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The Macmillan Brown Lectures (RNZ)

RNZ New Zealand

Exploring a wide range of subjects about New Zealand and Pacific history and culture, the MacMillan Brown Lecture series has been an institution at the University of Canterbury since 1941.

Exploring a wide range of subjects about New Zealand and Pacific history and culture, the MacMillan Brown Lecture series has been an institution at the University of Canterbury since 1941.
More Information

Location:

Christchurch, New Zealand

Description:

Exploring a wide range of subjects about New Zealand and Pacific history and culture, the MacMillan Brown Lecture series has been an institution at the University of Canterbury since 1941.

Language:

English

Contact:

Radio New Zealand House 155 The Terrace P O Box 123 Wellington 04 474 1999


Episodes

Macmillan Brown Lecture 2012

1/20/2013
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After a break of two years, this long-running lecture series resumes with an address by Sitiveni Rabuka and an introduction by the Rt Hon Murray McCully. They discuss democracy in the South Pacific with particular focus on recent history in Fiji. Recorded at the University of Canterbury in October 2012.

Macmillan Brown lecture 3, 2010

1/1/2010
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Indigenous heritage and museums today Encyclopaedic museums were institutions born of 'Enlightenment' values and committed to a belief that through the study of things from all over the world, truth would emerge. Museums were also thought to broaden cultural horizons and foster a greater understanding of cultural diversity. For the last quarter-century however, these principles have been called into question. Roger Fyfe examines how increased ethnic and cultural self-assertion has attacked...

Duration: 00:46:46


Macmillan Brown lecture 2, 2010

1/1/2010
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Museums in the Colonies The great natural history and encyclopaedic museums of Europe arose as colonial empires were expanding round the globe. Efforts to organise, classify and display the material culture of distant peoples can be seen as a cultural echo of the era's political imperialism. So what happened when newly arrived colonial communities in the so called 'source countries' (eg North America, Australia, New Zealand) set about establishing their own museums? Were the inspired...

Duration: 00:51:29


Macmillan Brown lecture 1, 2010

1/1/2010
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Temples to Science: Museums continue to be a burgeoning worldwide phenomenon. They come in a myriad of sizes and guises. Today it seems no community is complete without one or more! But how many of those amongst us who flock to museums in every increasing numbers, both at home and abroad, stop to ask ourselves 'where did this peculiar notion called a museum come from'? Roger Fyfe traces the genesis of the modern museum to some profoundly eighteenth century intellectual vision and values.

Duration: 00:47:10


MacMillan Brown lecture 3, 2009

1/1/2009
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The 2009 Macmillan Brown lectures explore how Maori culture operates as a force for New Zealand's social and scientific advancement. In this third lecture, Professor Michael Walker argues that increasing Maori participation in science could expand its intellectual scope and strengthen its practice.

Duration: 00:27:14


MacMillan Brown lecture 2, 2009

1/1/2009
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The 2009 Macmillan Brown lectures explore how Maori culture operates as a force for New Zealand's social and scientific advancement. In this second lecture, Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith looks at how DNA technology can help integrate indigenous and scientific knowledge. She's introduced by Professor Karen Nero from the University of Canterbury's Macmillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies.

Duration: 00:48:49


MacMillan Brown lecture 1, 2009

1/1/2009
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The 2009 Macmillan Brown lectures explore how Maori culture operates as a force for New Zealand's social and scientific advancement. In this first lecture, Professor Te Ahukaramu Charles Royal discusses the theme of creative potential in Maoridom. He's introduced by Professor Angus MacFarlane.

Duration: 00:47:46


Macmillan Brown lecture 3, 2008

1/1/2008
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Cookbooks and Cultural Identity in the 20th Century. In this final Macmillan Brown lecture for 2008, Prof Helen Leach of the University of Otago exposes the way in which cultural identity can be gauged from looking at community cookbooks published here through the decades. Pakeha regarded Maori cookery as a relic of the past until cookbooks published in the Maori Renaissance during the 1970s showed its resistance to extinction. In the structure of their meals, descendants of British...

Duration: 00:49:17


Macmillan Brown lecture 2, 2008

1/1/2008
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Cookery in the Colonial Era. Contact with the immigrants brought new types of kai and ways of cooking to Maori, explored by Prof Helen Leach of the University of Otago in the second of her 2008 Macmillan Brown lectures. From the range of introduced crops and animals, Maori selected those which slotted easily into their culinary tradition as substitutes for traditional foods. In contrast Pakeha settlers faced food shortages and a temporary loss of cooking technology. After a period of...

Duration: 00:47:10


Macmillan Brown lecture 1, 2008

1/1/2008
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Maori Cookery Before Cook. What impact did migration from a tropical homeland have on Maori cookery? They experienced drastic changes in their traditional foods, yet the rules that were part of their Polynesian culinary tradition remained intact. In the first of her 2008 Macmillan Brown lectures, Prof Helen Leach of the University of Otago argues that culinary traditions are important for the survival and the maintenance of our identities. Leach draws a distinction between culinary...

Duration: 00:46:52


Macmillan Brown lecture 3, 2007

1/1/2007
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A Tale of Two Mats: technology and transformation. The ways in which new technologies are transforming the worldviews and lifestyles of Pacific societies. Pacific societies were changed early, and fundamentally, by a number of bureaucratic and production technologies but these were appropriated and controlled by leaders in Pacific societies. The impact of new technologies which are increasingly available and ever cheaper, are not as easily resisted or controlled. The lecture considered...

Duration: 00:52:35


Macmillan Brown lecture 1, 2007

1/1/2007
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The Globalisation of the Village. The consequences of the recent movements of people on the organisation of Pacific societies. Pacific societies were once considered somewhat remote and isolated: relatively few people came and went and the societies remained relatively untouched. Incoming people were embraced and incorporated. But the increasing volume and character of movement has rapidly changed that. Escalating emigration, immigration and constant movement links societies such as Samoa...

Duration: 00:54:47


Macmillan Brown lecture 3, 2006

1/1/2006
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A broader context: Pacific art in global terms. The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa has a significant advocacy role to play in speaking for and about the art of New Zealand's Polynesian peoples. Cultural diplomacy underpins the push to present the best of our art traditions to new audiences in European countries where, ironically, the idea of the art of the stereotypical Pacific "other" was first constructed. New Zealand's art culture, in global terms, may be tiny but there is a...

Macmillan Brown lecture 2, 2006

1/1/2006
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A tuakana-teina relationship: contemporary Maori and Pacific Art. Contemporary Pacific art has tended to be defined as art by New Zealand residents or New Zealanders of Pacific Islands, mainly Polynesian, origin or descent. But New Zealand is part of the Polynesian Triangle, Maori are Polynesians, and many Pakeha and Palangi identify strongly with their country's geographic location and the cultures indigenous to the region, and their art reflects this. The older sibling/younger sibling...

Duration: 00:38:51


Macmillan Brown lecture 1, 2006

1/1/2006
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Island culture and urban life: the span of contemporary Pacific art. "As it happens, I am not an expert in contemporary Pacific art, but I have played a role in supporting and promoting it." In this lecture Jonathan Mane-Wheoki considers the rise of Pacific art from the tentative entry of pioneer Pacific painters such as Paul Tangata and Teuane Tibbo into the mainstream of New Zealand art in the 'sixties to the advent of the "big three" - Fatu Feu'u, Michel Tuffery and John Pule, the first...

Duration: 00:45:37


Macmillan Brown lecture 3, 2005

1/1/2005
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'A whirlpool of impure vocalisation': attitudes to New Zealand English. When the New Zealand accent was first noticed it was roundly condemned. Critics said it was the product of poor homes and laziness. It was seen as a wretched Cockney import from the slums of London. In this lecture Elizabeth Gordon will examine the early attitudes to New Zealand English and the view of language which gave rise to them. She will discuss the roles of standard and non-standard English in New Zealand and...

Duration: 00:53:21


Macmillan Brown lecture 2, 2005

1/1/2005
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'Afghans' and 'cheerios', 'kiwi' and 'iwi': the words we use. The beginnings of New Zealand English go back to the time when Captain Cook borrowed Maori words into English. In this lecture Elizabeth Gordon will discuss the processes whereby the English language was adapted to New Zealand conditions. She will consider the borrowing of Maori words into English in the period up to 1860 and the period after 1970 and discuss the question of Maori code-switching in English writing today. Some...

Duration: 00:54:35


Macmillan Brown lecture 1, 2005

1/1/2005
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The New Zealand accent was first noticed around 1900 when it was called a 'colonial twang'. Recordings of old New Zealanders collected in the 1940's by the New Zealand National Broadcasting Service have enabled researchers at the University of Canterbury to study the speech of men and women who were among the first English speaking children born in New Zealand. This work has shown that the accent was formed between 1850 and 1880. In this lecture Elizabeth Gordon will consider some of the...

Duration: 00:52:18