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Micro Economics

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Location:

United States

Language:

English


Episodes

The Open Internet Order

6/29/2012
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This podcast discusses the Open Internet Access Order adopted by the FCC and debated by both Net neutrality advocates and Tea Party supporters.

Duration: 00:12:39


An Honest Policy Wonk

6/13/2012
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This podcast addresses regulatory capture, examining when the regulatory environment works in spite of it due to the presence of an honest policy wonk.

Duration: 00:16:35


Steve Jobs and the Economics of One Entrepreneur

3/2/2012
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This podcast explores Steve Jobs' entrepreneurship and impact, covering various successes and setbacks over his career.

Duration: 00:18:17


Direction of Broadband Spillover

2/3/2012
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This podcast explores how growth in broadband usage has positively spilled into other online markets, creating growth spillovers. It explores the geographic direction of those growth spillovers from broadband to online retailers and advertising-supported media to determine to whom and to where the positive gains flowed.

Digital Dark Matter

11/17/2011
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Shane Greenstein explores instances of "digital dark matter," or important building blocks of the digital economy that contribute value and new functionality, but which are nonpecuniary and so aren't measured directly or recorded in GDP.

Building Broadband Ahead of Digital Demand

10/28/2011
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Many governments today, especially outside the US, are considering making large subsidies for broadband.

Gatekeeping Economics

9/14/2011
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It has become fashionable among Internet and Web watchers to notice threats on the horizon to the open Web. Economics tends not to take such an alarmist approach to the future of the Web, viewing it with more equanimity or acquiescence, depending on your perspective.

Digitization and Value Creation

8/17/2011
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Often, the simplest economic questions are the hardest to answer. Consider this: How much economic value did the massive decline in the cost of digitization in the last two decades create?

Standardization and Coordination

7/15/2011
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Modern computing markets need standards to function. In this podcast, Shane Greenstein counts five distinct ways public standards coordinate market behavior.

Bleeding-Edge Mass Market Standards

6/14/2011
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To have a large impact, bleeding-edge mass market standards must do two things: diffuse widely and provide new functionality. In this podcast, Shane Greenstein discusses the determination of new standards in mass markets, an event that shapes such paradoxical outcomes and hence market structure and firm strategy.

The Next Chapter at Google

5/24/2011
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After its first dozen years, Google possesses some economic similarities to Microsoft at age 15, as well as a few key differences.

Network of Platforms

4/19/2011
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The Internet has been called a "network of networks." Although the phrase once had meaning, it is misleading today. It does not reflect how commercial behavior has shaped the Internet's evolution.

Does Google Have Too Much Money?

3/10/2011
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For some time the blogosphere has made a ruckus over Google's growing power in the commercial Web. Such concerns probably would have arisen even if the world's developed economies were not in the midst of a painful macroeconomic nadir. In such dismal conditions, however, this extraordinary young firm's wealth makes it a natural target for envy and scrutiny. Is it a problem when a fabulously wealthy firm uses its money to explore grand new projects? If there is an economic problem, it is...

Soccer Mom Messaging Is the Poetry of Our Age

10/18/2010
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Ubiquitous and inexpensive information technology supports the poetry of our age. It's being written every moment of every day by teenagers, soccer moms, and professionals. The results are mostly farce, occasionally tragic, and rarely private.

Revolution in Spectrum Allocation

10/18/2010
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A revolution has largely gone unnoticed. Since 1994, the US has assigned spectrum for mobile telephony through auctions instead of the traditional regulatory mechanisms. The transition from analog to digital television has freed up additional spectrum, giving the FCC the opportunity to set up an auction in the 700-MHz range. That spectrum auction ended in March 2008. The spectrum went into use in June 2009, after analog television retires.