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Science in Action

BBC

The BBC World Service's weekly look at new developments in science from around the world.

The BBC World Service's weekly look at new developments in science from around the world.
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London, United Kingdom

Networks:

BBC

Description:

The BBC World Service's weekly look at new developments in science from around the world.

Language:

English


Episodes

Science in Trump’s America

11/15/2018
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In the US mid-term elections, the Democrats gained a majority in the lower house, this means they take control of key committees – including the House Science Committee. Over recent years, this once bipartisan committee has been used by Republicans to push a climate change-denying agenda. Now the Democrats will regain control and the chair elect says she will be reinforcing that climate change is real and doing more to encourage participation in science at a grassroots level particularly...

Duration:00:26:40

Our Geological Junk

11/8/2018
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The junk and geology of the Anthropocene, how mankind’s influence of the planet is now producing more erosion than natural forces, and how the materials we’ve used for mining and building in the past provides a snapshot of our geological influence of the planet. Finland’s Water shortage: Even in places where water is seemingly plentiful there can be issues, particularly caused by growing populations. In Finland to try balance the needs of rural and urban communities, authorities have...

Duration:00:26:40

A Milky Way Merger

11/1/2018
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A Milky Way Merger An impact with galaxy Enceladus, around 10 billion years ago filled, our home galaxy, the Milky Way’s inner surrounding halo with stars and made the galactic disk much thicker, and starrier than it ought to be. Sniffing the Atmosphere for Ozone-Depleting Gases Carbon tetrachloride is one of several man-made gases that contribute to the depletion of the ozone layer high in the atmosphere. Because of this, restrictions were introduced on the use of this gas under the...

Duration:00:26:39

Why Free Movement is Crucial for Science

10/25/2018
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Two reports out this week are looking at internationalism and movement of scientists. The first is close to home in the form of a letter signed by a number of leading UK-based scientists (including 27 Nobel Laureates) to the UK Prime Minister and Jean-Claude Junker, President of the European Commission, citing grave concerns over Brexit becoming a barrier to scientific research, movement of scientists and collaboration. The second report is on the publication of results of a survey for the,...

Duration:00:26:28

Did the Climate Add to the Demise of Angkor?

10/18/2018
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Angkor, in what is now modern Cambodia, was the capital city of the Khmer Empire. It flourished from approximately the 9th to 15th centuries. Angkor was a megacity supporting at least a million people (0.1% of the global population) during 1010–1220. The city houses the magnificent temple Angkor Wat, one of Cambodia's popular tourist attractions. The city established a vast network of canals, embankments, moats and reservoirs to capture, store and distribute surface water resources. It was...

Duration:00:26:39

Will Earth Run Out Of Food?

10/11/2018
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With the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change announcing that we need to keep global warming under 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels, Science in Action explores the impact of food production on the environment. A new study calculates the current and predicted impact of land and fresh water use, fertiliser pollution and the change to more Western meat and dairy-based diets by 2050 and concluded that our current mitigation measures are not going to be enough. And that our planet will not...

Duration:00:27:31

Sulawesi – Earthquake, Tsunami, Volcanic Eruption

10/4/2018
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The Indonesian Island of Sulawesi has been battered by natural forces. First an earthquake, followed by a devastating tsunami and now a volcanic eruption. Science in Action looks at the multiple geological factors that put the people of Sulawesi in such danger. Hayabusa 2’s MASCOT Lander The Japanese spacecraft has successfully dropped the German-French observation robot and landed it on an asteroid, 300 million kilometres away, as part of a research effort that could find clues to the...

Duration:00:32:09

Hayabusa 2’s Rovers Land on Asteroid

9/27/2018
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The audacious Japanese space mission has successfully landed two rovers (Minerva II 1a + b) on the surface of asteroid Ryugu. The asteroid is currently 4 years travel away from Earth, so much of the mission has been carried out autonomously. Killer of Killer Whales Despite being banned in the 1980’s the organophosphate PCB is killing the world’s killer whales. As top predators, killer whales, or Orca, bioaccumulate the toxin in their fat reserves and then nursing mothers pass on the chemical...

Duration:00:30:24

Dickinsonia – The Earliest Known Animal

9/20/2018
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The earliest known animal – Ancient fat molecules shed light on what is the earliest known animal on Earth. Dickinsonia were strange creatures, ranging from a few millimetres to over a metre in diameter. These oval ‘quilted’ mattress like animals swam in ancient seas over 571 million years ago. When an extremely well-preserved fossil turned up in North Western Russia with steroidal fat molecules attached, the scientists could conclude that this fat cannot come from bacteria and is a marker...

Duration:00:26:28

The Path of Hurricane Florence

9/13/2018
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Despite the threat of Hurricane Florence to the US Eastern Seaboard, and the recent succession of tropical cyclones around the world, this current Atlantic hurricane season looks like it’ll just be an average storm season, after a slow start. Dr. Jill Trepanier, a climate scientist at Louisiana State University, studies the processes that create and sustain hurricanes, and explains why Florence is taking its unusual track to the North and South Carolina coast. Earliest Drawing A 73,000-year...

Duration:00:30:34

The True Cost of the Brazil Museum Fire

9/6/2018
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A fire has destroyed the National Museum of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro. Most of the natural history and anthropological artefacts have been wrecked. What is the impact on on-going scientific research and what is the loss to science in the future? Silurian Signature The Silurian hypothesis speculates on the possibility of a prior, advanced, industrialized civilization on Earth. But if there were such a civilization millions of years ago, what evidence would they leave behind and how would we...

Duration:00:29:05

Water on Mars

7/26/2018
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Scientists say they have discovered evidence of a 12 mile long body of water on Mars. Estimated to be at least a metre deep, the “lake” was found beneath the red planet’s southern polar ice cap by the agency’s radar probe, known as Marsis. While orbiting the planet on the European Space Agency’s Mars Express spacecraft, Marsis used ground-penetrating radar to send signals deep into the surface - and there was only one possible conclusion from the data that was bounced back to it. The...

Duration:00:28:23

The Biggest Explosions in the Universe

7/27/2017
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An international team of scientists have captured the biggest explosions in the Universe in unprecedented detail for the first time. These Gamma Ray Bursts sometimes last for just a few milliseconds, but for that time are trillions of times brighter than our Sun. The chance of capturing one of these rare bursts, which occur just as a dying star collapses into a black hole, is just an incredible one-in-10,000. Sight and Sound Despite the intuitive feeling that we can listen to something...

Duration:00:26:28