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Cambridge Forum is one of public radio’s longest running public affairs programs. Recorded live every week in Harvard Square, Cambridge Forum focuses on the news behind the news and regularly examines the issues and ideas that shape our lives. Our programs explore topics related to civic democracy, science and technology, history and the global environment, and include as well discussions about computers, education, art, and more.

Cambridge Forum is one of public radio’s longest running public affairs programs. Recorded live every week in Harvard Square, Cambridge Forum focuses on the news behind the news and regularly examines the issues and ideas that shape our lives. Our programs explore topics related to civic democracy, science and technology, history and the global environment, and include as well discussions about computers, education, art, and more.
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Location:

Cambridge, MA

Description:

Cambridge Forum is one of public radio’s longest running public affairs programs. Recorded live every week in Harvard Square, Cambridge Forum focuses on the news behind the news and regularly examines the issues and ideas that shape our lives. Our programs explore topics related to civic democracy, science and technology, history and the global environment, and include as well discussions about computers, education, art, and more.

Language:

English


Episodes

Good and Mad: How Women’s Anger is Reshaping America

8/6/2018
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Rebecca Traister, author and NY magazine journalist, examines the history of feminism and the #Metoo movement in the light of recent political events in Washington and beyond. Recorded October 1, 2018 POSTER Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger is an exploration into the transformative power of female anger and its ability to transcend into a political … Continue reading Good and Mad: How Women’s Anger is Reshaping America →

Duration:00:28:58

Learning to Look

8/6/2018
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Boston Globe art critic Sebastian Smee and Paul Tucker, curator of the Monet exhibitions at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts discuss the ways that looking at a work of art can open it up to reveal a rich web of information about the work itself, its maker and the society in which it was created. How does a work of art become meaningful for the beholder? Where can that appreciation lead the ordinary person?

Duration:00:38:05

Resilience: From PTSD to Hurricane Sandy

8/1/2018
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Psychiatrists Steven Southwick of Yale and Dennis Charney of Mount Sinai tell the stories of POWs, 9/11 survivors, and ordinary people with debilitating diseases or grievous personal losses. Weaving together the results of modern neurobiological research and the insights of two decades of clinical work with trauma survivors, Southwick and Charney identify ways to help individuals become more resilient.

Duration:00:28:55

Musicophilia

7/27/2018
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The late essayist-physician Oliver Sacks memorably reflected at Cambridge Forum on music and its mysterious relationship to the brain In his book, Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain, Sacks argued that music is essential to being human in ways that have only begun to be understood.

Duration:00:37:31

Is Capitalism Devouring Democracy?

5/9/2018
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The provocative and controversial ex-Greek finance minister of Greece and Professor of Economics at the University of Athens, Yanis Varoufakis, considers the need for a radically new way of thinking about the economy, and capitalism.

Duration:00:32:31

Columbus: The Four Voyages

9/19/2017
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Biographer Laurence Bergreen retraces the voyages of Christopher Columbus, placing the 15th century explorer into the context of the Age of Discovery. What were the political, moral, and economic costs of his four voyages? How significant was his achievement in his own time? What accounts for his lasting fame? Recorded November 2, 2011 Download audio file (CF-COLUMBUS-FOUR-VOYAGES.mp3)

Duration:00:38:01

Deadly Double Helix

9/7/2017
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Danielle Allen, Director of the Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard, discusses her new memoir “CUZ”. The book documents the events which conspired to cause the untimely death of her young cousin, Michael, on the streets of Los Angeles in 2009. A “deadly double helix” of narcotics and street gangs ultimately entrapped her cousin, as … Continue reading Deadly Double Helix →

Duration:00:28:02

Rwandan Women Rising

3/29/2017
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Swanee Hunt speaks about her experiences in Rwanda from her new book Rwandan Women Rising which follows the story of the women who worked for peace after the genocide in 1994. Today 64% of the seats in the Rwandan parliament are held by elected women, a number unrivaled by any other nation. Swanee Hunt chairs the … Continue reading Rwandan Women Rising →

Duration:00:33:36

Forever Young

10/27/2016
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Music and memories from the early days of the Harvard Square folk scene to the current state of the Americana genre. Betsy Siggins, raconteur extraordinaire, recalls her early days at the legendary Club 47 in Cambridge, with Joan Baez and Bob Dylan. Folklorist Millie Rahn joins the conversation, which will be interspersed with live music from multi-instrumentalist and songwriter, Jake Armerding.

Duration:00:28:55

All About Bees

4/20/2016
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Bees don't just make honey, they pollinate a third of our food supply. But bee colonies are disappearing at an alarming rate in the US. In addition to being ecologically essential, bees are highly social and complex creatures that are vulnerable to a barrage of attacks ranging from parasitic mites to pesticides and herbicides.

Duration:00:28:55

ALL ABOUT BEES

4/20/2016
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What is killing our honey bees? Can we save them? Cambridge Forum examines the plight of honey bees with the help of Noah Wilson-Rich from Best Bees and apiarist David Hackenberg of Buffy Bees from Lewisburg, PA. If you care about the future of food and want to learn more about how to ensure the survival of […]

Duration:00:28:54

Witness to History: Remembering Freedom Summer

8/31/2014
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Recorded on November 19, 2014 Fifty years ago the Civil Rights Movement, which was culminating nationally with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, was far from declaring victory. The experiences of the 1964 Freedom Summer demonstrated that a legal foundation for African American civil rights may have been a necessary condition but […]

Duration:00:28:50

Presidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era

8/20/2013
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Joseph Nye of the Harvard Kennedy School discusses the foreign policies of 20th century American presidents and assesses the effectiveness and ethics of their choices with David Gergen, Director of the Center for Public Leadership at the Kennedy School . He identifies two main types of presidential temperaments – transformational and transactional– and argues that […]

Duration:00:28:58

The Ecological Imagination

9/22/2011
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In this Cambridge Forum Classic, best-selling writer David Abram, author of The Spell of the Sensuous, tells a story that reveals the subtle dependence of human cognition on the natural environment. What lessons can we learn from our relationship with the natural world?

Duration:00:28:58

Descent Into Limbo

4/14/2011
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DESCENT INTO LIMBO: Maurice Sendak’s Life in Children’s Art For over five decades beloved children’s author Maurice Sendak has taken children and parents on amazing literary adventures, from the night kitchen to where the wild things are. He traces his lifelong journey in children’s literature and art. Follow Cambridge Forum on Twitter: Tweet

Duration:00:28:59