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Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
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Location:

Dallas, TX

Description:

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Language:

English

Contact:

3000 Harry Hines Boulevard Dallas, Texas 75201 800-933-5372


Episodes

Is The First Alzheimer’s Survivor Living Among Us?

8/20/2018
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For decades, scientists have believed that the nervous system and the immune system operated independent of one another – the former running the body and the second protecting it. University of Virginia neuroscientist Jonathan Kipnis joins guest host John McCaa to talk about how researchers are learning that these two systems actually work more closely together than previously thought. His story “The Seventh Sense” appears in the August issue of Scientific American magazine.

Duration:00:48:54

A Line Divides: 100 Days Since Zero Tolerance

8/17/2018
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In a special program, “A Line Divides: 100 Days Since Zero Tolerance,” KERA’s Think and The California Report team up to examine the Trump Administration’s “zero tolerance” policy, the crackdown on immigration, and the separation of families who attempted to cross the border. We’ll hear about a large tent encampment in Tornillo, Texas created to house kids who had been separated from their parents and the national outcry that separation evoked. Think host Krys Boyd and The California Report...

Duration:00:49:18

Does Democracy Still Work? Americans Weigh In

8/16/2018
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Democracy is government by the people. So how do the people feel about the state of our democracy? That’s the question researchers with the Bush Institute and Penn Biden Center explored in a recent poll. Lindsay Lloyd, deputy director of human rights at the Bush Institute, joins us to talk about how Americans still highly value democracy but worry that U.S. democracy is weakening.

Duration:00:48:40

This Indian American Life

8/16/2018
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Neel Patel grew up the son of Indian immigrants, with one foot in America and one planted firmly in the old country. He joins us to talk about how that experience informs his debut collection of short stories – and about the lack of Indian characters in popular fiction. Patel’s collection is called “If You See Me, Don’t Say Hi” (Flatiron Books).

Duration:00:48:41

Does Democracy Still Work? Americans Weigh In

8/16/2018
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Democracy is government by the people. So how do the people feel about the state of our democracy? That’s the question researchers with the Bush Institute and Penn Biden Center explored in a recent poll. Lindsay Lloyd, deputy director of human rights at the Bush Institute, joins us to talk about how Americans still highly value democracy but worry that U.S. democracy is weakening.

Duration:00:48:38

Why Screens And Books Require Different Reading Skills

8/15/2018
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Learning to read is a process that builds cognitive skills in children. So what happens when those skills are developed through digital reading instead of books? UCLA child development expert Maryanne Wolf joins us to talk about how reading digitally affects children and adults alike, which she writes about in “Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World” (Harper).

Duration:00:48:40

How To Talk To Someone Who’s Wrong

8/15/2018
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Having a conversation with people on the other side of the political spectrum can feel like a waste of time. And so we wall ourselves in through our friend groups and social media feeds. Justin Lee joins us to talk about strategies for actually engaging with people with whom you don’t share common ground. His book is called “Talking Across the Divide: How to Communicate with People You Disagree with and Maybe Even Change the World” (Tarcher Perigee).

Duration:00:48:39

How Houston Became The Beating Heart Of Cardiac Care

8/14/2018
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For more than 50 years, the medical community has tried to create an artificial heart. Texas Monthly executive editor Mimi Swartz joins us to talk about the challenges of creating a heart – and why the only option for patients in need of one remains a transplant. Her new book is called “Ticker: The Quest to Create an Artificial Heart” (Crown Publishing). She’ll talk about it tonight at Interrabang Books in Dallas.

Duration:00:48:35

A Former U.S. Ambassador To Russia Speaks Out

8/14/2018
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For three years, Michael McFaul served as the Obama administration’s ambassador to Russia. And he made headlines when President Trump suggested he might be willing to allow Kremlin officials to interrogate the former ambassador following the Helsinki summit with Vladimir Putin. McFaul joins us to talk about the precedent that could set – and the current state of U.S.-Russia relations. His new book is called“From Cold War to Hot Peace: An American Ambassador in Putin’s Russia”(Houghton...

Duration:00:48:36

What If We Just Let Wildfires Burn?

8/13/2018
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Officials in California are warning that the largest of the state’s wildfires won’t be contained until September. The fires have already consumed hundreds of thousands of acres of land and caused billions of dollars in damages. Richard Manning joins us to explain why these fires are becoming increasingly common – and if it’s possible to prevent them. His story about wildfires appears in the current issue of Harper’s magazine.

Duration:00:48:42

The Racial Message Of Public Monuments

8/13/2018
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Cities across America are struggling with what to do with their monuments to Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and other leaders of the Confederacy. University of Pittsburgh historian Kirk Savage joins us to talk about that question – and about how these markers came to dominate public spaces. His new book is called“Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves: Race, War, and Monument in Nineteenth-Century America”(Princeton University Press).

Duration:00:48:41

Not Quite GMO: The Future Of Mutant Food

8/10/2018
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As the world’s population edges closer to 8 billion, scientists are at work figuring out how to feed all those mouths. Stephen Hall joins us to talk about how gene editing may be the solution. His story “CRISPR Can Speed Up Nature: And Change How We Grow Food” appears in Wired magazine.

Duration:00:48:41

That Time We Could Have Fixed Global Warming

8/9/2018
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In the 1980s, scientists began to thoroughly understand the potential dangers of climate change. Nathaniel Rich joins us to talk about the many reasons why that understanding wasn’t put into action – and how that delay has only increased the pressure on current scientists and policymakers. His story “Losing Earth: The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change” appears in The New York Times magazine.

Duration:00:48:40

What Makes A Country A Country

8/9/2018
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The map of the world feels fairly settled. There are a number of spots across the globe, however, that operate like countries without formal recognition. Slate staff writer Joshua Keating joins us to talk about these self-proclaimed nations, which he writes about in “Invisible Countries: Journeys to the Edge of Nationhood”(Yale University Press).

Duration:00:48:40

Texans Weigh In On Healthcare And Politics

8/8/2018
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Incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz leads challenger Beto O’Rourke by just two points. That’s according to this year’s Texas Lyceum poll, released last week. Joshua Blank oversaw the polling, and he joins us to talk about the political climate in Texas – and about how Texans view another important topic: healthcare.

Duration:00:48:39

One Man’s Crusade To Cure HIV

8/7/2018
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Dr. Joseph Lange may well have been on the cusp of ending HIV when his Malaysian Airlines flight was shot down by pro-Russian rebels in 2014. Dr. Seema Yasmin joins us to talk about Lange’s research into how the virus is transferred from mother to child – and about how his death has slowed progress towards a cure. Yasmin’s new book is called“The Impatient Dr. Lange: One Man’s Fight to End the Global HIV Epidemic”(Johns Hopkins University Press).

Duration:00:48:38

The World May Be Running Out Of Sand. Seriously.

8/7/2018
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A grain of sand may seem inconsequential. But these tiny specs are the building blocks for everything from roads to computers. Vince Beiser joins us to talk about the importance of sand as a natural resource – and about the very real possibility that we may be running out of it. His new book is called “The World in a Grain: The Story of Sand and How it Transformed Civilization” (Riverhead Books).

Duration:00:48:39

The Power Of A Humble Leader

8/6/2018
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As CEO of Dallas-basedCitySquare, Larry James is a leader in the fight against poverty. He joins us to talk about why effective leaders focus their efforts on the people they manage and serve. His new book is called“House Rules: Insights for Innovative Leaders”(Leafwood Publishers).

Duration:00:48:28

For Profit Colleges: Cost More And Worth Less?

8/6/2018
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Tressie McMillan Cottom was once a recruiter at two for-profit colleges. She joins us to talk about why these institutions often contribute to economic inequality, which she writes about in“Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy”(The New Press).

Duration:00:48:40

Why A Lake On Mars Is Such A Big Deal

8/3/2018
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Italian researchers recently discovered what they believe to be a lake on Mars. Steve Clifford of the Planetary Science Institute joins us to talk about the significance of the discovery on a planet previously thought to only contain ice – and about what it could mean for colonization efforts.

Duration:00:48:40