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Michigan Radio: Environment-logo

Michigan Radio: Environment

Michigan PR

Assorted stories from Michigan Radio.

Assorted stories from Michigan Radio.
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United States

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Michigan PR

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Assorted stories from Michigan Radio.

Language:

English


Episodes

You can thank (or scorn) this man for the birth of eugenics

2/15/2018
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This week marks the 196th birthday of someone who occupies a place of dishonor in the annals of science. Sir Francis Galton was born this week in 1822. He was interested in a wide range of fields: meteorology, psychology, and biometrics, but it was his social theory on eugenics that left an unsavory and unhappy mark on the world. University of Michigan medical historian and PBS contributor Dr. Howard Markel joined Stateside to talk about the origins of eugenics. He discussed the racial...

Duration:00:07:04

Hundreds race to catch "dinosaur of a fish"

2/13/2018
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This month, hundreds of spear fishers went to Black Lake in northern Michigan. They competed to catch just six lake sturgeon before the fishing season ended. Sturgeon are a state threatened species, and their harvest is tightly regulated.

Duration:00:03:59

Stateside 2.12.2018

2/12/2018
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Could a fungus from the bottom of the Great Lakes hold a cure for cancer? That answer comes today on Stateside . We also discuss why lawmakers are exploring the option to eliminate no-fault auto insurance.

Duration:00:49:59

Could a fungus from the bottom of the Great Lakes hold a cure for cancer?

2/12/2018
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Could a fungus from the bottom of the Great Lakes hold a cure for cancer? The final answer is still far in the distance, but a team of scientists believes there is promise in newly discovered Great Lakes fungi.

Duration:00:10:38

Oscoda residents wonder why state hasn't done more about PFAS foam

2/8/2018
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People who live in Oscoda are concerned about foam containing toxic chemicals known as per-and-polyfluoroalkyl substances – or PFAS – that keeps appearing on Van Etten Lake. The serene lake in Northeast Michigan is surrounded by trees and houses. But it also has foamy stuff that looks like soap scum floating along its shores. Residents are wondering why the state isn’t doing more about it.

Duration:00:03:59

A ship without a captain: Michigan working to bring autonomous vessels to Great Lakes

2/6/2018
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Autonomous vehicles are making their way towards the highways and streets of America, and between the automakers and the American Center for Mobility at Willow Run , Michigan is playing a big role in developing the technology for autonomous vehicles. Since Michigan is surrounded by the Great Lakes, what about autonomous vessels on the lakes?

Duration:00:11:39

Injection well proposal worries neighbors of Northern Michigan landfill

2/6/2018
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Near a landfill in northern Michigan, residents have been dealing with undrinkable water for decades. Now, a new proposal at the landfill makes them even more concerned. In 2005, Rita McNamara’s well broke and she needed a new one. McNamara says she was walking her property with a well driller when a woman from the county health department drove up.

Duration:00:03:59

Stateside 2.5.2018

2/5/2018
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Today on Stateside, we hear from a researcher who's found a link between the Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Genesee County and the switch to Flint River water. And, we talk about the crucial moment of Super Bowl LII when two former Wolverines mattered most.

Duration:00:49:20

Researchers say definitive link exists between most Legionnaires’ cases and switch to Flint River

2/5/2018
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Researchers have linked a Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Genesee County to a switch to the Flint River for drinking water. During the Legionnaires' disease outbreaks in 2014 and 2015, twelve people died and 79 people became sick.

Duration:00:10:03

Science for the People, a revived movement of radical scientists, to meet this week in Ann Arbor

2/1/2018
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The late 1960s saw the birth of many activist groups fighting to change the status quo, particularly in light of the ongoing Vietnam War and Civil Rights movement. Science for the People was one such group. It was made up of radical scientists who challenged the relationship between their work and political and economic power.

Duration:00:09:58

Insecticides showing up in Great Lakes rivers

2/1/2018
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Insecticides widely used on farms, lawns and gardens — known as neonicotinoids — are showing up in rivers across the Great Lakes region.

Duration:00:03:59

A guide for tomorrow morning's lunar trifecta, the super blue blood moon

1/30/2018
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Tomorrow morning there will be a lunar trifecta: the super blue blood moon. Mary Stewart Adams of the Headlands International Dark Sky Park in Emmett County joined Stateside today to explain what this rare lunar event is, what Michiganders will be able to see, and when.

Duration:00:05:01

Traverse City high schoolers convince their Congressman to join climate caucus

1/30/2018
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The climate solutions caucus in the U.S. House is a group of more than 60 Democrats and Republicans who want to address climate change. Representative Fred Upton from St. Joseph just joined the caucus . Last fall, Representative Jack Bergman, R-MI 1st District, announced he was joining the caucus. He represents northern Michigan. A group of Traverse City high schoolers were the unlikely lobbyists who helped convince Bergman to join the caucus.

Duration:00:03:59

Merlin vs plover: a hungry falcon and an endangered shorebird

1/25/2018
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Piping plovers are little white and gray shorebirds. You might’ve seen them running around on the beach. Sarah Saunders is a post-doctoral researcher at Michigan State University. “The majority of the piping plovers in the Great Lakes region nest at Sleeping Bear Dunes,” she says. “The chicks look like little fluffy cotton balls on toothpicks because their legs are really long and they’re very cute. And they make a very high pitched piping noise.”

Duration:00:03:59

Study: We can spread the flu virus into the air when we breathe

1/23/2018
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Health experts say we can catch the flu if someone coughs near us. But now there’s evidence we can spread the influenza virus into the air just by breathing.

Duration:00:04:00

Stateside 1.18.2018

1/18/2018
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Today on Stateside, we check in on the sentencing hearing for former sports doctor Larry Nassar, and a PFAS expert answers basic questions about the chemicals. Also today, an inventor explains how he turned satellite dishes into wind turbines that help irrigate crops and charge phones.

Duration:00:49:53

Meteorite hunters find several fragments on a frozen lake near Hamburg Township

1/18/2018
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After Michigan's meteor show Tuesday night , the hunt was on to find fragments. Larry Atkins and Robert Ward of the American Meteor Society flew here from Arizona in hopes of finding a piece, and today they were successful. They located several meteorites on a frozen lake near Hamburg, Michigan.

Duration:00:03:26

Am I at risk? How do you clean it up? A PFAS expert answers basic questions.

1/18/2018
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PFAS is an acronym for a group of industrial chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. They've been used since the '50s, in everything from firefighting foam to fast-food paper wrappers to stain-resistant textiles and carpeting, waterproof shoes and boots, non-stick pots and pans, and more.

Duration:00:11:36

Residents in Oscoda wonder why state didn't act on PFAS issues sooner

1/18/2018
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At least 14 communities in Michigan have water contaminated with a family of chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS . One of those sites, in West Michigan, has gotten a lot of attention recently. This month, the state abruptly announced a cleanup standard for PFAS. But these chemicals have been a pollution problem in the state for years. In Oscoda, some residents are wondering why remediation is taking so long.

Duration:00:03:59

Stateside 1.17.2018

1/17/2018
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Today on Stateside , a meteorite hunter explains just what caused that bright flash of light in Tuesday night's sky. And, we learn how Muskegon "snurfers" plowed the way for snowboarding's popularity. We also discuss whether a sandhill crane hunt is coming to Michigan soon, and we hear why Michigan Radio's sports commentator John U. Bacon calls MSU President Simon's appearance in court today little more than "political expediency."

Duration:00:49:43

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