revolutionized the way we think about food, hunger, and climate change discuss Anne Lappe's new book, Diet for a Hot Planet: The Climate Crisis at the End of Your Fork and What You Can Do About It.In 1971, Frances Moore Lappe's Diet for a Small Planet sparked a revolution in how we think about hunger, alerting millions to the hidden environmental and social impacts of our food choices. Now, nearly four decades later,...

Duration: 00:08:32


String Theory and the Universe's Hidden Dimensions

8/26/2012
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Shing-Tung Yau, chair of Harvard's mathematics department, and science journalist Steve Nadis discuss their new explication of string theory, The Shape of Inner Space: String Theory and the Geometry of the Universes Hidden Dimensions. String theory says we live in a 10-dimensional universe, but that only four are accessible to our everyday senses. According to theorists, the missing six are curled up in bizarre structures known as Calabi-Yau manifolds. In The Shape of Inner Space,...

The Life of Super-Earths: How the Hunt for Alien Worlds Will Revolutionize

8/19/2012
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Astronomer Dimitar Sasselov discusses his book The Life of Super-Earths: How the Hunt for Alien Worlds and Artificial Cells Will Revolutionize Life on Our Planet. Sasselov discusses current efforts to search for other planets that may hold the key to this answer. Sasselov, the founding director of Harvard University’s Origins of Life Initiative, shows how the search for “super-Earths”—rocky planets like our own that orbit other stars—may provide the key to answering essential questions...

Alzheimer's Prevention Program

8/12/2012
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Alzheimer’s disease currently afflicts 5 million Americans; one American is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s every 70 seconds, and right now the only cure is prevention. Can Alzheimer’s really be prevented? What are the new research techniques being used to study Alzheimer’s disease? And what do they show us about the possibilities for preventing or delaying its degenerative effects?In his new book, The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program, Dr. Gary Small looks at what Alzheimer's disease actually is...

Connectome: How the Brain's Wiring Makes Us Who We Are

8/5/2012
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MIT neuroscientist Sebsatian Seung discusses his book Connectome: How the Brain's Wiring Makes Us Who We Are.Seung is at the forefront of a revolution in neuroscience. He believes that our identity lies not in our genes, but in the connections between our brain cells—our own particular wiring. Seung and a dedicated group of researchers are leading the effort to map these connections, neuron by neuron, synapse by synapse — a development previously unobtainable due to the incredible...

David Weinberger: Too Big to Know

7/29/2012
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David Weinberger, senior researcher at the Berkman Center discusses his latest book, Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room. Knowledge used to be a more straightforward matter than it is now; answers came from books or experts. But in the Internet age, knowledge has moved onto networks. There is more knowledge than ever, but it is different: topics have no boundaries, and...

Oceanographer Sylvia Earle Discusses The World is Blue

7/22/2012
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Marine biologist Sylvia Earle, discusses her latest book, The World Is Blue, which reveals a global ecosystem on the brink of irreversible environmental crisis unless we act immediately.Sylvia Earle, the first woman to walk freely on the ocean floor (at a depth of 1,250 feet), has been called “Her Deepness” by The New Yorker and The New York Times. An Explorer-in-Residence at the National Geographic Society since 1998 and named Time magazine’s first “hero for the planet,” Earle has been at...

The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos

7/15/2012
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Current research rooted in quantum mechanics, cosmology, and string theory concurs that our universe is actually only one of many “bubbles” in a rapidly growing bath of universes. Interviewed by author Amir Aczel, hear what physicist Brian Greene has to say about the strange worlds of the “multiverse” in his new book The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos. Greene is recognized for groundbreaking discoveries in superstring theory and was called the “single...

Duration: 00:11:13


Michael Nielsen: Reinventing Discovery

7/8/2012
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Michael Nielsen, a pioneer of quantum computing, discusses the concept of "open science" and the need to change the way scientific research is conducted and the way data is handled in the modern scientific era. How is technology revolutionizing the way scientific problems are solved? How can a system traditionally based on individual discovery adapt to support collaboration and teamwork?

Conservation Lessons from Ice Age Extinctions

7/1/2012
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Sharon Levy, author of Once and Future Giants: What Ice-Age Extinctions Tell Us about the Fate of Earth’s Largest Animals, discusses what we can learn from extinctions in the remote past. Today, great beasts like elephants, lions and grizzly bears are threatened worldwide. New research on the demise of Ice Age giants like the mastodon and saber toothed cat now offers vital insights for modern conservation. Scientists have long debated whether prehistoric people drove large Ice Age animals...

Duration: 00:07:26


What's Your DNA Profile Doing in a Federal Database?

6/24/2012
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In 1998 the FBI officially launched its Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) that linked the DNA collections of 50 states. Forensic DNA has revolutionized criminal investigation. However, there are many things the public does not know about the way DNA profiles are collected and used, and there is also a mystique about the infallibility of DNA matches in criminal investigations. Sheldon Krimsky, professor of urban and environmental policy and planning at Tufts University, explores these...

Duration: 00:08:25


Unraveling the Secrets of Viruses

6/17/2012
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John Connor of the Boston University School of Medicine explains how viruses are minimal structures, but many types, such as HIV and Ebola, can be lethal. Although genetically much simpler than the organisms they infect, viruses are able to pirate the machinery of cells to replicate themselves. Because of their ability to mutate rapidly, viruses often outpace the defenses of the organisms they attack. The Connor Lab studies the mechanisms that make viruses so successful, and they are...

The Human Genome Project: Gateway to Understanding Ourselves

6/10/2012
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Professor John Quackenbush of the Harvard School of Public Health discusses how DNA-sequencing technology is changing how we think of ourselves as a species by providing new insights about our earliest ancestors and reconfirming our inextricable link to all life on earth. He also explores the legal and ethical questions surrounding such controversial topics as stem cell research, prenatal testing, forensics, and cloning.

Eye-to-Eye with Climate Change in the Ocean

6/3/2012
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Dr. Les Kaufman of Boston University describes the sweeping transformation in the world ocean, brought about by climate change and also by pollution and over-fishing. His examples are global: from the most remote coral atolls of the Pacific nation of Kiribati, to the threatened waterfronts and fisheries of Massachusetts.

Yahoo! and YouTube: Balancing Human Rights and Business

5/20/2012
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How do companies such as Yahoo! and YouTube decide on whether disturbing material should be banned from their sites? What are the free speech and human rights issues involved? What guidelines do they use? This informative workshop hosted by Rachel Davis, research fellow at the Harvard Kenedy School explores these questions and more. From the Carnegie Council for the Ethics in International Affairs.

Duration: 00:04:00


Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and L

5/13/2012
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Well-known blogger Jeff Jarvis celebrates what he calls the "emerging age of publicness," arguing that anything we have to fear in this new networked world is overwhelmingly outweighed by all the good that will come from it. From the Carnegie Council for Ethics in international Affairs.

The Politics of Food's Environmental Footprint

5/6/2012
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The business of growing, processing, transporting and storing food has a substantial impact on the environment. How is that impact calculated, and who calculates it? Susanne Freidberg, professor of grograhy at Dartmouth College, discusses these issues and others with Science for the Public.

Noam Chomsky: Language and Other Cognitive Processes

4/29/2012
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The nature of human language is still not completely understood. How do infants learn language? How does it fit in with other cognitive processes? Noam Chomsky, noted linguist, philosopher, and social critic explores the complexities of language and its study in this lecture given at Boston College.

Duration: 00:10:45

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