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The Economist: All Audio

The Economist

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.
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London, United Kingdom

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The Economist

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

Language:

English


Episodes

The Secret History of the Future: A Clock in the Sky

10/17/2018
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In 1714, British parliament offered a huge cash prize to anyone who could find a way to determine longitude at sea. And it worked, sort of ... several decades later. Are modern contests (DARPA challenges, the X Prize) offering riches and glory an effective way to spur technological innovation? Guests include: Dava Sobel, author of Longitude.

Duration:00:37:16

Money talks: Sears of change

10/16/2018
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Sears, the giant of American retail, goes bankrupt. The shale boom has made America the world’s top oil producer: is it sustainable? And is Weight Watchers over “weight”? Helen Joyce hosts

Duration:00:15:22

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the October 13th 2018 edition

10/15/2018
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Many economies are not ready to deal with even a mild recession—they need to start preparing now. Also, winemakers square up to the weed entrepreneurs of California. And why London is the money-laundering capital of the world. Josie Delap hosts

Duration:00:11:31

The week ahead: Saudi repression

10/12/2018
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After the disappearance of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Saudi Arabia is starting to look like an old-fashioned Arab dictatorship. And could the drug MDMA help sufferers recover from post-traumatic stress disorder? Also, in France Marine Le Pen’s new National Rally is hoping to come top in next year’s European elections. Jason Palmer hosts Music: "An Empty Place" by Sarin, "Rain" by Meydän, "Cylinder Four" by Chris Zabriskie (CC x 4.0)

Duration:00:24:34

The Economist asks: What would Churchill do in 2018?

10/11/2018
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We ask Andrew Roberts, historian and Churchill biographer, how the most famous British Prime Minister might have responded to today’s global turmoil. What can current politicians learn from his legacy - and are 21st century critics right about his flaws? Anne McElvoy hosts

Duration:00:26:25

Babbage: What a difference half a degree makes

10/10/2018
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This week's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report recommends keeping the global increase in temperature below 1.5°C. We ask how governments and companies can reach "net zero" and whether the global economy can both grow and go green? Kenneth Cukier talks to one of the authors of the report, an advisor to Costa Rica on its pioneering decarbonisation plan and the European refineries industry body on its green efforts. Music: Smooth as Glass by The Freeharmonic Orchestra (CC x 4.0)

Duration:00:23:28

The Secret History of the Future: From Zero to Selfie

10/10/2018
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In 1969, an anthropologist introduced photographs and films to people in Papua New Guinea who’d never seen themselves represented in media before. It changed their conception of the world. In modern society, social media floods us with imagery at a pace we’ve never encountered before, and powerful video manipulation technology threatens to blur the line between real and fake. Are we the new Papuans, about to be overwhelmed by a wholesale media shift? Guests include: Nathan Jurgenson,...

Duration:00:39:19

Money talks: How do you solve a problem like Brasilia?

10/9/2018
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The next president of Brazil will inherit a public-finance crisis. Far-right populist Jair Bolsonaro is on track to win - what are the implications if he's elected? Britain’s crackdown on dirty money. And the challenges of overcoming another global recession. Helen Joyce hosts.

Duration:00:20:11

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the October 6th 2018 edition

10/8/2018
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Chinese investment in Europe is soaring, with benefits for both parties, but Europeans are beginning to worry. The design decisions in our favourite technologies that bring out the worst versions of ourselves. And why potatoes are no longer cheap as chips. Anne McElvoy hosts

Duration:00:12:02

The week ahead: Dances with wolves

10/5/2018
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After a contentious party conference in Birmingham, has Prime Minister Theresa May emerged intact? Lessons from the earthquake and tsunami that rocked Indonesia. And: why is the European potato in crisis? Christopher Lockwood hosts.

Duration:00:16:56

The world ahead: Xi’s world order

10/4/2018
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What would the world look like if China made the international rules? Also, what if actors were replaced by digital versions of themselves? We also consider how the future is framed for eyewear. Anne McElvoy hosts

Duration:00:20:45

The Economist asks: What can history teach spies?

10/4/2018
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Christopher Andrew, author of "The Secret World", warns intelligence services of the dangers of historical attention span deficit disorder. He argues we can only understand Vladimir Putin — and allegations of meddling in foreign elections — in the context of the long history of Russia. And who was the Edward Snowden of the Victorian era? Anne McElvoy hosts. Music by Chris Zabriskie, “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)

Duration:00:21:50

Babbage: The Nobel winners explained

10/3/2018
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Economist science correspondents break down the discoveries that won this year's Nobel prizes. Tristan Harris, a former design ethicist at Google, discusses the dangerous ways that the tech industry competes for our attention. And: the story of blackest fish in the deep ocean. Kenneth Cukier hosts

Duration:00:17:28

The Secret History of the Future: Human Insecurity

10/3/2018
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The French telegraph system was hacked in 1834 by a pair of thieves who stole financial market information — effectively conducting the world’s first cyber attack. What does the incident teach us about network vulnerabilities, human weakness, and modern-day security? Guests include: Bruce Schneier, famed hacker.

Duration:00:32:54

Money talks: Musk do better!

10/2/2018
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Could Italy’s new budget plans lead to a fresh Eurozone crisis? Elon Musk versus the regulators. And the challenges of replacing the LIBOR rate. Helen Joyce hosts. Music adapted from track by The Waiters (CC by 3.0 UK)

Duration:00:15:25

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the September 29th 2018 edition

10/1/2018
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As America fights over the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, does the #MeToo movement risk becoming just another battlefield in the culture wars? Why aping the lives of top executives is not the secret to professional success. And the final chapter for China’s most beloved storyteller. Anne McElvoy hosts

Duration:00:13:00

The week ahead: The fight to confirm Brett Kavanaugh

9/28/2018
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As allegations of sexual assault threaten to derail the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the US Supreme Court, US editor John Prideaux gives his reaction to an emotionally charged day of testimony in Washington. Anne McElvoy digs into the risk of a "no-deal" Brexit. And David Rennie reports on immigration to Guangzhou. Robert Guest hosts Music by Noxive, “Resilience”, and Aether, "Umber" (CC by 4.0 UK)

Duration:00:23:28

The Economist asks: Bishop Michael Curry

9/27/2018
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The first black presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church tells Anne McElvoy about the invitation to speak at the royal wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry. Also, his views on the role of religion in a divided America and whether President Donald Trump acts in good faith

Duration:00:23:06

Babbage: Lessons from Spanish flu

9/26/2018
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What can we learn from the Spanish flu pandemic which killed over 50 million people a hundred years ago? Carl Malamud, founder of public.resource.org, wants to make more data public. And, is food actually scarce at the bottom of the ocean? Kenneth Cukier hosts.

Duration:00:17:10

The Secret History of the Future: The Fault in Our Cars

9/26/2018
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The first pedestrian killed by a car in the western hemisphere was on New York’s Upper West Side in 1899. One newspaper warned that “the automobile has tasted blood.” Today, driverless cars present their own mix of technological promise and potential danger. Can the reaction to that 1899 pedestrian tragedy help us navigate current arguments about safety, blame, commerce, and public space? Guests include: Missy Cummings, Navy fighter pilot and head of the Duke Humans and Autonomy Lab.

Duration:00:36:10