Indiana Jones: Myth, Reality and 21st Century Archaeology-logo

Indiana Jones: Myth, Reality and 21st Century Archaeology

VoiceAmerica

This show targets an audience interested in archaeology. It explores myths surrounding this exotic, often misunderstood field and acquaints listeners with the contemporary practice of unearthing the human past. Themes range from Dr. Schuldenrein’s own “Indiana Jones”-like adventures in the land of the Bible to his team’s archaeological forensics effort to unearth Kurdish mass graves in Iraq. That undertaking helped convict Saddam Hussein in 2006. Topical issues contribute to the evolution vs. creationism controversy based on updated fossil records and innovative DNA studies. An episode highlights the main funding source for archaeology in the U.S. (Hint: the oil and gas industry). Experts reveal the latest high-tech approaches to buried archaeological landscapes that provide clues to understanding climate change, past, present and future.

This show targets an audience interested in archaeology. It explores myths surrounding this exotic, often misunderstood field and acquaints listeners with the contemporary practice of unearthing the human past. Themes range from Dr. Schuldenrein’s own “Indiana Jones”-like adventures in the land of the Bible to his team’s archaeological forensics effort to unearth Kurdish mass graves in Iraq. That undertaking helped convict Saddam Hussein in 2006. Topical issues contribute to the evolution vs. creationism controversy based on updated fossil records and innovative DNA studies. An episode highlights the main funding source for archaeology in the U.S. (Hint: the oil and gas industry). Experts reveal the latest high-tech approaches to buried archaeological landscapes that provide clues to understanding climate change, past, present and future.

Location:

Yonkers, NY

Networks:

VoiceAmerica

Description:

This show targets an audience interested in archaeology. It explores myths surrounding this exotic, often misunderstood field and acquaints listeners with the contemporary practice of unearthing the human past. Themes range from Dr. Schuldenrein’s own “Indiana Jones”-like adventures in the land of the Bible to his team’s archaeological forensics effort to unearth Kurdish mass graves in Iraq. That undertaking helped convict Saddam Hussein in 2006. Topical issues contribute to the evolution vs. creationism controversy based on updated fossil records and innovative DNA studies. An episode highlights the main funding source for archaeology in the U.S. (Hint: the oil and gas industry). Experts reveal the latest high-tech approaches to buried archaeological landscapes that provide clues to understanding climate change, past, present and future.

Language:

English

Contact:

92 Main St Yonkers, NY 10705 914-423-3861


Episodes

Encore: Shipwrecks and Science: The Emergence of Underwater Archaeology

4/19/2017
With over 70% of the earth’s surface covered in water, much of the world is inaccessible to archaeologists employing traditional, land-based archaeological techniques. Employing new procedures and methodologies, the father of underwater archaeology, Dr. George Bass, revolutionized the field in the 1960's by demonstrating that rigorous scientific analysis could be conducted under water. Journey into the fascinating and unique world of underwater and nautical archaeology with our very special...

Duration:00:56:41

Climate Change and Archaeology

4/12/2017
In this episode we explore the role of archaeology in climate science, examining contemporary and ancient climate change. Our guests, Assistant Professor Dr. John Marston at Boston University’s Department of Archaeology and the Director of the BU Environmental Archaeology Laboratory, and Dr. Catherine West, Research Assistant Professor and the Director of the BU Zooarchaeology Lab, join Dr. Schuldenrein to discuss their cutting-edge research and methodologies. Pertinent and illuminating,...

Duration:00:55:03

Haircombs and Vikings: The Archaeology of Everyday Life

4/5/2017
What do we really know about the Vikings? In this episode, Dr. Steve Ashby, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology at the University of York, discusses his fascinating research into the archaeology of everyday life in Viking-Age England, Scotland and Scandinavia. Dr. Ashby’s research on everyday hair combs found in many urban Viking-age sites illuminates details about social identity, craft, and trade heretofore poorly understood. Join in as Dr. Ashby explains his novel approach to...

Duration:00:56:24

Dr. Asma Ibrahim: Pakistan's First Female Archaeologist

3/29/2017
Archaeologist and museologist Dr. Asma Ibrahim joins the program to discuss the state of archaeology and heritage preservation in Pakistan. As one of the only female archaeologists operating in Pakistan, Dr. Ibrahim discusses her career path and the hardships she has had to overcome in pursuit of her goals. Though her work and research has spanned the globe, she has dedicated much of her professional life to advancing the preservation efforts of archaeological sites and traditional arts and...

Duration:00:54:37

The Fascinating Field of Industrial Archaeology

3/15/2017
The prevalence of pipeline projects in CRM is bringing archaeologists into increasing contact with the material remains of industry and technology. However, as a field of inquiry, industrial archaeology is woefully understudied and underappreciated. In this episode, Dr. Timothy J. Scarlett of the Industrial Heritage and Archaeology Program at Michigan Technological University -- one of the only programs of its kind in the US – joins the program to discuss the current state of industrial...

Duration:00:56:45

Evaluating Significance: The NPS and New Philadelphia

3/8/2017
The Town of New Philadelphia, Illinois was founded by ex-slave Frank McWorter in 1836, making it the first town legally registered by an African American in the US. Frank and his wife Lucy bought, worked and sold acres of land to help raise the enormous sums needed to purchase the freedom of family members. Since 2002, excavations and public archaeology programs have helped to resurrect the story of New Philadelphia, implicating America’s fraught racial past and giving voice to African...

Duration:00:54:50

Catastrophe and Collapse: The Mediterranean World in the Late Bronze Age

2/15/2017
Joining Dr. Schuldenrein in this week's episode is award-winning author and George Washington University Classics and Anthropology professor Eric H. Cline. Specializing in biblical archaeology and the Mediterranean world of the Late Bronze Age (1700-1100 BC), Dr. Cline discusses his recent book, “1177: The Year Civilization Collapsed” and his current research as co-director of the Tel Kabri project in Israel. Drs. Schuldenrein and Cline journey back into the world of the Late Bronze Age in...

Duration:00:55:56

Recent Advances in Southeastern Archaeology

2/8/2017
Everything you have ever wanted to know about Southeastern archaeology, but were too afraid to ask. Dr. David G. Anderson, a practitioner and academic with decades of experience in the Southeastern US and Caribbean, talks with Dr. Joe Schuldenrein about current research, new methodologies, and recent advances in the archaeology of the southeastern United States. Using synergistic approaches to archaeological research and collaborative digital resources, Dr. Anderson explores the development...

Duration:00:55:48

The Bourbon Archaeologist: Heritage and Community in Kentucky

2/1/2017
In 2016, the Buffalo Trace Distillery hired Kentucky archaeologist Nicolas Laracuente to lead an excavation of the remains of a late-19th century production facility buried and long forgotten underneath the floor of the active distillery. Dubbed the “Bourbon Pompeii,” these largely intact structural remains offer a unique glimpse into the heritage and history of bourbon production in Kentucky. Laracuente, in addition to his official job with the Kentucky Heritage Council, volunteers much of...

Duration:00:55:47

The Importance of Major Archaeological Organizations: The Society for Historical Archaeology

1/18/2017
The world’s largest organization dedicated to the archaeology of the modern world turns 50 in 2017. Join us as Dr. Schuldenrein talks with Society for Historical Archaeology President Dr. JW Joseph about the importance, history and future of the SHA. In a reflection of the value of professional organizations like the SHA to the discipline, Dr. Joseph provides a necessary critique of archaeology’s relationship with African-American history, research and descendant communities. In particular,...

Duration:00:56:27

Fed Up: Archaeology and Federal Compliance and Legislation

1/11/2017
In the lead up to the presidential inauguration on Jan 20, 2017, Dr. Joe Schuldenrein and special guest Dr. Kimball Banks explore the role the federal government plays in archaeological compliance and legislation. Starting with the Antiquities Act of 1906, the US government has been in the business of enacting legislation aimed at protecting America’s cultural and archaeological heritage. But how does it work? What are the various agencies that regulate projects in the US and how do they...

Duration:00:57:17

Thoroughly Modern Archaeologists: Building a Career in the 21st Century

12/28/2016
The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 drastically changed archaeology by creating new and novel ways of building a career. Where once the blueprint of success was rooted in academia, now archaeologists are employed in a variety of jobs in applied anthropology and cultural resource management. Instructive for students and professionals alike, Dr. Joe Schuldenrein and frequent contributor Dr. Stanton Green discuss changes in career paths, job opportunities, funding and educational...

Duration:00:55:52

Encore: Christmas Tree Ship

12/21/2016
Happy end of the year holiday's Indy Fans! Tonight mere days away from Christmas we have a themed show to further the spirit of the holidays! We are joined by Dr. Tamara Thomsen, a maritime archaeologist based in Wisconsin. The connection may not seem clear between maritime archaeology and Christmas, but there is a phenomenal story we about to be told. Gather round and listen to the true story of the schooner Rouse Simmons, the lumber trade in Wisconsin, Captain Santa, and the (re)discovery...

Duration:00:55:39

Archaeology and the DAPL

12/14/2016
A special episode devoted to the Dakota Access Pipeline. The DAPL, Energy Transfer Partners 1,170 mile pipeline traversing parts of North and South Dakota, threatens water sources and culturally significant sites in and around the Standing Rock Reservation. Protests over the placement of the pipeline through tribal land is but the most recent episode in almost 200 years of strife between the Great Sioux Nation, or Oceti Sakonwin, and the US government regarding native sovereignty and rights....

Duration:00:56:22

Crises in Archaeology: The 2016 Presidential Election and the DAPL

12/7/2016
The 2016 presidential election and the Dakota Access Pipeline are two key issues facing American archaeology today. Join Dr Schuldenrein as he explores how the Trump administration and a republican controlled congress may impact archaeology and historic preservation, including threats to federal legislation. Currently, cultural and environmental protections are at the forefront of the protests levied by the Standing Rock Sioux and their advocates against the Dakota Access Pipeline, Energy...

Duration:00:57:32

Encore: X Marks the Spot: Shipwrecks in the Gulf of Mexico

10/12/2016
While pirates have always been a source of public fascination, piracy has seen a recent surge in both news headlines and popular culture, including the newly-released film Captain Phillips, starring Tom Hanks. While the term pirate readily conjures up a variety of images, including peg-legs, nefarious skull and cross bone flags, and squawking parrots, pirates cannot be separated from treasure. But what do we really know about pirates? Most of our understanding comes from popular fictional...

Duration:00:55:02

Encore: A Transformative Force: The Environmental Impact of the Baltic Crusades

10/5/2016
The crusaders who launched a bloody holy war against the pagan societies of the Eastern Baltic left a profound legacy

Duration:00:58:10

Encore: A Transformative Force: The Environmental Impact of the Baltic Crusades

10/5/2016
The crusaders who launched a bloody holy war against the pagan societies of the Eastern Baltic left a profound legacy – the construction of spectacular castles that still exist today as ruins or preserved as historical monuments, and the development of towns that reorganized the region into a uniquely European society and brought it under Christendom. But the effect that these crusading armies had on the landscape goes even further than architectural changes. Dr. Aleks Pluskowski and Dr....

Duration:00:58:10

Encore: Birds of a feather: Chaco trade and Macaws

9/28/2016
Researchers recently conducted radiocarbon tests on the bones of 30 scarlet macaws, originally excavated in 1897, stored at New York’s American Museum of Natural History.

Duration:00:57:19

Encore: Birds of a feather: Chaco trade and Macaws

9/28/2016
Researchers recently conducted radiocarbon tests on the bones of 30 scarlet macaws, originally excavated in 1897, stored at New York’s American Museum of Natural History. Their findings are causing the previous theories about the development of civilization in Mesoamerica to molt away. The macaw skeletons were much older than previously thought. While no one is ruffled by the data, a different understanding of trade and society is being hatched. The result of the findings suggests that Chaco...

Duration:00:57:19