Day in Tech History-logo

Day in Tech History

Technology News >

More Information

Location:

United States

Language:

English


Episodes

December 7, 1978: Microsoft Staff Picture

12/6/2018
More
1978 – It is one of the most infamous pictures in tech today. This is the Microsoft crew. Can you guess which one is Bill Gates? The picture was updated in 2008 when the group (except Bob Wallace, who passed away in 2002) got back together for Bill Gates last few days at Microsoft (below). The staff picture includes: Bill Gates, Andrea Lewis, Marla Wood, Paul Allen (2nd row) Bob O’Rear, Bob Greenberg (who helped launch Cabbage Patch Kids), Marc McDonald, Gordon Letwin, (3rd row) Steve Wood,...

Duration:00:08:21

December 6th, 1768: Encyclopedia Britannica Published

12/5/2018
More
1768 – Encyclopedia Britannica began publishing the first print – otherwise known as “part I”. It was the brain child of Colin Macfarquhar, and Andrew Bell, and was a conservative reaction to the French Encyclopédie of Denis Diderot. The first volume would be completed Edinburgh, Scotland by 1771. The 3rd edition would become popular and also expand for the first time. Since then, the Britannica would be digitized and put on CD, then DVD format. Today’s current version has 400 editors and...

Duration:00:09:05

December 5, 1965: First Computer Science Degree: Richard Wexelblat

12/4/2018
More
1965 – Richard Wexelblat was the first candidate to complete his doctoral dissertation, hence giving him a degree in “Computer Science“. It was presented at the University of Pennsylvania – Moore School of Electrical Engineering. Richard went on to write the “History of Programming Languages” (ISBN:0-12-745040-8) This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 5 Today is the official birth of the Transistor Amazon Crashes HD Support for YouTube

Duration:00:06:05

December 4, 1985: Cray X-MP/48 Supercomputer

12/3/2018
More
1985 – The Cray X-mp/48 Supercomputer begins operation in San Diego Supercomputer Center in California. The $15 million dollar supercomputer could process 400 megaflops (200 per processor). It was a shared-memory parallel vector processor and supported 2 or 4 million 64-bit words of main memory in 16 or 32 banks. The first Cray didn’t get installed until October 1986. Cray X-MP/48 replaced the Cray-1. It was succeeded by the Cray Y-MP8/864 in 1990. Movies such as “the Last Starfighter” were...

Duration:00:04:44

December 3, 1981: Disbanding of IBM Data Processing Division

12/2/2018
More
1981 – For many years, whenever something came out, it was “IBM’s Data Processing Division releases”… Well, on Dec 3rd 1981, IBM decided and announced that the Data Processing Division was going to be absorbed into the IBM National Accounts Division (NAD), and the National Marketing Division. The 2 divisions would then become part of the Information SystemsGroup. This would be effective January 1982. The Data Processing Division was launched in 1956. IBM DPD had launched many 370 mainframe...

Duration:00:05:52

December 2, 1991: Apple Quicktime

12/1/2018
More
1991 – What was first a Multimedia add-on for System 6, Quicktime has spent 21 years being Apples’ proprietary player. The original version contained graphics, animation and Video codecs – What was refered to as “Road Pizza”. Since then Quicktime had developed on both Mac and Windows sides (starting in 1992). The current version is called Quicktime X but there are signs the technology is either moving a new direction or possibly retired. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for...

Duration:00:05:20

December 1, 2013: The Amazon Flying Drone Project

12/1/2018
More
2013 – Jeff Bezos is interviewed on the show “60 Minutes” on CBS with Charlie Rose. During his interview he unveils a project Amazon has been working on – Flying drone delivery. This secret R&D project called “Octocopter” will have drones fly the packages from outposts in each city to the homes. In a project Amazon is calling “Prime Air”, they expect the delivery system to be available in the next 4-5 years. Charlie Rose’ reaction summed it up. “Oh, my God!”. 1999 – It was the most expensive...

Duration:00:04:54

November 30, 1959: $2.9 Million IBM 7090 Mainframe

11/29/2018
More
1959 – Want to see a 2.9 million dollar computer? That was the IBM 7090 – a transistorized mainframe computer that was designed for scientific research and tech applications. It replaced the 709 series, which used vacuum tubes. The first two were delivered – one of the 7090’s would be used for the Mercury and Gemini space missions. Check out more on the IBM 7090 This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 30 The First Coaxial cable is installed Microsoft Vista is released to...

Duration:00:08:24

November 29, 1972: First Pong Machine

11/28/2018
More
1972 – Andy Cappa’s tavern in CA was the site for the first Pong game was wheeled into the establishment. The coin-operated game was put in by Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell and game designer Al Alcorn. The duo decided that making their own game – rather than having 3rd parties do it – would help keep costs down. They then turned an old Roller rink and converted to a production line. Pong was the first successful video game system. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 25...

Duration:00:05:08

November 28, 1983: Tandy TRS-80 Model 2000

11/27/2018
More
1983 – To counter IBM, Tandy releases the Tandy TRS-80 Model 2000 computer. It housed the 80186 processor and 128 KB of RAM. There were 2 – 720 KB floppy drives and the MS–DOS Operating System. The prices ranged from $2,750. For an additional fee you could get a Monochrome graphics card, optional color monitor and extra RAM. The Tandy 2000 was considerably faster than the IBM PC models. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 25 Sony releases the Playstation 2 in the US 33...

Duration:00:04:46

November 27, 1998: Sega Dreamcast Launched in Japan

11/26/2018
More
1998 – Sega releases their next generation console – the Dreamcast – in Japan. It didn’t get released in the US until Sept 9 1999, but it was one of the more successful console launches of it’s time.The Dreamcast had a 200 MHz processor with on-die 128-bit vector graphics engine. The graphics hardware is a PowerVR2 CLX2 chipset, sound was a Yamaha AICA Sound Processor and 16 MB 100 MHz RAM. The Dreamcast was discontinued on Jan 31, 2001 as Sega announced they were getting out of the console...

Duration:00:03:55

November 26, 2001 Intel at TeraHertz

11/25/2018
More
2001 – One problem with technology is that you hit limitations, mostly due to materials used or how small machines can make parts like transistors. For instance, today’s multi-core x86 processors will eventually be replaced because we won’t be able to put anymore transistors on the die – It’s called “Moores Law“. Intel and AMD work hard to get around this law – which is why x86 technology has been around since the 90’s.One thing scientists do to circumvent is to change the restructure the...

Duration:00:04:41

November 25, 2002: Roxio Purchased Napster

11/24/2018
More
2002 – While in Bankruptcy since the following September, Roxio – along with the Private Media Group – came in and took over the $2.43 million dollar company. They took all logos and names and rebranded it “Napster 2.0”. This time, Napster was a pay site – merging technologies with Roxio Pressplay.The sale completed in 2003Ultimately, the company was purchased by Best Buy in 2008. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 25 DVD Jon releases the crack to WMV9 codec ICANN and...

Duration:00:04:49

November 24, 2008: Novell Owns UNIX, UNIXWare

11/23/2018
More
2008 – After a long court battle with the Santa Cruz Operations (SCO) group, a judge rules that Novell is the owner of UNIX and UNIXWare copyrights. In 2003 – just after SCO changed their name from Caldera – had made a claim that the SCO IP was incorporated into Linux and that they should get a cut from each copy sold. Novell states that they own the code to UNIX and therefore this claim was not valid. Battles still goon to this day, with SCO group dwindled down to a shell (no pun intended)....

Duration:00:03:45

November 23, 1889: First Commercial Jukebox

11/22/2018
More
1889 – Congratulations to the first commercial jukebox which was installed in San Francisco, CA. It was called the “Nickel-in-the-Slot”, and played wax cylinder records. Within 6 months it would earn $1,000. The word “Juke” – by the way – means ‘disorderly house’ – therefore this is a disorderly box of music.Put another nickel in – in the Nickelodean – All I want is having you – and Music, music, music. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 23 Dr. Who first airs on the BBC...

Duration:00:05:49

November 22, 1994: Sega Saturn Released

11/21/2018
More
1994 – The Sega Saturn is released featuring 2 28.6 MHz processors running 32 bit. It had 2 video display processors, QSound surround and 2 MB of memory, with 1.5MB of video memory. It went for 44,800 Yen, or $450. 2005 – Microsoft launches the XBOX 360. It contained a IBM PowerPC with 3 cores at 3.2 GHz a core. It contained a 500 MHz ATI card and 512 MB of RAM. There were several versions starting at $249 and going up to $399. The limited Halo 3 version had a specially crafted case. This...

Duration:00:09:40

November 21, 2008: Justin.TV Online Suicide of Abraham Biggs

11/20/2018
More
2008 – Some watched in horror. Others watched thinking it was a joke. Still, Abraham Biggs was a troubled teen. He decided to end it all and do it in front of a live audience. He got on Justin.tv and told people he was taking sleeping pills. After a little while, he went to lie on his bed while the chat room continued on. Some posts encouraging him to continue were seen. Of course, in the end, Abraham Biggs could not be saved. Justin.tv closed its doors in August 2014 This Day in Tech...

Duration:00:05:58

November 20, 2013: AOL Tries to Shut Down WinAmp

11/19/2018
More
2013 – AOL shocked a lot of geeks when they announced WinAmp.com would be shutting down and the software would be no longer available come December 20th. The next day rumors surfaced that Microsoft was planning to buy it – which didn’t go further than the inital report. The service did not shut down though. On January 14th, 2014 it was announced a Belgian radio website called “Radionomy” had purchased the Nullsoft brand, including WinAmp and Shoutcast. 1963– 0|| 7|-|1$ d4’/, 7|-|3 //0rD...

Duration:00:06:04

November 19, 1993: Don’t Post Bomb Instructions Online

11/18/2018
More
1993 – The Ionizer – Otherwise known as Michael Elanky, recieved 28 months in prison for posting bomb-making instructions on his BBS. There have been other instances of this throughout history, but Elansky was a member of the International Information Retrieval Guild, a computer group very much concerned with freedom of speech and freedom of information. Like the group with which he was affiliated, Michael felt strongly about our First Amendment rights.Therefore, he posted on his BBS –...

Duration:00:05:33

November 18, 1985: Calvin and Hobbes

11/17/2018
More
1894 – The first Sunday Comics section is printed by the New York World. 1985 – 91 years later, Bill Watterson syndicates a comic about a boy and his stuffed Tiger. Calvin and Hobbes will bring laughter to millions for the next ten years. It reached through 2,400 newspapers (at it’s height) and spun off 18 books. Bill Watterson ended the comic on December 31st, 1995 and has left it retired since. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 18 A court says Microsoft is free to...

Duration:00:07:23