60-Second Science-logo

60-Second Science

Science Podcasts >

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.
More Information

Location:

United States

Description:

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Language:

English


Episodes

Babies and Chimps Share a Laugh

11/10/2018
More
Adult humans laugh primarily on the exhale, but human babies laugh on the inhale and the exhale—as do chimps. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:09

Singing Fish Reveal Underwater Battles in the Amazon

11/8/2018
More
Researchers recorded piranha "honks" and catfish "screeches" in the Peruvian Amazon, which might illuminate fish activity in murky jungle waters. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:03

Social Construct of Race Imposes Biology

11/7/2018
More
Anthropologist Jennifer Raff argues that race is culturally created, but has biological consequences.

Duration:00:03:07

Pandas Swoon to Particular Croons

11/6/2018
More
Listening to the sounds panda pairs make when they're introduced could lead to better breeding success. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:29

First Benefit of Knowing Your Genome

11/2/2018
More
The "low hanging fruit" of genome-related health care will be knowing which drugs are likely to treat you best, says science journalist Carl Zimmer.

Duration:00:01:31

For Halloween, Consider the Chocolate Midge

10/31/2018
More
A tiny fly, related to biting no-see-ums, pollinates cacao trees and enables our chocolate cravings. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:10

Dolphins Dumb Down Calls to Compete with Ship Noise

10/30/2018
More
Bottlenose dolphins simplify and raise the pitch of their whistles to be heard above underwater shipping noise. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:35

Asocial Octopuses Become Cuddly on MDMA

10/22/2018
More
Octopuses react to MDMA much like humans do. And not surprisingly, given their anatomy, the animals are excellent huggers. Annie Sneed reports.

Duration:00:04:04

Science News Briefs from around the Globe

10/20/2018
More
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe, including one from Mongolia on horse dentistry.

Duration:00:02:11

Wild Songbirds Can Pick Up New Tunes

10/18/2018
More
Researchers taught two dozen wild sparrows new songs, by playing them the recordings of sparrows that live thousands of miles away. Jason G. Goldman reports.

Duration:00:03:22

Health Care Let Neandertals "Punch above Their Weight"

10/18/2018
More
By caring for their sick and injured, Neandertals were able to expand into more dangerous environments and pursue more deadly prey. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:29

Nice People Have Emptier Wallets

10/16/2018
More
A study correlating personality traits with financial data found that agreeable people had lower savings, higher debt and higher bankruptcy rates. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:15

Solar Eclipse Was a Buzzkill for Bees

10/13/2018
More
Bees suddenly fell silent when the sun disappeared during last year's solar eclipse—perhaps because they were tricked into night mode. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:31

Confident Tone Overcomes Accent Distrust

10/11/2018
More
English as-a-first-language Canadian study subjects were less trusting of statements in English spoken with a foreign accent, unless the speaker sounded confident about their assertion.

Duration:00:02:25

Mom's Genes Make Some Giraffes Hard to Spot

10/10/2018
More
Baby giraffes inherit aspects of their mothers' patterning—which could give them a survival advantage if good camouflage runs in the family. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:57

Economics Nobel Highlights Climate Action Necessity

10/9/2018
More
William Nordhaus shared the 2018 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, "for integrating climate change into long-run macroeconomic analysis,” with Paul Romer, "for integrating technological innovations into long-run macroeconomic analysis."

Duration:00:01:58

Highway Crossings Protect Migrating Pronghorns—and Motorists

10/6/2018
More
Twice a year, thousands of pronghorn antelope and mule deer migrate through Wyoming, and newly built highway crossings are sparing the lives of animals—and motorists. Jason G. Goldman reports.

Duration:00:03:13

Beer Fermentation Hops Along

10/4/2018
More
The bittering agents called hops have enzymes that chew up starch and unleash more fermentable sugar—which can boost alcohol and CO2 in the finished brew. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:50

Nobel in Chemistry for New and Useful Chemical Entities via Evolutionary Principles

10/3/2018
More
Frances H. Arnold, George P. Smith and Gregory P. Winter share the 2018 chemistry Nobel for developing evolutionary-based techniques that lead to the creation of new chemical entities with useful properties.

Duration:00:03:11

Nobel in Physics for Controlling Laser Light

10/2/2018
More
Arthur Ashkin, Gérard Mourou and Donna Strickland share the 2018 physics Nobel for their work with lasers that have led to numerous practical applications, such as eye surgery.

Duration:00:02:50