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The Economist: All Audio

The Economist

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.
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London, United Kingdom

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The Economist

Description:

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

Language:

English


Episodes

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the November 18th 2017 edition

11/20/2017
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This week: the sudden end of an era in Zimbabwe, trouble in the American marijuana industry and the sound of silence in the frozen Baltic

Duration: 00:13:29


The week ahead: Mugabe’s downfall

11/17/2017
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We assess the future for Zimbabwe following the removal of President Robert Mugabe. Also, will Alabama send a Democrat to the US Senate? And Chile’s disgruntled voters head to the polls to elect a new President. Robert Guest hosts

Duration: 00:16:45


The Economist asks: How has Donald Trump impacted America's cities?

11/16/2017
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In this special episode, Anne McElvoy travels to Chicago and New York to get a sense of how each city’s power players are responding to the presidency. She talks to Rahm Emanuel, Chicago's mayor, about dealing with the city’s problems while at odds with the president. And former deputy mayor of New York, Kenneth Lipper, takes Anne to a secret tunnel to show why Mr Trump's infrastructure plans for cities won't work. And would Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner be welcomed back to the Big Apple?

Duration: 00:30:43


Babbage: Negative emissions

11/15/2017
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Countries around the world have agreed to cut carbon emissions but what are they doing to remove the existing CO2 from the air? And how a new generation of surgical robots is about to enter the operating theatre. Also, why do birds really have such colourful bodies? Jason Palmer hosts.

Duration: 00:19:22


Money talks: Can you say CPTPP?

11/14/2017
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Only three days into his term, President Trump withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership. But now, the remaining 11 countries have formed a new trade deal called the CPTPP. Host Philip Coggan and Soumaya Keynes speculate whether China might join, now that America is out. Plus why there’s geopolitical tension in the oil market. And Michael Lewis talks about his new book.

Duration: 00:19:24


Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the November 11th 2017 edition

11/13/2017
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This week: our Washington correspondents go head-to-head to find out who knows more about the first year of the Trump presidency; how crapsules might just save your life; and the consolations of philosophy for the middle-aged

Duration: 00:13:19


The week ahead: The Trump test

11/10/2017
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One year after President Trump was elected, we quiz our correspondents' knowledge about his time in office. What is the connection between Larry Flynt and Mr. Trump? And what was behind that pained expression in Sean Spicer's eyes? We answer all those pressing questions and more

Duration: 00:29:55


The Economist asks: How has President Trump changed Washington?

11/9/2017
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In this special episode, Anne McElvoy returns to America's capital one year-on from the election to find out how party politics has been transformed by Donald Trump's presidency. She checks in with his biographer Marc Fisher, who says he was thrown into a system "he didn't bother to study". And she attends a keynote delivered by a reflective Bill Clinton. Also on the show, is Russia the worm in the bud for Mr Trump? And the Democrats make their first comeback in local elections.

Duration: 00:32:42


Babbage: Leapfrogging forward

11/8/2017
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Technology in Africa is making huge advances but will it enough to close the economic gap between Africa and the West? Plus, how scientists are trying to harness the microbiome to rid us of tooth rot. And scientists have developed a 'spaghetti' probe that can map our brains much more accurately. We ask what the future of this technology is. Jason Palmer hosts.

Duration: 00:14:57


Money talks: ICO Bubble with benefits

11/7/2017
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Our Technology Editor, Ludwig Siegele, says that despite the froth, Initial Coin Offerings could challenge the dominance of the tech giants. Also, will Venezuela finally default on its debt and how are markets reacting to the arrest of the Saudi Warren Buffet? Simon Long hosts.

Duration: 00:17:11


Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the November 4th 2017 edition

11/6/2017
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This week: Richard Dawkins on the only source of absolute truth; the croissant crisis in France; and a tribute to Fats Domino, the real king of rock ’n’ roll

Duration: 00:10:58


The week ahead: Do social media threaten democracy?

11/3/2017
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As the US Senate hears evidence on the spread of Russian misinformation online, we ask if social media are undermining democracy. Plus, how the Weinstein storm is ripping through Westminster. And could America's good cop, bad cop routine ease tensions with North Korea? Helen Joyce hosts.

Duration: 00:19:38


The Economist asks: Richard Dawkins

11/2/2017
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Anne McElvoy and Jan Piotrowski ask one of the world's best-known evolutionary biologists whether science can guide us through a turbulent world of post-truth. Can there really be an objective truth, or will our existing biases win out?

Duration: 00:20:33


Babbage: Unidentified flying rock

11/1/2017
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The first interstellar visitor to the solar system arrives, turns and leaves. What can be learned from the mysterious object? Also, researchers are kitting out drones to deliver supplies to the battlefield. And if wireless charging takes off, electric vehicles could—in theory—run forever

Duration: 00:15:37


Money talks: A healthy deal?

10/31/2017
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Is Amazon’s rumoured entry into the pharma market the real impetus behind the CVS Health and Aetna deal? And Barry Eichengreen, Economist from the University of California, questions how long the dollar can stay dominant. Also, how is France coping with a butter shortage? Simon Long hosts.

Duration: 00:14:09


Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the October 28th 2017 edition

10/30/2017
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This week: Armando Iannucci on the farce in the White House; the bad side of driving in Myanmar; and a cultural history of hauntings for Halloween

Duration: 00:12:54


The week ahead: Separatism and sensibility

10/27/2017
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As Catalonia’s regional government declares independence, we explore the next stage of the unfolding crisis in Spain. Russia's president Vladimir Putin has established himself as the country's latest Tsar. A trip to Mexico reveals how Donald Trump is reversing the historical partnership of Mexico and the United States. And we take stock of the Balfour Declaration a hundred years on

Duration: 00:24:18


The Economist asks: Armando Iannucci

10/26/2017
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The creator of the hit satire shows "Veep" and "The Thick of It" explains how to laugh at a mass-murdering former dictator, how Russia is receiving his latest film "The Death of Stalin", and whether President Trump really has killed satire

Duration: 00:19:39


Babbage: All about that base

10/25/2017
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Minutes ago, Nature announced an important development in gene editing. Host Hal Hodson and Natasha Loder discuss how this technique is so precise and what this means for curing genetic diseases. Plus, why sperm whales like heavy metal music. And why are we so negative about our future?

Duration: 00:19:00


Money talks: Wait and See MPC

10/24/2017
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Callum Williams, our Britain economics correspondent, argues that the Bank of England should raise interest rates early next year rather than next week. Nobel Economist Jean Tirole shares his worries about competition in the digital economy. And driving from right to left in Myanmar. Philip Coggan hosts.

Duration: 00:16:49

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