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The Economist: All Audio

The Economist

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.
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London, United Kingdom

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The Economist

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

Language:

English


Episodes

The week ahead: Age-old problems

11/16/2018
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Our journalists speak with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe about Japan’s growing demographic crisis, and what he wants to be remembered for. A crushing famine in a massive region of Africa may have peaked, but it still threatens millions. How can this tragedy be mitigated, or future risks avoided? And, scientists are dealing with a weight problem they’ve had for some time: the definition of the kilogram.

Duration:00:17:25

The Economist asks: Anthony Scaramucci

11/15/2018
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Anne McElvoy asks the former White House communications director whether Donald Trump is true to his base. They debate the wisdom of doing battle with the press, if the president’s lies matter and what a Democratic challenger in 2020 should learn from his populist style

Duration:00:27:34

Babbage: The blame game

11/14/2018
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Should climate change be a matter of human rights? Also, gene drives' controversial potential to wipe out entire species of mosquitoes. And, a novel watch spring that could change the way mechanical watches are designed. Kenneth Cukier hosts

Duration:00:16:00

Money talks: Monopolies and boardroom games

11/13/2018
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How powerful firms could undermine public faith in capitalism. Shakespearean drama in Nokia’s boardroom. And most businesses are ramping up their holiday hiring, but where will they find workers? Simon Long hosts. Music by TeknoAXE CC by 4.0 (Cello Zen, The Cold of the Night)

Duration:00:17:01

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the November 10th 2018 edition

11/12/2018
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After America's mid-term elections, how do the Democrats need to change their game to succeed in 2020? Also, a tour of the entrepreneurial city that brought blue jeans to the Soviet Union, and five minutes that changed an astronaut’s life. Anne McElvoy hosts

Duration:00:13:59

The week ahead: Sessions ails

11/9/2018
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President Trump wastes no time after America's mid-term elections before sacking Jeff Sessions, the attorney-general. What will the ouster mean for the special counsel’s Russia investigation? As NATO concludes its largest exercises since the cold war, we look at the political and logistical headwinds the alliance faces. And next week Tencent, a Chinese tech behemoth, will report more dismal results; how can it withstand the Chinese government’s pressure on games makers? Jason Palmer hosts

Duration:00:26:52

The Economist asks: Where next for a divided America?

11/9/2018
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After the hoopla of the mid-term elections - blue wave or red comeback - what does this all mean for America? Anne McElvoy talks to our US Editor, John Prideaux, Chip Roy, former advisor to Ted Cruz, Tim Ryan, Democratic Representative from Ohio, Deb Haaland, one of the first native American women elected to Congress, and Democratic Party strategist Celinda Lake. Who won and what does it mean for 2020?

Duration:00:39:19

Babbage: Economist in space

11/7/2018
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Highlights from The Economist’s Space Summit in New York, including an interview with Apollo 9 astronaut Russell 'Rusty' Schweickart. Also, how to prepare for space exploration with Dava Newman, Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics at MIT. And, astrophysicist Simonetta Di Pippo and astronaut Leroy Chiao discuss worldwide cooperation in space. Tom Standage hosts

Duration:00:23:11

The Secret History of the Future: Infinite Scroll

11/7/2018
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The Renaissance scholars couldn’t keep up with new information (“Have you read the latest Erasmus book?” “I don’t have time!”) and needed a better way to organize it. Thus came the invention of tables of contents, indexes, book reviews, encyclopedias, and other shortcuts. What kinds of technological solutions might help us cope with the information overload we all experience today? Guests include: Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack; Nathan Jurgenson, Snapchat sociologist.

Duration:00:40:22

Money talks: Mid-term matters

11/6/2018
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As Americans go to the polls, how will Mr. Trump's economic policies play out in the mid-term elections? Who will benefit from America's opportunity zones? And, the buzz around the SEC and what business bosses really think about President Trump. Simon Long hosts

Duration:00:21:06

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the November 3rd 2018 edition

11/5/2018
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In this week’s issue, could America’s mid-term elections stop the toxic polarisation of federal politics? Plus, how artificial intelligence could transform life for urban commuters. And a glimpse of the treasures to be found in translation. Anne McElvoy hosts Music: “Sad Marimba Planet” by Lee Rosevere (CCx4.0)

Duration:00:12:17

The week ahead: America’s mid-terms

11/2/2018
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Next week, Americans head to the polls. Why will it be such a consequential election? President Donald Trump has made a caravan of Central American migrants into an object of scaremongering—but the migrants don’t know of the political fight they’re heading into. And voter suppression is likely to have big effects in tight races; we take a look at the one for Georgia’s governor. Jason Palmer hosts

Duration:00:26:54

The Economist asks: Angela's exit

11/1/2018
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Joschka Fischer, former foreign minister and leader of the Green party in Germany, and Anne McElvoy discuss life after Chancellor Merkel’s retreat from power and whether Germany’s dominance in Europe is in jeopardy. Also Merkel's historian, Andreas Roedder, and our Europe Editor, Christopher Lockwood, on who could succeed her. Music: “Sad Marimba Planet” by Lee Rosevere, “What Does Anybody Know About Anything” by Chris Zabriskie (CC x 4.0)

Duration:00:28:09

Babbage: Turning the oceans green

10/31/2018
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Can greenhouse emissions be cut in maritime transport? Also, with the US midterms a week away, Courtney Kennedy from PEW Research Centre discusses the reliability of polling data. And the artificial intelligence system being tested as a way to cut down train delays. Kenneth Cukier hosts

Duration:00:20:45

The Secret History of the Future: A Little Less Conversation

10/31/2018
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Some people thought the laying of the transatlantic cable might bring world peace, because connecting humans could only lead to better understanding and empathy. That wasn’t the outcome, and recent utopian ideas about communication (Facebook might bring us together and make us all friends!) have also met with a darker reality (Facebook might polarize us and spread false information!). Should we be scared of technology that promises to connect the world? Guests include: Robin Dunbar, inventor...

Duration:00:32:14

Money talks: End of Austerity?

10/30/2018
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Analysis of Britain's budget with our Britain economics correspondent. What is driving the fall in tech stocks? And, is Harley Davidson struggling to fire on all cylinders? Helen Joyce hosts. Sound effect: THE_bizniss (cc x 3.0)

Duration:00:17:28

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the October 27th 2018 edition

10/29/2018
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Australia’s economy has been growing for a record 27 years without a recession—could the rest of the world benefit from playing by Aussie rules? Also, how China’s tech giants are revolutionising pig farming. And the ethical dilemmas of programming autonomous cars. Christopher Lockwood hosts. Music: "Super Hero" by TeknoAXE, "Candlepower" by Chris Zabriskie (CCx4.0)

Duration:00:12:29

The week ahead: Oil and trouble

10/26/2018
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What will the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi Arabian journalist, do to Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman’s image, and to already-jittery oil markets? Eritreans continue to spill across the border with Ethiopia, which opened last month—but they worry about it closing again. And our journalists vote on the face to grace Britain’s new £50 note; why do banknotes’ famous figures stir such fervour? Jason Palmer hosts Music: "Making a Change"; "Evocative"; "I'm going for a Coffee"; by Lee...

Duration:00:25:07

The world ahead: Universal lessons

10/25/2018
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What would it look like if every child around the world attended school? And we also consider how far the ‘gig economy’ can go. Also, we ask the question: what foodstuff will be sustaining mankind in the future? Hal Hodson hosts Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)

Duration:00:17:32

The Economist asks: What does it mean to be educated?

10/25/2018
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Tara Westover was 17 when she first stepped into a classroom, but went on to earn a PhD. She talks to Anne McElvoy about a childhood on the edge of society, why she chose philosophy over coding—and what unorthodox education might teach the mainstream

Duration:00:18:58