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Fearless Practice

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The Fearless Practice Podcast is for anyone who is either thinking of starting a private practice or who needs help with growing their practice in Canada. Julia Smith takes you on her journey from starting as a counsellor to totally killin’ it and growing her own practice in Halifax. After starting in 2016, she battled to find resources and help that related specifically to building a private practice in Canada. Today, she's sharing her tips as well as her not-to-be-repeated mistakes for fellow clinicians, therapists, social workers, and psychologists interested in starting and growing their own practice in Canada.

Location:

United States

Description:

The Fearless Practice Podcast is for anyone who is either thinking of starting a private practice or who needs help with growing their practice in Canada. Julia Smith takes you on her journey from starting as a counsellor to totally killin’ it and growing her own practice in Halifax. After starting in 2016, she battled to find resources and help that related specifically to building a private practice in Canada. Today, she's sharing her tips as well as her not-to-be-repeated mistakes for fellow clinicians, therapists, social workers, and psychologists interested in starting and growing their own practice in Canada.

Language:

English


Episodes

Marlee Rubel: Building an Online Private Practice in Toronto | Ep 111

2/21/2024
A lot of counsellors may start private practices because they want flexibility and autonomy in their professional lives, as well as for the fact that they have noticed a direct need that they feel passionate about serving. Marlee, today’s guest, decided to go into private practice for those reasons. In this podcast episode, Marlee and I discuss private practice, supporting mental health practitioners, and why building up a strong network - and resting! - are important. MEET MARLEE Marlee Rubel (she/her) is a Registered Psychotherapist offering clinical consultation, supervision, trainings, and program development to individuals, hospitals and various agencies within Toronto. Operating from a social justice oriented and trauma-informed lens, she specializes in complex trauma, queer experience, and relationship therapy in her clinical practice. She is the Clinical Director of Soft Landings Psychotherapy. Learn more about Marlee on her website, LinkedIn profile, and practice website In this episode: How Marlee started her private practice Supporting the not-for-profit sector with consulting Owning a virtual practice Marlee’s tips for listeners How Marlee started her private practice After completing her counselling degree, Marlee started working in a hospital as well as working part-time in a group private practice. Marlee only worked in the hospital for a year before changing to work in an addiction treatment program with a great team, but it was tough and challenging work to do. When Marlee was working in the addiction program and before in the hospital, she found that most people she worked with were burned out, and she knew that for her career that she wanted to do something different so she could provide care while also caring for herself. Supporting the not-for-profit sector with consulting One of the aspects of Marlee’s work is that she supports and helps counsellors working in the not-for-profit sector to not get burned out. Counsellors and therapists know how strained the mental health system is, and so many workers get burned out so easily since the need is so great but the system isn’t designed to support mental health practitioners when the strain inevitably gets too much. Owning a virtual practice Marlee hasn’t had many clients be upset or leave the practice due to it being a virtual business. In many ways, the virtual therapy offers additional support, such as: Accessing therapy when they are ill at home Attending a session if a child is at home sick Not having to pay for gas or travel expenses If a client is dealing with anxiety about leaving their home After some time, Marlee decided to develop her Canadian private practice into a group practice by listing her business on job platforms and hiring new clinicians. Since Marlee had some experience working previously in group private practices, she knew both what she wanted (a sense of community and professional respect and support amongst staff), and what she didn’t want (for burnt out to be rampant or the expected norm). Marlee’s tips for listeners Don’t operate from a scarcity mindset. The need for mental health is increasing, and there will always be people that require and seek help. So, know that your skills and your work will always be needed, you just need to show up, be authentic, and build the foundation of your business on your mission and values. Additionally, network! Build up your network as soon as you can. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 110: What to Consider when Setting Your Private Practice Rates | EP 110 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Learn more about Marlee on her website, LinkedIn profile, and practice website Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google...

Duration:00:45:03

What to Consider When Setting Your Private Practice Rates | Ep 110

2/14/2024
Are you having trouble deciding on a starting rate for your private practice? There are so many ways to figure out how to start off. For example, your college or association may have a recommendation, or basing your rate on what other therapists are charging in your area - but these guidelines may not be enough to allow you to be profitable! You may need to look at your budget to know where to set your rates in order to give your Canadian private practice the best shot at being successful. In this podcast episode, I talk you through a basic exercise that you can do to help you decide what your rate should be. In this Episode: Make it personal How to find your starting rate Final thoughts Make it personal You have to personalize your budget, and therefore your therapy rate. Sure, you can look at what other therapists in your area are charging to make sure that you’re not pricing yourself too high or too low, or you could check in with your associated college to see what they say. However, whatever advice you get, you need to tailor it to what your personal and professional needs are. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to budgeting; you’re going to have to understand your numbers and you’re going to understand your needs! It is a bit of a dance to figure out what to do in this situation, and I know because I’ve been there! If you want some more in-depth advice, you can download my free e-course or purchase my workbook. How to find your starting rate One of the main reasons why people start private practices is because they want work-life balance. So, let’s say: At a maximum that you want to see four people a day for five days a week, that’s 20 people per week You want to take four weeks of vacation You take 10 sick or personal days There are five holidays With these calculations, you’ll probably be working around 45 work weeks per year. Now, a common rate is $150 CAD, which I’ll use in this example. If you charge: $150 CAD x 20 clients, that is $3000 per week $3000 CAD x 45 weeks, that is a total of $135,000 This may seem like a lot of money, but you have to take income tax into account, as well as your business expenses. I recommended subtracting 50% right away for income tax and business expenses, and whatever is left is your bonus for the year. ‘But, for that 50%, it would go towards rent if you’re seeing people in person, your practice management software and I use Jane App for that - it’s fairly affordable, around $80 CAD a month … You may have hired VAs, clinical insurance, clinical supervision, accountants, website development … So many things that you have to pay for!’ - Julia Smith So, once you subtract this 50%, you could be left with $67,500 CAD. With retirement, it’s recommended that you put away 10-15%, and now you are left with a total of: $57,375.00 and divided by 12 months, that is $4,781.25 CAD. Final thoughts In Canada, $150 CAD may not be enough to charge for a session, but I know that it can be difficult to charge more. There are lots of factors to consider, but don’t lose hope! There is a sweet spot that you can find with your numbers when you start working with them. So, consider doing this exercise to get clarity about the rate that you would like to get to! Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources Mentioned and Useful Links: Ep 109: How to Build a Private Practice Website | EP 109 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Article: How to Set Up a Canadian Private Practice Website Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon, and TuneIn

Duration:00:09:43

How to Build a Private Practice Website | Ep 109

2/7/2024
As a Canadian therapist, one of the things that you know needs to get done is to build a website. It’s part of the deal of being a business owner, and having a great website is the cornerstone of being seen by your local community and getting your Canadian private practice noticed. I think everyone has one or two horror stories about trying to get everything up and running when you are launching your Canadian private practice, or your latest marketing campaign - I’ve had some as well! But a great website is necessary, and it’s not as impossible (or expensive) as you may have thought! I’ve partnered with an incredible company that offers you easy, affordable, and professional website packages. Depending on your needs, budget, and desires, there will be an option that fits your budget and business like a glove. Keep listening to be introduced! In this Episode: Re-building my website Choosing your website journey Meet Your New Website! Re-building my website Last year I decided to completely redo my website, perhaps you have an idea of how much work that can be! If you have ever been in this situation - or you are in this situation now, read on! WordPress websites are open-source, they offer design flexibility, and excellent SEO capabilities. On the other hand, website builders that create using their own proprietary platform (like Wix, Squarespace, Clinic Sites, and now Brighter Vision) make creating a website easy BUT there are limits to the design of your website and limits to SEO, because the websites are built on their private platform. Choosing your website journey I decided to switch from my previous website host to one that suited my preferences and needs, and I found an amazing Canadian company that ticked all the boxes! So, you may be thinking that instead you could build your own website. You might imagine that it would be cheaper, and that you could do it your own way. You could do that, but I would recommend you try something else! Because I tried to build my own website, it took almost 10 months, and it felt like a second job. Meet Your New Website! So if you don’t want to spend months working with a team to build your own website, doing edits, and paying thousands of dollars - I have found a solution for you! Before any confusion sets in; WordPress.org is where you can purchase your own hosting and develop your website. However, now there is a WordPress website that provides you with turn-key solutions; WordPress.com! So if you want to build it yourself in an easy way, they offer that function. However, if you don’t want to build it yourself, they do offer website design services - all you have to do is choose one of their monthly plans, choose a template that you love, and submit your content. And, if you want to transfer later and stop working with the company, you can switch your website to another WordPress hosting site! You can start with this company for 0 Canadian dollars! Or, I’d recommend starting with their Creator Plan, which is only $33 CAD a month, plus tax, which includes: Free domain for one year Premium website themes Unlimited Pages WordPress Plugins Live Chat Support Website Security Real Time Website Backups Website Performance Boosters To start building your private practice, click here and by next week you could have your website built! Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources Mentioned and Useful Links: Ep 108 Michael Sorsdahl: CCPA’s New Ethics Case bOok and Why You Must Read It | EP 108 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Article: How to Set Up a Canadian Private Practice Website Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon, and TuneIn

Duration:00:12:33

Michael Sorsdahl: Ccpa’s New Ethics Case Book and Why You Must Read It | Ep 108

1/31/2024
How knowledgeable are you on current counselling ethics? How regularly do you follow up on changes and fluctuations in ethics and the recommended practices as times go on? Where should you start? As we know how society and the general public changes over the years, it makes sense that the recommended counselling practices and ethics would too. What you might have learned five years ago, even two years ago, may have changed recently. Part of being a clear, conscientious, and responsible therapist is taking the time to keep up to date with current ethics. In this podcast episode, I talk with Michael who’s recently just finished co-authoring and editing the new CCPA revised ethics case book. MEET MICHAEL Michael Sorsdahl is a practicing psychologist in BC and Alberta, and is currently the ethics chair for the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association Ethics Complaints Division. Learn more about Michael on his practice website, LinkedIn and Psychology Today profiles. In this episode: Why the new ethics case book is important for counsellors The four sections of the book Ethics have to be current Multiple relationships Why the new ethics case book is important for counsellors This book is a complement to the standard ethics of practice that the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA) created. This ethics case book that Michael and his team have developed is focused on bringing to life our code of ethics and standards of practice that are new. Although there are best practices and recommendations that are more in alignment in the codes based on historical precedence, there is more no “this is the only way” to do something, and that’s what this book is teaching. The four sections of the book 1 - Foundational aspect The history of ethics and how it evolved The legal intersectionality of ethics and society That ethics isn’t directed by law but is influenced by law 2 - Sections of the codes The sections that each code falls under which is represented by different chapters in the book Historical elements of the codes and the societal considerations to be aware of Any pitfalls that counsellors could be mindful of 3 - Complex cases studies without solutions Complex case studies that you or your students could practice with in any case Work on your own problem-solving skills for these Michael’s team are going to work on putting a team together to solve these and put the solutions forward to the CCPA 4 - The solutions to the case studies There are solutions in a separate chapter so that the case studies can be studied by students without spotting the answers on the same page Ethics have to be current Ethics will naturally evolve with time because it is the study and practice of handling people and situations correctly, and people are constantly changing too. As a responsible and compassionate counsellor, it is part of your job to know how the lines shift, change, or blur and how to navigate those changes effectively. Read more about the new CCPA ethics book at this link. Multiple relationships The ethics of multiple relationships between counsellors and clients can often be brought into discussion, especially when offering therapy in small towns or rural areas. For example, someone may be the therapist of their pharmacist! Which is of course a nuanced situation to navigate. If you are in a situation where you have multiple relationships, you need to take notes. Have clear boundaries and capture records of your choices. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 107: Ester Chu and Richard Tatomir: Working As a Team to help Canadian Therapists | EP 107 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Learn more about Michael on his practice website, LinkedIn and ...

Duration:00:39:17

Esther Chu & Richard Tatomir: Working as a Team to Help Canadian Therapists | Ep 107

1/24/2024
We all know that working as a therapist can be a lonely job. When we work together, we can help one another reach higher heights in our Canadian practices, grow as professionals, and share the success with more people. This is what Richard and Esther have found on their journey so far. Richard hired Esther as an administrative assistant in the early months of 2020 as his solo practice was full, and together they have developed a thriving practice, and even started a Collective to help therapists do the same. In this podcast episode, I chat with the both of them about their journey, the work that they do, and to show the value of professional partnership and the rewards it can offer. MEET ESTHER AND RICHARD Esther is a therapist and the owner of Sandigan Wellness. She also is the practice manager at Relationship Experts Vancouver (a group private practice) where she’s responsible for establishing and maintaining the community culture, operations, and seeking out opportunities for clinicians to gain experience in areas they wish to grow in. And Richard is a Practitioner-Instructor, Clinical Supervisor, and PhD student at Simon Fraser University. He is the President of the BC Chapter of the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association; Speaker and Consultant to organizations, professionals, and the public, and founded Relationship Experts Vancouver. Learn more about Esther on her Psychology Today profile, her website, and the practice website Learn more about Richard on his LinkedIn, the practice website, and his Psychology Today profile In this episode: How Esther and Richard came to work together The benefits of working in a team The Collective program How Esther and Richard came to work together For Richard, who was looking for help and ended up hiring Esther as an admin virtual assistant, he was working as a solo practitioner and getting full, even before COVID. To hire Esther, Richard was trusting his gut and hired her also due to the fact that Esther’s interests and skill aligned with the role that he was searching for someone to fill. The benefits of working in a team For both Esther and Richard, working in a team offers both of them so many benefits. Esther sees a few clients now as well and works alongside Richard. However, since Esther has taken over most of the practice management roles, Richard as the owner is now working more on the business instead of in the business. The Collective program When Richard and Esther decided to create the collective space, they wanted it to be a place where counsellors could gain access to supervision, referrals and community. Like Fearless practice, they also hope to help launch counsellors into private practice so that they don’t have to settle for a position that does not pay well. ‘So, people that are wanting to develop their own private practices and their own brands … We have created this start-up accelerator, membership community model, where I know the cost of supervision is going to be covered, the other basic costs are going to be covered, and if they really like it … They’re inviting their friends who could also potentially become members.’ - Richard Tatomir Even though the collective has an open policy, they are still selective of who they invite into groups because they want to make sure that the people who are working together are properly aligned. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 106: A Dr. Chandra Ashton: Working in a Canadian Not-for-Profit and Enjoying It! | EP 106 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Learn more about Esther on her Psychology Today profile, her website, and the practice website Learn more about Richard on his LinkedIn, the practice website, and his Psychology Today profile Rate, review,...

Duration:00:42:39

Dr. Chandra Ashton: Working In a Canadian Not-For-Profit and Enjoying It! | Ep 106

1/17/2024
Have you worked in a not-for-profit organization before? Do you tend to steer clear from not-for-profit counselling positions due to common bad stories from what it could be like? So many therapists go into therapy because they feel a need and a desire to support and serve their communities. However, it can become tough, expensive, and challenging - but this is not the case across the board! If you’re lucky, you can find Canadian not-for-profit practices that are aligned with your values, and you can see clients and do work that feels fulfilling to you. In this podcast episode, I chat with Dr. Ashton about her experience running her own solo private practice while working full-time for a not-for-profit practice. MEET CHANDRA Dr. Ashton has worked as a therapist and parent coach in private practice and not-for-profit settings, and through contracted service for various agencies. She values creating a culturally safe and self-empowering practice. She has found her greatest joy when adapting mainstream interventions in creative ways to best walk alongside marginalized and underserved populations. Learn more about Dr. Ashton and connect with her on her website or via her email address In this episode: Be intentional about working as a therapist Working in a not-for-profit practice Handling work without burning out Pros and cons of being a not-for-profit therapist Be intentional about working as a therapist For Dr. Ashton, her journey into Canadian private practice has been deeply informed by her desire to be aware of her position, ancestry, the land that she occupies, and how she wants to serve and assist her community. Working in a not-for-profit practice Dr. Ashton had gone through an 11-year journey in working through agencies and other private practices before being hired as a full-time therapist at Terra Centre in Edmonton. When Dr. Ashton first started working through an agency in private practice, she started in a not-for-profit. However, once she started doing her P.h.D and had children, she knew that she needed to start looking out for her family by finding work that was more reliable. Handling work without burning out Working as a therapist can be incredibly taxing as it is rewarding, and you need to have strong boundaries in place with yourself and others so that you don’t lose yourself in the lives of others, or bring work home with you. However, if you like what you do and you enjoy the work - besides the few very tough days here and there - it is easier not to burn out. Pros and cons of being a not-for-profit therapist For Dr. Ashton, working in her private practice means building a working relationship with her clients where she knows that they are receiving what they need and she is able to structure her job in the way that she wants to do it. Sometimes when you work for another practice, you may have to: Limit how many sessions you can have with a client Stick to the modality that they want you to use so you cannot always change or adapt your therapeutic approach Deal with burnout from having to work a job that you haven’t structured yourself Having that autonomy over your work is invaluable. Even though Dr. Ashton has a small pay cut for her work in the not-for-profit practice, she feels that she gains so much because the work that she is doing feels important, sustainable, and appreciated by her clients and community. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 105: Ashley Schofield-McEachern: Transitioning from Nursing into Therapy | EP 105 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Learn more about Dr. Ashton and connect with her on her website or via her email address Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon, and...

Duration:00:51:47

Ashley Schofield-McEachern: Transitioning From Nursing Into Therapy | Ep 105

1/10/2024
Many of the skills that you learn from all your experience throughout your mental health career can be brought into the session room with a client - when done ethically and when asked for! Ashley worked as a nurse for many years in public health before deciding to return to university to get her masters, and move into Canadian private practice. She now uses both psychotherapy and nursing skills in private practice! In this podcast episode, Ashley and I discuss her journey into Canadian private practice, as well as how she works with clients, offering walk and talk therapy, and how she brings in all her expertise in a way that allows her to do her best work with her clients. MEET ASHLEY Ashley is a Registered Nurse and Registered Psychotherapist (Qualifying) in Ontario, Canada, and Certified Perinatal Mental Health Professional. She owns a private practice, Whispering Pines Counselling & Wellness, dedicated to women’s health and wellness. Ashley's mission is to help women feel empowered to prioritize their wellbeing, know their worth, and live unapologetically. Learn more about Ashley on her practice website, Instagram, or LinkTree page. In this episode: From nursing to therapy Going into private practice Dual licenses Offering walk and talk therapy Ashley’s advice to listeners From nursing to therapy Ashley had worked as a nurse in public health, and during the last five years, she started doing home visits with clients, which encouraged her to return to university to learn how to become a therapist. As Ashley explains, in nursing school they are taught a baseline of counselling skills in all areas to prepare them. But to help people more professionally and effectively, Ashley knew that she needed - and wanted - to get a further education. Going into private practice Although Ashley left public health in 2021, she had already started working on her masters degree in 2020. At the end of 2022, Ashley completed her masters, and started in private practice in April of that year. She recently signed up with a local university to be a part-time clinical instructor. Dual licenses Because Ashley is a licensed nurse and psychotherapist, she can draw on both professions and experiences to help clients. For her clients, they charge their insurance for her psychotherapy and then add in elements of nursing, if any was given or was applicable. During sessions, Ashley will inform her clients that she’s “putting on her nurse hat” when wanting to discuss certain questions. Offering walk and talk therapy From June 2023, Ashley started offering walk and talk therapy services to her clients, and it’s been successful so far! The trails that they take are often more private, so they know that the sessions can be conducted without much interference from others. Ashley has structured her online booking with Jane App so that her clients can easily contact her and mention for which service they would like to see her through, whether that’s virtual or for a walk and talk session. Her official office space opens up in early January so that she can begin seeing clients in-person. To save on expenses, Ashley is sharing the office space with a massage therapist. Ashley’s advice to listeners Listen to your heart and your gut, because sometimes your head can turn you into a different direction due to fear or nervousness. The whole point of private practice is doing what you want to do, and making it work for you! Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 104: Angela Bishop: Build Your Career in Canadian Private Practice | EP 104 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Learn more about Ashley on her practice website, Instagram, or LinkTree page. Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts,...

Duration:00:37:55

Angela Bishop: Build Your Career in Canadian Private Practice | Ep 104

1/3/2024
What works for you one day, one year, or one decade may not stay the same. As you change and develop as a person, so will your needs, and what you need from your environment to feel supported and to offer your best work. In this podcast episode, I talk with Angela who used to have zero interest in running a Canadian private practice but who is now on track to hit her second year of being a solo practitioner! We discuss how she got into therapy, the challenges she faced, and how she is overcoming them. MEET ANGELA Angela is a Registered Social Worker and perinatal mental health provider, specializing in maternal mental health and all things parenthood. She has a wealth of experience in helping individuals move through transitions, worries, low mood and general day to day struggles. She opened up her own private therapy practice "Bloom & Thrive Therapy" in 2022 where she has a strong focus on Perinatal Mental Health. Learn more about Angela on her practice website, Psychology Today, and LinkedIn profiles. In this episode: Recognizing and honouring the desire to change Becoming a therapist Creating a job that you like doing Offering in-person and virtual therapy Networking with fellow therapists Recognizing and honouring the desire to change Angela got her Masters of Social Work in 2008. She worked for a counselling agency for a short period of time before getting a long term job at a hospital where she worked for 14 years. Then, when Angela had her second child in 2021 and went on maternity leave, she felt that she was ready for something new in her professional life. Becoming a therapist Angela extended her maternity leave and began dipping her toes into private practice by working as an associate. In January 2022, Angela started learning more about private practice. By March she was working as an associate, and then registered her own practice in May 2022. Creating a job that you like doing Angela describes the things that she misses from working in the hospital, such as: Bouncing ideas off of other clinicians Chatting with other medical staff to better understand a diagnosis The community of working as a team All these aspects can be implemented into a private practice over time. There are ways to create the job that you enjoy working and want to do because, even though there are benefits to contract work, there are downsides too. Starting up a private practice gave Angela the opportunity to create a work environment where she could have a professional career that wasn’t intruded on my politics or issues from a contract or agency job. Offering in-person and virtual therapy Nowadays, people are used to virtual therapy and are okay with it. It can be expensive to have an in-person space and to rent an office to use for therapy, however, Angela knew that she wanted to invest in one. Offering in-person therapy has become a great way for new clients to first meet Angela and get to know her before moving to virtual therapy. Networking with fellow therapists Angela shares an office space with another therapist who she used to work with back at the hospital. They see different client groups and can refer to one another. Having this type of small camaraderie is incredibly useful and supportive for therapists, to help one another out and to share the load, since it can feel lonely from time to time. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 103: Why Taking Breaks is Important in Private Practice | EP 103 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Learn more about Angela on her practice website, Psychology Today, and LinkedIn profiles. Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon, and TuneIn

Duration:00:37:50

Why Taking Breaks Is Important in Private Practice | Ep 103

12/13/2023
Do you often let fear stop you from taking a break and resting when you know you need it? Are you often pushing yourself beyond your limits but haven’t stopped to wonder why? Have you been feeling resentful towards work that you used to enjoy in the past? Taking the time to properly rest is something that can help you to feel more present with your clients during sessions, and to enjoy what you do. Resting allows you to tap into your creative energy and appreciate your daily tasks, as well as your needs, instead of only chasing deadlines. In this podcast episode, I share my history with overcoming the fear when I know I need to settle down for some time. In this Episode: Why I started private practice Signs I need a break Being Fearless Going forward Why I started private practice One of the reasons why I started my own Canadian private practice was because I was getting burned out and I knew that for me to be successful I would need to have more breaks. However, even when I got to that place, I found myself struggling to give myself the chance to rest and take breaks because I felt I: Needed to push myself. I didn’t feel like I could ever fully “earn” my rest because in our modern capitalist society, we’re taught that time means money, so resting could feel like losing money Had to continuously earn an income because, another symptom of a largely capitalist society, hustle culture is so ingrained in our world that not actively doing something insinuates that you are not driven Could lose out on working with new clients if I wasn’t always available because I decided to take a break So, during this first year of trying to take more breaks, I had to focus on listening to myself and what my body and mind were telling me when I knew that I needed to take breaks, even if I had fear. Signs I need a break I’ve come to notice personal signs of when I need to have a break, because I don’t want to wake up dreading work. I enjoy what I do, but if I don’t give myself time to rest, then that joy could turn into resentment or frustration, and I don’t want it to. I know that I need to step back when I: Heave a big sigh of having to do any admin, marketing, or tasks for my practice Feel more anxious or panicky Become overwhelmed or easily stressed out by emails and additional requests This approach to my work has drastically helped me to reduce that “ugh” feeling toward my work, and keep the burnout at bay. If you are interested in trying out a 50/ 50 workweek split, you can listen to my podcast episode about it here. Being Fearless After seven years of private practice and getting to know myself in this setting, I can no longer imagine working like how I used to! Now, I have a deeper understanding of what it means to be a “fearless” practitioner! It can mean saying “yes” to things that can feel scary and knowing when to push yourself, but at the same time also knowing when to say “no” and focus on self-care. Going forward In saying this, I’m going on a two-week hiatus for December! I’m going to unwind, enjoy the holiday season, and I’ll return back in January for another awesome year of the Fearless Practice Podcast! Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources Mentioned and Useful Links: Ep 102: Nicole Lobo: Turning Lemons into Lemonade in Private Practice | EP 102 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Article: How to Set Up a Canadian Private Practice Website Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon, and TuneIn

Duration:00:13:22

Nicole Lobo: Turning Lemons Into Lemonade in Private Practice | Ep 102

12/6/2023
If you had a tough experience as a counselling intern, you might feel inspired to create a space where future interns could have a different experience. It’s sometimes a healing response to turn the lemons of the past into the lemonade of the present, and that’s exactly what Nicole did. From her practicum, Nicole had a very challenging experience as a counselling intern in a private practice, and vowed to do things differently once she was able to open her own practice. MEET NICOLE Nicole is a Registered Psychotherapist of 5 years, Clinical Supervisor and founder of Be Well Therapy Studio; a boutique private practice operating in Ontario. Nicole’s goal is to make coming to therapy something to look forward to. She values authenticity, transparency, and a person-centred approach to care that aims to neutralize the stigma of accessing mental health care. Learn more about Nicole on her website, LinkedIn and Instagram profiles. In this episode: Nicole’s journey into psychotherapy Learning from past experiences going forward Nicole’s success of getting busy in her practice Discounted therapy with interns Offering monthly texting subscriptions Nicole’s advice to listeners Nicole’s journey into psychotherapy In college, Nicole already had a passion for psychology. Nicole made sure to keep a finger on the pulse of what therapy would be like to stay in contact and conversation with her professors. In her fourth year, she took part in an experiential learning course that was offered by her college. Learning from past experiences going forward During her masters, Nicole completed her counselling practicum in a private practice setting to gain experience in the field. However, the private practice offered free therapy which was great for making it accessible to the community, but she was exposed to communities of people that had a desperate need for mental health which she felt underprepared to provide for. After Nicole’s counselling practicum was completed and while she was working full-time at a local hospital, she opened her own small private practice part-time. Nicole’s success of getting busy in her practice One of the things that Nicole did was to prioritize slow organic growth. She started her practice as a side-job about two and half years before the pandemic started while working full-time in a hospital, so these pre-COVID years helped her to have an idea of the busy seasons in private practice versus slow seasons. Discounted therapy with interns Due to Nicole’s difficult entry into private practice when she was a new student and completing her practicum, it was important to her to create a space where she could rectify that issue for others. She offers this in her practice so that she knows she is providing new therapists with the guidance and support that she didn’t have when she started. Offering monthly texting subscriptions Nicole works hard to creatively meet the needs of the client, depending on where they are at. This service developed into Nicole’s idea for offering her clients a monthly text subscription which allows a client a way to connect with their therapists between sessions. Nicole is part of the College of Registered Psychotherapists of Ontario, and she made sure to read through their standards of practice and technological access standards to make sure that she was on the right side of the regulatory framework. Nicole’s advice to listeners Take it slow. Follow your interests, and gently get out of your comfort zone! Take learning risks and expose yourself to new areas of work so when you really invest your time and energy into an area of work you know that it’s what you want to do. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 101: Olivia Grigg: How to Host a Wellness Retreat | EP 101 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private...

Duration:00:43:47

Olivia Grigg: How to Host a Wellness Retreat | Ep 101

11/29/2023
Which skills do you have that could be carried over into your private practice? Today’s guest Olivia Grigg, who works as a therapist, used to spend her summers running camps, and now she hosts successful wellness retreats! If there is something that you would like to do, whether start a podcast, create an e-course, or even host and launch a retreat, these options are all possible for you. Even if you love counselling but you still feel like there’s something else out there that you want to combine with your standard hours in session, you can find it, and make it happen. In this podcast episode, Olivia and I talk about her journey from working in another group practice to starting her own Canadian practice, and hosting wellness retreats that keep getting full! MEET OLIVIA Olivia is an RSW in London, Ontario. She has three young kids who keep her busy. Olivia supports clients 1:1 as well as hosting wellness retreats regularly throughout the year. Olivia focuses on somatic approaches as well as inner child and self compassion strategies to help clients move towards self trust. Learn more about Olivia on her website, Psychology Today, and Instagram profiles. In this episode: Why Olivia started a private practice Hosting retreats Retreats could help you get clients Advertising retreats Handling insurance Why Olivia started a private practice Before starting her own practice, Olivia was working at another group practice offering one-on-one counselling. Although Olivia enjoyed her time at the group practice where she previously worked, she felt a strong pull to expand on her own desires and skills as a therapist. For her and her journey, it made sense for her at that point to continue the journey on her own. Olivia knew that she wanted to spend more time with clients that were going through a religious transformation or deconstruction, or had a desire to reconnect with their faith in a new way, but these weren’t the clients that she could see while working at the other group practice. Hosting retreats Since Olivia has had experience in both improvising through handling big groups of people - and from playing music - she felt comfortable organizing and leading a wellness retreat. Even though there are some differences, the similarities are far more and far greater. Retreats could help you get clients For some of Olivia’s clients, they often come to her retreats first before signing on as an official client since it allows them to indirectly work with her and experience her counselling before making the commitment. Of course, not all participants are looking for a therapist, but some do, and so retreats could function like a soft-meeting. Advertising retreats In terms of advertising the retreats that Olivia hosts, she usually uses: Instagram as her main platform Her website Her network of therapists in the community to pass the information onto their clients, but often the therapists themselves join the retreats too! Since retreats are becoming more popular and people are more familiar with what they are, the need has adjusted and grown. So, Olivia often finds clients and participants relatively easy. She’s hosted retreats as small as five to as large as 20. Handling insurance Even though insurance is not as big of an issue as you might think, it is still advised to purchase top-quality insurance, like Olivia does, for her retreats. For herself and her brand, she purchases high-quality liability insurance so that in case an accident does occur, her business won’t suffer for it. For anyone who is looking to host retreats, get advice that will suit what you want to do. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 100: What I’ve Learned about Podcasting | EP 100 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one...

Duration:00:29:25

What I’ve Learned About Podcasting | Ep 100

11/22/2023
100 episodes! What a milestone. In the beginning, I really wasn’t sure what would happen. I knew that I wanted to try podcasting but I had no idea what to expect. However, once I knew that it would be something I would enjoy and that it would be a great way to connect with you, I committed, and here we are two years later! In this episode, I talk about the whole experience from the start to the present moment. I share my learning curves, my process, and any tips for you - if you are thinking about doing this too. Thanks for joining me on this journey, and here’s to another year of the Fearless Practice podcast! In this Episode: Why I started this podcast Creating the podcast The pros and cons Lessons I have learned Why I started this podcast There were many reasons why I was considering doing this podcast: Would it help my consulting business? Would I enjoy recording every single week? Finding other like-minded therapists to connect and talk with Creating the podcast Once I experimented a little, I knew that I was ready to give it a try! So I: Took a course in podcasting Decided on the intro music Found a sound editor Hired a designer for the podcast cards Hired a copywriter to write show notes In many ways, running this podcast is like a second job. In order for me to publish the podcast episodes that you listen to each Wednesday, the process looks a little like this: Brainstorming the idea for each episode Finding counsellors to interview Organizing points for each topic per episode Recording the podcast either as a solo show or in an interview Sending the the sound editor the audio Listening to the podcast myself to make my own edits Sending the audio to the copywriter for the the show notes to be written Editing the show notes myself Sending quotes and titles to my designer for the cards for the episode Having the social media manager create posts for the podcast Sending the final products to my editor to schedule it for publishing The pros and cons When I started this podcast I thought it would take maybe an hour or two a week, but as you can see, it’s a much longer process! Despite the long hours and financial investment, I’m so glad that I also get the chance to meet so many great Canadian therapists! And I’m grateful to those who have invested in my work and purchased from my store. Lessons I have learned Some of the things I now know about podcasting are that: It really helps to have a great team around you You will need to put in effort and energy to make it great It’s going to be an investment so make sure you have money saved up or coming in so that you can make it work You can create community through a podcast, and it’s a wonderful way to connect with other therapists in your area! On the note of community, I want to know how I can help you so that I can keep creating content that serves your needs. Reach out to us with your suggestions! Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources Mentioned and Useful Links: Ep 99: Christine Olsen: How to Settle into Your Niche with Confidence | EP 99 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Article: How to Set Up a Canadian Private Practice Website Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) From the very first episode, I've trusted East Coast Studio to help ensure my podcast sounds great. They'll help you streamline the podcasting process so you can focus on running your practice. Schedule a no-pressure conversation with East Coast Studio today and save $50 off their Podcast Pro Trial by using code FEARLESS at checkout!

Duration:00:15:52

Christine Olsen: How to Settle Into Your Niche With Confidence | Ep 99

11/15/2023
Has your road to private practice been rocky? Do you struggle with settling into your niche because you feel like you have to be applicable to every person? Do you feel that you need to add more specialities to be more complementary? There are so many different types of niches, and so many people that are looking for help. You may feel like you have to see them all and maybe you want to help them all, but being a one-size-fits-all therapist might leave you feeling burned out and clients not sure if you truly understand their needs. Don’t be afraid to niche down, and be clear on who you serve and what you serve them with. This can make you a more attractive therapist, because it shows clients that you see them, and that you know how to help. In this podcast episode, Christine and I discuss her entry into Canadian private practice, as well as the importance of niching down - and sticking to it. Her advice is this; don’t try to be good at everything! Listen in to find out more. MEET CHRISTINE Christine Olsen is a Registered Social Worker and Psychotherapist from Thunder Bay, ON. Christine specializes in therapy for men and anger management. She provides online therapy for those in the province of Ontario. Learn more about Christine on her website, Open Path and Psychology Today profile. In this episode: Why Christine decided to become a Social Worker Getting into private practice Christine’s niche of working with men in therapy Experimenting with effective marketing strategies Doing a four-day work week Open Path Christine’s advice to listeners Why Christine decided to become a Social Worker Christine felt a draw to working with people. In the midst of feeling uncertain about what she wanted to do as a profession, she drew on what she knew her likes and dislikes were, and that guided her to wanting to work with people and become a social worker. And not only that, but because Christine was an empathetic child, she knew that she wanted to see how the world looks different to each person due to their realities. Getting into private practice Initially, Christine only thought that she would start a private practice toward the end of her career. She felt that it needed so much experience to do well, and so she thought that she had to have more years under her belt - even though she already had 10! However, due to changing circumstances in her life, Christine decided to give it a shot earlier than she had initially anticipated. Christine couldn’t find daycare for her child and her previous job didn’t offer her flexibility, so she decided to take the financial hit and jump straight into a private practice instead of scrambling for another job in a difficult work environment. It was tough, but she made it work! Christine’s niche of working with men in therapy It felt natural and easier for her to work with men in therapy. She had experience working with men who experience irritability and anger and enjoyed that work. Outdated societal expectations can make it difficult for male individuals to seek out therapy willingly, and it can cause their struggles or pain to intensify, which can lead to damage and suffering in their relationships. Experimenting with effective marketing strategies First and foremost, Christine set up a website for her Canadian private practice. She markets only in Ontario. She uses search engine optimization (SEO) for both Ontario and Thunder Bay, including online therapy, and therapy for men. Her marketing goal right now is to show up more on Google, so Christine prioritizes her writing, especially since she’s done it over the last couple of years, so it does go faster. She writes what flows to her on a day-to-day basis, relating to her niche, and makes it something that she enjoys. Doing a four-day work week After her previous years of working experience, Christine knew that she wanted to make a shift in her life. She wanted to structure her work life around her personal life so that...

Duration:00:41:44

Why You Shouldn’t Start a Private Practice | Ep 98

11/8/2023
Even though you might be hearing about how private practices are all the rage, it is still a choice of preference. Owning and running a private practice may not be well-suited to you, or your goals for your work, and that’s okay. Your work in the mental health industry does not need to look the same as others. If you haven’t felt a pull to start a private practice but you can’t pinpoint why, or if you think you’d like to try one but you’re not sure if it will suit you, then listen in on this episode. In this Episode: Not being properly certified or licensed Needing full income immediately Don’t want to work alone If you don’t feel confident in your skills If you have a low stress tolerance Lacking motivation Being disorganized Not being properly certified or licensed You need to have your correct paperwork in order and filed properly before you ethically begin a private practice. If you open one without it, you risk legal damages and/or providing a service that you are not capable of doing (which could harm clients). Needing full income immediately One of the most common aspects of owning and running a private practice is that it can take a while for it to become profitable. If you are strapped for cash or you need stable and reliable income, then starting a private practice won’t be a great plan for you. Don’t want to work alone Running a private practice can be a lonely experience. For the first few months or years it is often just you behind the desk, or in sessions with clients, and it can be rare for you to work in close quarters with another counsellor. Many private practice owners actually seek out memberships or communities to join if they yearn for some professional friendships or connection. If you don’t feel confident in your skills If you don’t yet feel confident in your skills as a therapist, hold off on starting a practice until you have reached a more capable level. Consider taking extra time to do more coursework, study with other great therapists, and get certifications so that you can feel more confident to provide effective and wonderful therapy. If you have a low stress tolerance Starting a private practice is stressful! There are many changing and unexpected variables that can throw you off course, as well as the fact that there are lots of responsibilities that will sit squarely on your shoulders. I recommend hiring a consultant if you struggle with managing stress but you are excited to start a private practice. Lacking motivation If you lack motivation, it will feel like a constant uphill battle to keep working on your private practice. Rome was not built in a day, and neither are private practices! Are you excited about the journey ahead of you, despite the challenges that you will surely face? If you are not in love with this idea, then wait a bit. Don’t start something that you are dreading doing even before it’s been launched. Being disorganized There are so many things that you need to do when you run a private practice, especially as a solo owner! However, there are ways to get around this! Speak to a consultant about the basics of organizing and running a private practice to manage it with great systems. Consider outsourcing tasks to people as well, so that everything doesn’t sit on your plate. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources Mentioned and Useful Links: Ep 97: Overcoming Sudden Obstacles in My Private Practice: Year Seven | EP 97 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Article: How to Set Up a Canadian Private Practice Website Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon, and TuneIn

Duration:00:13:05

Overcoming Sudden Obstacles in My Private Practice: Year Seven | Ep 97

11/1/2023
We all have intentions for the new year when it begins, and ideas of what we’d like to do differently or in a new way. And it’s often the case that things don’t go as planned! However, it can be part of the overall process, and in the end new lessons are learned and new skills are acquired. At the beginning of my seventh year in Canadian private practice, I had a vision for the year and how I wanted it to go. Of course, it wasn’t what I expected, but now I have better systems, a strong team, and new strategies for handling stress and the unexpected. In this podcast episode, I recount my year, what I went through, and how I ended up feeling more confident and ready for what will come my way. In this Episode: The aim to slow down Expanding my team Completing the trilogy A sudden website change Another year of Sponsorship! The aim to slow down Almost every week, month, and year I remind myself why I started my Canadian private practice, which is to have more freedom and autonomy over my time, counsel clients with therapeutic approaches that I value, and to not get burnt out. It’s easy for life to get busy and for the schedule to get full before you know it, and so one of my commitments for this past year was to be more intentional with my time. Expanding my team During this past year, I launched a podcast series for my private practice with my associate, and even though it was a great experience, it took a huge amount of effort to manage, structure, and launch. I also ended up hiring a social media manager to help me handle social media for both my private practice and consulting business, and it turned out to be a great choice to have made! Completing the trilogy In the new year (at the beginning of 2023) I was feeling refreshed and excited to work on a project that I had been looking forward to, which was to complete the third installment of my trilogy for the private practice start-up package. This last piece was communication scripts. For me, it was a big learning curve to figure out what to say to clients when they enquired about certain aspects of my services and what I offered or didn’t. I wanted to share my knowledge with my audience, because I knew that my scripts could help them too. A sudden website change Just as I thought that I could slow down after finishing these few projects, I had to scramble for a new plan because the website hosting company I used was changing. If you want the full details, you can listen to this podcast episode. I wanted to update my website, but I wouldn’t have been able to since Brighter Vision would have moved my website to their proprietary platform and out of WordPress, and I didn't want to do that because I wanted to own my website even if I chose to no longer work with Brighter Vision. Another year of Sponsorship! Despite the challenges of the year, it has turned out to be great. I’ve learned, grown, and changed in ways that I’m grateful for. And better yet, I’m so glad that Jane App and I will be working together for another year as my official podcast sponsor! If you are looking for a great EMR, I highly recommend Jane App. Click this link and use the promo code FEARLESS to receive a grace period! Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources Mentioned and Useful Links: Ep 96: Shannon Smith: Starting a Second Career as a Therapist | Ep 96 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Article: How to Set Up a Canadian Private Practice Website Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon, and TuneIn

Duration:00:18:27

Shannon Smith: Starting a Second Career as a Therapist | Ep 96

10/25/2023
How do counsellors get into the profession? Have you had an idea hanging around your thoughts for the last couple of years about trying something new? Has your mindset held you back from attempting to create some of your new dreams or ambitions? It takes courage for a person to try something new. But education, finances, family, time and so much more can also get in the way of starting. This means it could be years before beginning to build your dream Canadian private practice. In this podcast episode, Shannon and I talk about her process of opening up her Canadian private practice piece by piece, day by day, and step by step. Starting a practice doesn’t have to feel so far away when you allow yourself to try, and to start small. Join us and be inspired! MEET SHANNON Shannon Smith is a Registered Counselling Therapist (candidate) and a certified Intuitive Eating Counsellor. Her background is mental health nursing; she worked in Halifax’s Eating Disorder Program for 15 years. Shannon believes when we lose sight of who we are, several common issues can arise, including anxiety, disordered eating, and negative body image. She works with clients who want to feel more comfortable in their own skin, and more connected to themselves and others. Learn more about Shannon on her website and Instagram page. In this episode: Doing an MA during the pandemic Launching a private practice Using social media wisely Doing in-person versus online Setting rates that align Shannon’s advice for listeners Doing an MA during the pandemic In August 2020, Shannon began looking into various masters programs to become a therapist. The program that she ended up choosing had its deadline within that week, so she spent a couple of days rushing to get everything ready to apply to begin that September. She studied online for most of her degree and completed her practicum in person over the last eight months. Launching a private practice On March 1st Shannon opened her Canadian private practice, on March 2nd she had her first client, and on March 3rd her second client, and it slowly continued to steadily grow from there on out. Shannon has noticed that the majority of her clients are coming in through her website, through her previous connections from her years working in the eating disorder field, and also through Instagram. Using social media wisely Because so many people use social media daily, it is a great tool for businesses to use to connect with their ideal clients because the digital world has become like another marketplace for sharing and finding information. However, it can be a taxing environment, both for a person’s mental health and energy, and also for counsellors that try to find the right ways to market themselves and their practices ethically. Doing in-person versus online Shannon chooses to only do online virtual therapy with her clients. She works on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. She has young children that she wants to take to and from school, be around for, and also make time for her personal hobbies and routines. Setting rates that align Setting rates is a common struggle amongst counselors and workers in the mental health field. One of my podcast episodes goes over how to ethically set and raise rates for new and current clients, and you can get the full information there. However, consider setting your rates in a way that allows you to be financially taken care of and consider offering Open Path services for clients that require some additional financial assistance or donating to mental health organizations each year. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 95: Shelly Qualtieri: Using Lifelong Experience in a New Private Practice | EP 95 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month...

Duration:00:40:47

Shelly Qualtieri: Using Lifelong Experience in a New Private Practice | Ep 95

10/18/2023
Do you have a wide and varied range of experience from your years in the helping profession? How can you bring these skills and life experiences together into a Canadian private practice that you can run as your own boss? Are you worried about walking the right path? You can always learn how to incorporate your mental health field experience! Your years working as a student, abroad, or part-time can all lead you to the path that you want to be on. With intention and passion, you will create a life that feels right for you when you take the action to create it. In this podcast episode, Shelly and I discuss how she came to start her own private practice after 30+ years of working in and around the helping profession. She trusted the path and followed her heart, and it brought her to a place where she enjoys doing her daily work. MEET SHELLY Shelly is the owner of Shelly Qualtieri & Associates Counselling & Coaching. Her goal is to create a safe and supportive space for teens and adults to feel a little lighter after each session, empowered and more in control of their life - with understanding the root cause of the challenges while providing practical tools and strategies to implement in their lives. Learn more about Shelly on her website, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Psychology Today profiles. In this episode: How Shelly became a social worker Taking the leap to start a private practice Building up the business Julia’s tips for filling up your associates’ schedules Shelly’s advice to private practitioners How Shelly became a social worker In university, Shelly started out working on a sociology degree and by her third year, she was working full-time nights and volunteering for seven years. Shelly then worked and studied for some time in Australia before moving back to Canada, working with people that struggled with severe mental illness in relation to addiction. After working for universities, Shelly then spent five years working with domestic violence victims and survivors. And finally, Shelly has now opened her own practice! Taking the leap to start a private practice Shelly had struggled with a challenging manager, and she got to a point where she knew that she needed a change. Once she decided to quit and do something different, Shelly reconnected with a friend that had been working in private practice as a side hustle for years before recently going full-time, and she felt ready to do the same. Within 14 months, Shelly had a full-time schedule and was working out of an office. Building up the business Shelly has been able to learn the entrepreneurial skills that it takes to start, run, and maintain a successful Canadian private practice. Shelly’s assistant was the first person that was a part of her team, and it was a huge help for her. Additionally, this is where she also learned about the importance of having great systems. Julia’s tips for filling up your associates’ schedules If you can, avoid naming your practice after yourself. Consider finding a name that is not identifiable completely to you. Once you separate your name from your practice name, referrals that come through would most likely be more open to seeing your associates, since your name is not the business name. Shelly’s advice to private practitioners Ask lots and lots and lots of questions! Especially those that you look up to and know have had experience in the field that you are entering into. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 94: Get Free Consultations for Your Private Practice! | EP 94 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Learn more about Shelly on her website, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Psychology Today profiles. Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, ...

Duration:00:45:31

Get Free Consultations for Your Private Practice! | Ep 94

10/11/2023
Do you ever feel a call to reorganize, restructure, and get things back in order when a new season begins? Is your mind feeling refreshed and full of ideas after your summer break to relax? It’s officially fall, and these beginnings can sometimes provide you with a great opportunity to begin afresh, anew, or something different, and get to working on these ideas that you’ve been developing. But I know that money can sometimes be a little sparse after the summer holidays - I’ve been there myself! That’s why I want to offer my audience the opportunity to have a free consultation with me, as well as a chance to win a grant that can change the trajectory of your private practice, because I want to help you create a strong, profitable practice that fits with your values and serves your community. Listen to the episode to find out how! In this Episode: How to do more with less Apply for the Canada’s Digital Adoption program What to do if you don’t qualify? How to do more with less Even though you may be feeling inspired and refreshed after some holiday time over the summer, and you’re entering into fall season with a renewed sense of purpose and passion for your private practice, finances can be tight - especially after the vacation season. This can make it tough to put your new ideas, aspirations, or dreams into action for your private practice. How can you make things work if you have fewer resources available to you? I know this feeling because I’ve been there before. That’s why I’m offering my audience a way to get free consultations with me, where we work one-on-one to really launch your private practice into action! Apply for the Canada’s Digital Adoption program If you haven’t heard of this yet, I highly recommend that you listen to my podcast episode on the microgrant to get a better picture of what this is, if you are eligible, and how to apply. Essentially, it’s a microgrant of $2,400 for eligible Canadian private practices and other businesses that make over 30k a year, or have hired employees. If you are approved, you can use this grant to grow your Canadian business online. Some of the ways that you can use this grant include: Installing an e-commerce platform like an online booking page s Updating your website Optimizing your social media And, you can use this money to hire a consultant! ‘If you are approved to receive this grant money, you can use up to $1000 of it to speak to a consultant, like me! Doing consultation with me can really help you to clarify how you want to spend that grant money, what areas of your practice you want to focus on and optimize.’ - Julia Smith To get started on your application for the grant, click this link to find out more. What to do if you don’t qualify? However, not all Canadian private practice owners would qualify for this grant. If you are one of these few, you can still get a chance to have a free consultation with me! With my podcast as a resource, I offer free consultations. Once you know that you want to apply to be on the Fearless Practice Podcast with me, you can apply through this link to start the conversation! ‘I would love to meet with you and help you start or grow your Canadian private practice!’ - Julia Smith. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources Mentioned and Useful Links: Ep 93: Alanna Beitner: Create the Life You Want Through Private Practice | EP 93 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Article: How to Set Up a Canadian Private Practice Website Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon, and TuneIn

Duration:00:08:44

Alanna Beitner: Create the Life You Want Through Private Practice | Ep 93

10/4/2023
What does the life look like that you have envisioned for yourself? Are you your own boss with time flexibility and autonomy? Or working in an agency with paid vacations and sick days? There is no right or wrong answer when it comes to choosing whether or not you want to start your own Canadian private practice. The yardstick that you could use is whether or not your future decisions are putting you closer or further away from creating the life that you want. In this podcast episode, Alanna and I discuss how starting private practices helped us to create the lifestyle that feels the most authentic to ourselves, our desires for the future, and how we wanted to improve our lives. If you’re trying to decide whether to start a practice or not, give this podcast episode a listen! MEET ALANNA Alanna is a compassionate registered social worker with a decade of valuable experience in the field. Her unwavering dedication to assisting others has led her to work in diverse community settings, including community shelters, drop-in centers, residences, and non-profit community agencies. Recently, Alanna made the decision to transition from community work to establishing her private practice in Ottawa, Ontario. Learn more about Alanna on her Psychology Today profile, LinkedIn, and at her Trauma Clinic profile. In this episode: How Alanna got into private practice Advertising and marketing Lessons learned from starting a private practice How Alanna got into private practice Due to the fact that Alanna initially struggled to find a full-time position after graduating, she worked a couple of contract jobs mostly within her community. She worked in different agencies with different areas of the population until last November when she started her own Canadian private practice. Alanna spent time listening to podcasts and learning from her community how to set up her new Canadian private practice the right way. She also signed up for my free e-course and bought the workbook to help her! Finding the right information for you will help you to launch your private practice in the best way possible. Advertising and marketing Alanna connected with another practitioner to market herself and her services on website directories. Being part of directories is a great way to put yourself out there and to make it easier for your clients to find you. Through directories such as Ottawa Counselling and Psychotherapy, Psychology Today, and the Trauma Clinic directory, as well as word-of-mouth, Alanna has been able to connect with and see clients. In the future, she is considering getting a website. If you still want to build your website, or give a boost to your marketing efforts, listen to my podcast episode on applying for the Canada’s grow your online business grant. Lessons learned from starting a private practice One of the main aspects of running a private practice that Alanna is still trying to figure out is how to structure her caseload and the amount of clients that she can see without burning out while still remaining profitable. There are pros and cons to any situation; working in an agency, or starting your own practice. Some days, many therapists might miss having a paid vacation or getting paid sick days, which are not always possible when you are your own boss. However long the list of pros and cons would be for working either in private practice or in an agency, at the end of the day, you have to decide what works best for you and the lifestyle that you want to create for yourself. Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 92: Masami Hirata: Use Marketing to Bridge the Gap Between Like, Know, and Trust | EP 92 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Learn more about Alanna on her Psychology Today profile,...

Duration:00:30:35

Masami Hirata: Use Marketing to Bridge the Gap Between Like, Know, and Trust | Ep 92

9/27/2023
Have you heard of the marketing rule of seven? How can you build your “marketing house” from the ground up? What is the best sequence that you need to organize your marketing strategy into for authentic success? Marketing is a necessary strategy and tool that’s relevant across the board, for all businesses, including therapy. You need to focus on your message first before you put it out into channels to connect with your audience, and to successfully “lift the veil”. In this podcast episode, I chat about everything to do with marketing with one of the most experienced professionals who works on the topic, Masami Hirata, the chief marketing officer for Jane App. MEET MASAMI Masami is Chief Marketing Officer at Jane (jane.app), a customer-adored practice management software company. She is passionate about building collaborative, customer focused marketing teams that drive high growth for mission-driven companies. Learn more about Masami on her LinkedIn profile. In this episode: Marketing as a creative outlet The best sequence for successful marketing Finding your blueprint Some of the current top marketing strategies Network! Marketing as a creative outlet Masami’s a natural creative, and being the Chief Marketing Officer of Jane App is precisely the best place for someone that loves to be innovative and explorative in their ideas and approaches on connecting with the ideal customers of the company. The best sequence for successful marketing It’s great if you have the intention and the drive, and your efforts will be even more successful if you place them in the best order. Before you pick a channel, start with your message. What do you want to say? Who are you saying it to? What is the outcome that you are expecting? What is the solution that you can offer? Getting your strategy in order first before you pick a channel and create content will help that content to be much more effective once you publish it. Finding your blueprint Look for commonalities between the things that are helping your clients What are the themes and problems that they all face? What solution can you deliver that will help them to resolve their problems across the board Consider marketing as a way to “lift the veil of the unknown” as Masami explains. Your marketing efforts make your clients feel more drawn to you because they feel like they know you. Some of the current top marketing strategies The marketing rule of seven is a classic strategy that’s been effective for almost one hundred years! Essentially, a client needs to see and interact with seven touchpoints about your product or service before they generally feel comfortable enough to buy it. Network! It’s no secret that networking is one of the cornerstones to a successful business. It’s you going out into the world and telling people that you are there! Share your business with the other practitioners and organizations that you know it will connect well with. Consider joining the Jane App Facebook Group to meet with other practitioners and share the wisdom! Additionally if you want to learn more about the best practices for marketing, telehealth, and more, join the Jane App Front Desk! Connect with me: Instagram Website Resources mentioned and useful links: Ep 91: Luc Grey: Following Your Entrepreneurial Calling as a Therapist | EP 91 Learn more about the tools and deals that I love and use for my Canadian private practice Sign up for my free e-course on How to Start an Online Canadian Private Practice Jane App (use code FEARLESS for one month free) Learn more about Masami on her LinkedIn profile. Jane Facebook Community Group: A great place to network with fellow practitioners and ask any question. You don't need to be a Jane user to join, and anyone can request membership at https://www.facebook.com/groups/janerunsclinics/ Jane's Front Desk magazine: The first ever Clinic facing magazine that is full of great articles to help you grow your practice. You...

Duration:00:46:12