60-Second Science-logo

60-Second Science

Science Podcasts >

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.
More Information

Location:

United States

Description:

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Language:

English


Episodes

Nice People Have Emptier Wallets

10/16/2018
More
A study correlating personality traits with financial data found that agreeable people had lower savings, higher debt and higher bankruptcy rates. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:15

Solar Eclipse Was a Buzzkill for Bees

10/13/2018
More
Bees suddenly fell silent when the sun disappeared during last year's solar eclipse—perhaps because they were tricked into night mode. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:31

Confident Tone Overcomes Accent Distrust

10/11/2018
More
English as-a-first-language Canadian study subjects were less trusting of statements in English spoken with a foreign accent, unless the speaker sounded confident about their assertion.

Duration:00:02:25

Mom's Genes Make Some Giraffes Hard to Spot

10/10/2018
More
Baby giraffes inherit aspects of their mothers' patterning—which could give them a survival advantage if good camouflage runs in the family. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:57

Economics Nobel Highlights Climate Action Necessity

10/9/2018
More
William Nordhaus shared the 2018 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, "for integrating climate change into long-run macroeconomic analysis,” with Paul Romer, "for integrating technological innovations into long-run macroeconomic analysis."

Duration:00:01:58

Highway Crossings Protect Migrating Pronghorns—and Motorists

10/6/2018
More
Twice a year, thousands of pronghorn antelope and mule deer migrate through Wyoming, and newly built highway crossings are sparing the lives of animals—and motorists. Jason G. Goldman reports.

Duration:00:03:13

Beer Fermentation Hops Along

10/4/2018
More
The bittering agents called hops have enzymes that chew up starch and unleash more fermentable sugar—which can boost alcohol and CO2 in the finished brew. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:50

Nobel in Chemistry for New and Useful Chemical Entities via Evolutionary Principles

10/3/2018
More
Frances H. Arnold, George P. Smith and Gregory P. Winter share the 2018 chemistry Nobel for developing evolutionary-based techniques that lead to the creation of new chemical entities with useful properties.

Duration:00:03:11

Nobel in Physics for Controlling Laser Light

10/2/2018
More
Arthur Ashkin, Gérard Mourou and Donna Strickland share the 2018 physics Nobel for their work with lasers that have led to numerous practical applications, such as eye surgery.

Duration:00:02:50

Nobel for Helping the Immune System Fight Cancer

10/1/2018
More
James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo share the Nobel Prize for their work on harnessing the cancer patient's own immune system to destroy tumors.

Duration:00:01:59

Blasey Ford Spells Out Trauma Memory Formation

10/1/2018
More
Christine Blasey Ford's professional expertise came into play during her testimony regarding the Supreme Court nomination.

Duration:00:01:24

Scanning Ancient Civilizations from the Skies

9/27/2018
More
An aerial laser scan of more than 800 square miles of Guatemalan jungle revealed Maya buildings, canals, roads and bridges. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:18

Antifreeze Surface Fights Ice with Ice

9/26/2018
More
Patterning a surface with tiny stripes of ice prevents frost formation on the rest of the surface—a technique that could keep planes or roads frost-free. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:50

Scale Can Measure Medicine—and Play a Scale, Too

9/24/2018
More
Researchers have designed a musical instrument that can detect counterfeit drugs by the pitch of its notes. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:53

Diverse Tree Portfolio Weathers Droughts Better

9/22/2018
More
Forests with numerous tree species, and therefore a mix of water-management strategies, appear more tolerant of drought. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:07

Pirates Needed Science, Too

9/19/2018
More
On International Talk Like a Pirate Day, here's an eye-patch-witness account of how science helps in all peg-leg walks of life, even piracy

Duration:00:01:38

Sea Otters' Powerful Paw Prey Perception

9/19/2018
More
The marine mammals have extraordinarily sensitive touch—which helps them nab prey in the absence of other sensory cues. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:16

Science News Briefs from Around the World

9/17/2018
More
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe.

Duration:00:02:12

Genetic Tweak Gave Early Humans a Leg Up

9/13/2018
More
A mutation in a key gene may have endowed humans with superior endurance—allowing them to compete better with other animals on the savanna. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:33

Earlier Springs May Mean Mistimed Bird Migrations

9/12/2018
More
Springtime's arriving earlier across North America. But the degree of change isn't the same everywhere, which could spell trouble for migratory birds. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:25