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The Feast

Podglomerate

The Feast presents delectable stories from the dining tables of history. Every two weeks, we immerse you in the sights, sounds, & tastes of a meal from the past. Make bread with medieval monks; share a martini with Churchill. Find out what wars were won & which kingdoms were lost, all for the sake of a good meal. Email suggestions for shows to thefeast@thefeastpodcast.org

The Feast presents delectable stories from the dining tables of history. Every two weeks, we immerse you in the sights, sounds, & tastes of a meal from the past. Make bread with medieval monks; share a martini with Churchill. Find out what wars were won & which kingdoms were lost, all for the sake of a good meal. Email suggestions for shows to thefeast@thefeastpodcast.org
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Location:

United States

Networks:

Podglomerate

Description:

The Feast presents delectable stories from the dining tables of history. Every two weeks, we immerse you in the sights, sounds, & tastes of a meal from the past. Make bread with medieval monks; share a martini with Churchill. Find out what wars were won & which kingdoms were lost, all for the sake of a good meal. Email suggestions for shows to thefeast@thefeastpodcast.org

Language:

English


Episodes

Cantonese Canada: Supermarkets, Street Food, & Special Ingredients

2/9/2018
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As the Year of the Dog approaches, join us for noodle rolls and year cake in the city of Markham, Ontario- home to some of the best Cantonese restaurants and Asian supermarkets outside China! We talk to Teresa Zhang, whose family hails from Guangzhou, as we feast on Cantonese specialties and go hunting for geoduck and yellow chives at a nearby Asian grocery store. And what do chives have to do with the Great Chinese Garlic Dump of 2001 anyway? And what on earth is a garlic dump? All this and...

Duration:00:27:08

Musketeers & Mousselines: Alexander Dumas' Massive Dictionary of Food

1/26/2018
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Alexander Dumas was among the most beloved writers of the 19th century, responsible for classics like The Three Musketeers & The Count of Monte Cristo. But did you know Dumas longest work was devoted entirely to his other passion? Food! Written at the end of his life, Dumas' Le Grand Dictionnaire de Cuisine, published posthumously in 1873, is part cookbook, part memoire, and 100% unique. From celery-based hangover recipes to 200 lb. sturgeon centrepieces, Dumas' book is a portrait of...

Duration:00:29:25

A Case for Kale: Vegetarianism in Victorian England

1/12/2018
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With 2018 finally here, it's resolution time! Over 1/3 of Americans have resolved to eat healthier this year and, for many, that means adopting a more plant-forward diet. From buffalo fried cauliflower to tempeh fish and chips, it's clear that vegetarian and vegan diets are on the rise. But a meat-free lifestyle is no passing fad. From the ancient Greek Pythagoras to George Bernard Shaw, the rise of the vegetarian movement has been thousands of years in the making. But who were some of...

Duration:00:29:49

Hard Nog and Hardy Oranges: A History of Virginian Cocktails with Micah LeMon

12/15/2017
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Join us for a special holiday episode where we investigate the rich mixed drink history of Virginia with Micah LeMon, bartender and author of The Imbible, A Cocktail Guide for Beginning & Home Bartenders. What did Virginia citrus have to do with the birth of the California orange industry? And can we really trace an eggnog recipe back to George Washington's Mt. Vernon? We'll bust some cocktail myths while exploring the contributions Virginia has made to the mixed drink industry over the...

Duration:00:30:37

The Gods Must Be Hungry: Divine Food Stories from Eaten Magazine

12/8/2017
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From medieval butter towers to prehistoric bee-keepers, this week we're examining the divine associations with global foods with Emelyn Rude, editor of the new food history magazine Eaten. Join us as she gives us a sneak peak of "The Food of the Gods", the first volume of the magazine, available now! We'll learn how mortals and immortals have been making, sharing, and fighting over food since the birth of humanity itself. Learn what foods can keep the gods on your side, from ancient Roman...

Duration:00:29:22

Unsimply Soba: Comics & Competition in Japanese History

11/24/2017
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Think you can eat 50 bowls of noodles? What about 100? This week, The Feast explores the tradition of wanko soba from Iwate, Japan, where families and friends compete to see who can slurp the most noodles in a single sitting. But what makes soba, or buckwheat, the preferred noodle for this centuries-old food contest? We'll dig into the celebrated history of food competitions in pre-modern Japan where writers depicted epic battles waged amongst favorite foods. Forget tiger versus shark;...

Duration:00:29:15

Passionate Pavlovas: National Desserts from A to Z

11/10/2017
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From the Caesar salad to Fettucini Alfredo, we're surrounded by dishes named for famous figures in history. But how many can claim to be the national dessert of not one, but two countries? This week, we're taking a look at the origins and history of the Pavlova, named for one of the world's first ballerina superstars. Famous for making the Russian ballet popular on the international stage, Anna Pavlova inspired devoted fans from Argentina to India to Japan. But how did her name end up...

Duration:00:29:18

Supernatural Suppers: An Icelandic Ghost Story

10/27/2017
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Dead chefs tell no tales! Except on Halloween, that is. This week, we're bringing you the story of a ghostly banquet straight from the sagas of medieval Iceland. A mix of fact and fiction, sagas provide some of the only clues we have about early Icelandic cooking. Today, the island's cuisine may be famous for its fermented shark and its luscious skyr, but we'll learn what was on the menu 1,000 years ago when a dead woman decided to play chef for the night. Find out what happens when you...

Duration:00:28:11

Complicating Kosher: How the Trefa Banquet Changed American Judaism

10/13/2017
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This week we’re discovering the meal that changed the face of American Judaism. Featuring Dr. Jonathan Sarna of Brandeis University, we’ll learn how a lavish banquet in 1883 Cincinnati kicked off a fierce debate about what it means to keep kosher. How did a dish of frogs’ legs bring about one of the largest religious arguments the US has ever seen? We’ll explore how a dispute over regional Jewish foodways changed the face of the religion at the end of the 19th century- from a dream of a...

Duration:00:32:06

From Washington Street to Atlantic Avenue: Food Stories from New York's Little Syria

9/29/2017
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Join us as we discover the rich culinary history of Syrian communities in New York City. Beginning in the 1880s, Syrian immigrants settled in lower Manhattan, setting up food shops, restaurants, and grocery stores. We'll taste fermented milk at Arta's Restaurant, reviewed by the New York Times in 1899. We'll listen to opera at Kalil's, a Syrian-owned restaurant which boasted seating for 1,000 at a time! We'll speak to Linda K. Jacobs, a descendant of New York's Syrian Colony and author of...

Duration:00:41:23

Fuelling the Presidency: African American Cooks in the White House

9/15/2017
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Zephyr Wright (left) & Laura Dollie Johnson (right) This week, we're exploring the unsung history of African American cooks in the White House with soul food scholar, Adrian E. Miller, author of "The President's Kitchen Cabinet: The Story of the African Americans Who Have Fed Our First Families, from the Washingtons to the Obamas". Join us as we uncover the history of two formidable women who put their stamp on American history through their cooking. We'll look at the life of Laura Dollie...

Duration:00:37:52