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World of Possibilities

WFMT Radio Network

A World of Possibilities is an award-winning one hour weekly radio program that penetrates behind the headlines to uncover the deeper meanings of events. It offers in-depth analysis, informed commentary and an exploration of new approaches to our most challenging problems. Our aim is to open minds and inspire new possibilities.

A World of Possibilities is an award-winning one hour weekly radio program that penetrates behind the headlines to uncover the deeper meanings of events. It offers in-depth analysis, informed commentary and an exploration of new approaches to our most challenging problems. Our aim is to open minds and inspire new possibilities.
More Information

Location:

Chicago, IL

Description:

A World of Possibilities is an award-winning one hour weekly radio program that penetrates behind the headlines to uncover the deeper meanings of events. It offers in-depth analysis, informed commentary and an exploration of new approaches to our most challenging problems. Our aim is to open minds and inspire new possibilities.

Language:

English

Contact:

Mainstream Media Project 854 9th Street, Suite B Arcata, CA 95521 (707) 826-9111


Episodes

Bombs Away

8/11/2009
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The cold war's been over for nearly twenty years, but the U.S. and Russia still aim thousands of nuclear tipped missiles at each other, ready to fire at a moments notice. Meanwhile, economies collapse, the climate cooks, militants terrorize, and none of these threats can be deterred by nuclear bombs. So why do we keep maintaining them, and at what cost?

Bad Medicine: Overusing Antibiotics in Meat Production

7/28/2009
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What part do we consumers play in driving the priorities of an industrial meat production system that puts cheap meat on our plates, but at rising costs to human health, animal welfare, and environmental integrity? Farmers have turned to feeding antibiotics to their animals to prevent outbreaks, but are they unwittingly selecting for the most virulent superbugs, while putting humans at risk?

Wasting Away

7/21/2009
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On both land and sea, human activities are inflicting damage on a scale that may well be irreversible. Our future is imperiled by the heedless pursuit of energy and development to feed a civilization that has still to learn to conserve as well as consume. Two winners of the prestigious TED Prize examine our impacts and urge us to embrace a conservation ethic to return vitality and diversity.

Game-Changing Innovation

7/7/2009
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The U.S. designs nifty iPhones and deadly weapons, but in measures that really matter, like education and green tech, we're being upstaged by other nations. In recent years, we have been systematically dis-investing in our collective capacity for innovation. Why is the engine of American ingenuity running off the rails, and what needs to be done to get us back on track?

Of Pigs and People

6/23/2009
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The indiscriminate use of antimicrobials in large-scale industrial meat production is building bacterial resistance to the most effective antibiotics on which our national and global health systems depend. Recorded largely on location on Midwestern hog and poultry farms, this program features interviews with farmers and others who are raising hogs by healthier and more humane ways.

Crowd-Sourcing Innovation

6/2/2009
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There have always been brilliant innovators working outside established institutions. With the emergence of open systems of innovation made possible by the Internet, now a far wider range of individuals, teams and institutions can participate in the problem-solving process. Not only for technical challenges, but for those thorny social problems which have eluded the best minds of our time.

The Miner's Canary: First Peoples' on Climate Change

5/26/2009
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Indigenous peoples, living closest to nature, feel the threat of climate change first. They have a potent message to deliver to the climate treaty negotiators meeting in Copenhagen in December 2009. The climate is changing the way they've lived forever, so they're adapting in order to endure. Do the rest of us have the wisdom and ingenuity to change along with the changing climate?

Sick and Tired: The Movement for Paid Sick Days

5/12/2009
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The first advice given in response to any health emergency such as SARS, swine flu, etc., is to stay home if you feel yourself getting sick. But half of all working Americans can't afford to miss work. Most work in low wage jobs where close interaction with others is constant and unavoidable. 127 countries provide at least a week of paid sick days a year - but not the United States.

Open Source Science

5/5/2009
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The outbreak of potential pandemics has driven home the urgent need for more rapid responses to public health threats. In order to respond more effectively, we need to create a more open system for the exchange of vital health information. Medical and scientific research pioneers are laying the foundation for a global health commons to accelerate the pace and effectiveness of crucial discoveries.

Peace, Justice - or Both

4/21/2009
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Peace or Justice? That question takes on an anguished poignancy these days in war ravaged societies from Bosnia to Sierra Leone. Peace negotiators and human rights advocates struggle to end the bloodshed and obtain justice for the victims. How does this work in societies whose weak and often corrupt legal structures have been decimated by war?

Building an Innovation Ecosystem

4/7/2009
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Everywhere we look our systems are collapsing in terminal dysfunction. It's forcing us to reinvent the way we do just about everything. But the infrastructure in place to catalyze the kinds of breakthrough innovation we need is still haphazard and inefficient. What kinds of institutions and incentives need to be put in place to spur the innovations we most need to be more efficient and effective?

Putting Our Heads Together

3/31/2009
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The open source movement launched over the past few decades by computer programmers has morphed into a parallel "open innovation" movement. The emergence of cross-sectoral "distributed intelligence" points to the promise of broader and more inclusive networks as the brightest future for the kind of innovation that will be necessary to address our most urgent challenges.

Reviving the Forgotten Continent

3/17/2009
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To many Americans, Africa is a continent of universal, unmitigated suffering, plagued by disease, famine, misgovernance, poverty, and war. While there are more than enough such tragedies on the continent, those who know it well say there's an energy and resilience among Africans that enables them to make much of what little good fortune comes their way. Africa sits on some of the world's most precious mineral wealth. But foreign nations have historically plundered for their own benefit and...

Who's This Economy For?

3/3/2009
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As our savings plummet and our debts soar, many of us are starting to wonder not only when we'll get back on track, but whether the track we've been on all these years is the right one to follow. Author, economist and former labor secretary Robert Reich asserts that rather than resuscitate an unjust and unsustainable economy, we should reinvent it to meet a wider range of needs and possibilities.

Impunity and Accountability in Colombia

2/24/2009
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For more than 40 years, Colombia has been caught in the cross fire of "La Violencia": thousands dead, millions more driven from their homes. Impunity remains the law of the land. Now a series of tribunals and truth commissions are seeking to discover what really happened; to give victims a chance to express their anger and sorrow and perpetrators a chance to confess and serve time or be amnestied.

Fostering Ingenuity

2/10/2009
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If necessity is the mother of invention, there's certainly plenty of necessity to go around these days. But are we doing all we can to incubate the innovations we most urgently need? We'll learn about how to harness our collective genius to address our most urgent needs, and about new threats that could derail our best efforts.

Pan America's Promise

1/27/2009
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Over the decades, U.S. policies towards Latin America have lurched between intervention and apparent indifference, demonstrating its dominance while leaving a residue of resentment. Now, on both sides of the border, new hope emerges for an era of warmer relations. What have been the impacts of U.S. policy, and how are they likely to change in an era of renewed hope but severe economic distress?

Growing the Green Collar Economy

1/20/2009
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In hard times most of us are grateful for any job, but as we face increasing unemployment, poverty, and climate change, the Obama administration proposes to put thousands of Americans to work insulating homes and public buildings, installing solar panels, and reclaiming industrial wastelands. Majora Carter and Van Jones have helped place green collar jobs near the top of the national agenda.

Failing Our Way to Success

1/6/2009
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At a moment when most all the systems that govern our lives have lost their grip on reality, we're forced to rethink and reinvent the way we do just about everything. Crucial to that transformation is learning how to innovate faster and better than ever before. In this weeks show, two leading students of innovation consider the pivotal role that experimentation plays in achieving eventual success.

Share Values or Shared Values: Re Thinking our Priorities

12/23/2008
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Hard economic times aren't good for much, but they do get us thinking. As we sort through the wreckage of our private dreams, we ask ourselves how we could have done it differently - and how, given the chance, we might create an economy more equitable and reliable than the last one.