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History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, Civil War-logo

History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, Civil War

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#73: Why Wasn’t There a Scientific Revolution Under the Romans? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/24/2017
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Scientific progress has moved steadily forward across much of the world for centuries, with few examples of abatement. The Scientific Revolution is often considered to have begun at Copernicus's 1543 publication of On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres. Here moderns challenged the ideas of ancient scholars, rather than accepting them at face value. Most fault the so-called Dark Ages for this millenium-long lull in human intellectual progress lasting from the fall of Rome to the...

Duration: 00:11:10


#72: What if the Nazis Had Won World War Two? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/23/2017
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This episode is fifth in our Alternate History Week series, where I look at famous books of alternate history and discuss why I think their alternate timelines aren't plausible. The Man in the High Castle is Phillip K. Dick's most chilling book and the most famous example of alternate history. It's set in 1962, fifteen years after the Axis Powers emerge triumphant in World War Two and rule over the former United States. Germany and Japan were victors in the war and divide the world between...

Duration: 00:15:27


#71: If I Were Sent Back in Time to the Roman Empire, How Would I Take Over? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/22/2017
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This episode is fourth in our Alternate History Week series, where I look at famous books of alternate history and discuss why I think their alternate timelines aren't plausible. Lest Darkness Fall, written in 1939 by L. Sprague de Camp, is one of the classics of the alternate history genre. American archeologist Martin Padway gets sent back to Rome in 535 AD. He introduces new technology to the Italo-Ostrogothic kingdom, such as the telegraph, printing press, and brandy; wards off a...

Duration: 00:10:03


#70: A Vietnam POW’s Story of 6 Years in the Hanoi Hilton — Amy Shively Hawk - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/21/2017
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A single death is a tragedy; a million deaths is a statistic. -Joseph Stalin When consider major historical events that involved millions of people— World War 2, the Great Depression, the Cold War—it's easy to forget that real people with their own stories were part of those events. Today we're zeroing in on one story. And that's the story of James Shively, an Air Force Pilot who was shot down over North Vietnam in 1967 and spent six years in the infamous Hanoi Hilton POW camp. To talk with...

Duration: 01:06:19


#69: What if Byzantium Had Never Fallen? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/18/2017
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This episode is third in our Alternate History Week series, where I look at famous books of alternate history and discuss why I think their alternate timelines aren't plausible. Today's book is Harry Turtledove's wonderful book Agent of Byzantium. In this book, Turtledove imagines that the Prophet Muhammed, instead of developing Islam, converted to Christianity and became a celebrated prelate and saint. Without the Muslim conquests, the Eastern Roman Empire remained the pre-eminent power in...

Duration: 00:11:14


#68: What if China Had Discovered the New World? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/17/2017
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This episode is second in our Alternate History Week series, where I look at famous books of alternate history and discuss why I think their alternate timelines aren't plausible. Today's book is Kim Stanley Robinson's 2002 book The Years of Rice and Salt. It explores how world history would have developed if the Black Death had killed 99 percent of Europe's population, with the Islamic world, the Chinese, and American Indians filling in the void. One section discusses China discovering and...

Duration: 00:12:16


#67: Could One Marine Corps MEU Destroy the Entire Roman Army? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/16/2017
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This episode is the first of a five-part series in our Alternate History Week—our version of Shark Week, if you will. We are looking at famous books of alternate history, and I'm discussing why I think their alternate timelines aren't plausible. The first book in this series is 1632. Eric Flint's book imagines that a West Virginia town gets sent back to 1632 Germany, during the Thirty Years War, and gradually comes to dominate European politics of the age. I'm going to twist the premise of...

Duration: 00:10:22


#66: The Bronze Age Collapse of 1177 BC: The Most Catastrophic Event in History - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/15/2017
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There was an event in history worse than World War I, worse than the Mongol invasions that killed 40 million, worse than the little Ice Age that triggered famines and rebellions across the medieval world. This event was the "Dark Ages before the Dark Ages." It was the Bronze Age Collapse of 1177 BC, and it was so monumental that it inspired Homer’s ‘The Iliad’ TO HELP OUT THE SHOW Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one. Subscribe on iTunes...

Duration: 00:10:07


#65: How to Organize a Viking Raid — Lee Accomando - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/14/2017
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Everyone is fascinated with Vikings. If you are in Minnesota, then the team is practically your official religion. If you love opera then you can't help but think of a Wagnerian fat lady belting out tones and breaking crystal while adorned with a horned helmet. If you have any sort of cable package, you might be a fan of the Showtime series Vikings (my mother-in-law definitely is). In this episode I talk to Lee Accomando, host of the Viking Age Podcast, all about their history. He starts off...

Duration: 01:20:01


#64: Is There a Roman City in Present-Day China? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/11/2017
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Since the 1950s, many classicists and military historians have believed that an ancient Roman bloodline lives on in a Chinese village. The town of Liqian sits on the edge of the Gobi desert, and 4,500 miles from Rome. They have tried to prove that the ruddy-skinned, light-eyed, and fair-haired residents of Liqian are lost relatives of a missing Roman battalion of mercenaries that fought against the Chinese 2,000 years ago. Let's look into this theory and see if a piece of Rome still lives...

Duration: 00:08:25


#63: Why The Irish May Have Really Saved Civilization - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/10/2017
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Thomas Cahill argues in his best-selling book How the Irish Saved Civilization that Ireland played a critical role in Europe's evolution from the classical age of Rome to the medieval era. Is his narrative correct? Without Ireland, he argues, the transition could not have taken place. Not only did Irish monks and scribes maintain the very record of Western civilization -- copying manuscripts of Greek and Latin writers, both pagan and Christian, while libraries and learning on the continent...

Duration: 00:09:44


#62: Did Rome And China Know of Each Other? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/9/2017
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Rome and China were the two poles of the Silk Road. One sent precious porcelain, spices, and silks, the other sent out glassware and high-quality cloth. As Rome expanded into the Near East and China into Central Asia, did the two empires learn much of each other? Furthermore, did the two empires ever attempt direct contact? TO HELP OUT THE SHOW Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one. Subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher

Duration: 00:08:37


#61: Americana: The Brazilian City Where the Confederacy Lives On - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/8/2017
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The United States has accepted immigrants throughout its history, but America has its emigrants as well. Did you know there is a city in Brazil founded by Confederates who wanted to flee the U.S. during Reconstruction? Welcome to Americana, Brazil. TO HELP OUT THE SHOW Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one. Subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher

Duration: 00:07:42


#59: If the Moon Landings Weren’t Fake, Why Haven’t We Been Back? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/4/2017
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Conspiracy theorists have many "reasons" for why we've never been to the moon: the Van Allen radiation belts are too deadly, the challenges are too difficult, re-entry into the atmosphere is too hot. But Jason Funk, who asked today's question, points out that the cranks have at least one point—if we did go to the moon in 1960s, why haven't we been back after five decades of technological evolution? Good question. Let's dive in. TO HELP OUT THE SHOW Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your...

Duration: 00:09:17


#58: An Interview With Jerry Yellin, the 93-Year-Old Vet Who Flew WW2’s Last Combat Mission - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/3/2017
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I had the extraordinary pleasure to talk with Captain Jerry Yellin, a 93-year-old World War Two vet who flew the final combat mission in World War Two's Pacific Theatre. Yellin piloted for the 78th Fighter Squadron and was part of the 1945 bombing campaigns that ultimately triggered Japan's surrender. From April to August of 1945, Yellin and a small group of fellow fighter pilots flew dangerous bombing and strafe missions out of Iwo Jima over Japan. Even days after America dropped the...

Duration: 00:47:12


#57: What Were Rome’s Persian Borderlands Like? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/2/2017
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Being a Roman isn't easy. Running an intercontinental empire across hundreds of languages, customs, and ethnic groups without the benefit of telegraphs or steam power requires constant vigilance or the whole enterprise will fall apart. Let's look at the Roman borderland's with Persia to see what life was like on the periphery of the empire. TO HELP OUT THE SHOW Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one. Subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher

Duration: 00:06:08


#56: German POWs in the US During WW2 - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

8/1/2017
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Did you know that over 400,000 German POWs were settled in the United States during World War II? Did you know that they may have built some of the stone buildings that make up your town square? Or that they were responsible for bringing in America’s harvest in the fall of 1945 when most men were still off to war? Learn about this fascinating but understudied part of America’s history. TO HELP OUT THE SHOW Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read...

Duration: 00:11:11


#55: How Emperor Justinian Changed the World—Robin Pierson - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

7/31/2017
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Justinian I of Byzantium is among the most towering figure of the ancient and medieval periods. His innovations in governance, architecture, law, and welding together religion with imperial power were blueprints of governance for the next thousand years of kings and emperors. He rose to imperial power in 527 AD and reacquired Roman lands in Europe that were lost a century ago to Vandal and Ostrogothic invasions. He removed the rotting branches of his administration, replacing bureaucrats...

Duration: 00:56:08


#54: How Texas Almost Became German - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

7/28/2017
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Like much of the United States, Texas has a large popular whose ancestors originated in Germany. But Texas takes it a step further. In the 1840s a massive immigration of Germans arrived when the Adelsverein (The Society for the Protection of German Immigrants in Texas) organized at Biebrich on the Rhine near Mainz. It assisted thousands in coming to Central Texas and establishing such settlements as New Braunfels and Fredericksburg. So many arrived that Texas practically became an outpost...

Duration: 00:05:47


#53: Did America Switch from Tea to Coffee Due to the Boston Tea Party? - History Unplugged Podcast | American History, World History, World War 2, US Presidents, and the Civil War

7/27/2017
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In mid-December 1773 a force of colonists, dressed up as Mohawk Indians, boarded the three boats and dumped 342 chests of tea into the Boston Harbor. The protest later became known as the Boston Tea Party, but many historians (and coffee afficionados) believe it also sparked an anti-tea (read anti-British) sentiment in the colonies. John Adams wrote to Abigail on July 6, 1774 that "...I have drank Coffee every Afternoon since, and have borne it very well. Tea must be universally renounced....

Duration: 00:09:14

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