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Cityscape (WFUV)

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Location:

Bronx, NY

Networks:

WFUV

Description:

Introduces you to the people and the issues that help shape one of the greatest cities in the world.

Language:

English


Episodes

#WildlifeNYC

9/20/2017
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When it comes to wild animals, chances are a lot of people don’t associate them with cities like New York. That is unless you count pigeons, rats and squirrels. But, look closer and you’ll discover a wide variety of untamed creatures in the Big Apple, from coyotes to opossums to skunks. On this week’s Cityscape, we’ll talk with a woman who helps to rehabilitate injured, sick and orphaned wild animals in the city. Also this week, New York City is home to tens of thousands of feral and stray...

Duration: 00:30:00


The Big History of Little Italy

9/13/2017
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If you’re in the mood for sausage and peppers or a cannoli, there’s no better time to be in New York City. The San Gennaro Feast has taken over the streets of Manhattan’s Little Italy. The annual event has a long history in the neighborhood. In fact, it’s now in its 91st year. The San Gennaro festival runs through September 24th. On this week's Cityscape we're delving into the history of Little Italy and the San Gennaro Feast.

Duration: 00:30:00


Meet the Van Dusens, One of Manhattan's Oldest Families

9/6/2017
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Tracing your family history is as simple as ever thanks to genealogy websites and DNA ancestry test kits. For Brooklyn resident Andrew Van Dusen, the roots of his family tree were uncovered through a middle school class project. Van Dusen discovered that he was a 12th generation descendant of one of Manhattan’s first few hundred settlers. He's our guest on this week's Cityscape.

Duration: 00:30:00


Biting into the History of the Hot Dog

8/30/2017
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If you’re headed to a Labor Day weekend gathering, chances are someone will be serving hot dogs. The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council estimates that Americans eat 20 billion hot dogs a year. The Council says over a third of hot dogs are consumed between Memorial Day and Labor Day. As peak hot dog eating season comes to an end, we bring you an episode devoted to the hot dog, or as it was sometimes referred to in the 1920s, the frankfurter sandwich.

Duration: 00:29:59


The Sand, Surf, History and Culture of Brighton Beach

8/23/2017
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With the summer quickly coming to a close, a lot of folks are looking to squeeze in at least one more trip to the beach. New York City is home to some pretty nice beach destinations. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re taking in the sand, surf, history and culture of Brighton Beach in Brooklyn. If you’re unfamiliar with Brighton Beach chances are you know its neighbor, Coney Island. But, like Coney, Brighton Beach also has distinct character all its own, and is often referred to as “Little...

Duration: 00:29:59


Mommy Talk

8/16/2017
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Just in time for the back-to-school season, a new novel is out about the trials and tribulations of being the class mom. The book is actually titled Class Mom. On this week's Cityscape, author Laurie Gelman joins us to talk about what inspired her to write a novel about a year in the life of a kindergarten class mom. Laurie is married to Michael Gelman, executive producer of “Live! With Kelly and Ryan." She has two kids and lives in Manhattan. We'll also hear a touching tale of motherhood...

Duration: 00:30:00


Candy and Milkshakes with a Side of Nostalgia

8/9/2017
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In a city like New York, new, trendy restaurants and shops open all the time. Sometimes all it takes is a photo of a delectable dish on Instagram to make an eatery a sensation. But, sometimes establishments are not celebrated for what's new, but for what's old. On this week's Cityscape, we're in for a sweet treat. And we mean that literally! We're going inside two establishments that have stood the test of time -- The Lexington Candy Shop, that's been in business for 92 years, and Economy...

Duration: 00:30:01


Romancing the Stone in NYC

8/2/2017
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It’s a common scene in New York City – people hurrying down the sidewalk, many staring at their smartphones. But, while they’re looking down, architect Robert Arthur King is looking up. King specifically likes to take photographs of decorative stone carvings on the facades of buildings – faces, animal figures, flowers. These are sculptures mostly created by anonymous artisans in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. King’s photographs of these sculptures are featured in 3 books – Faces...

Duration: 00:29:58


A Visit to the Rockefeller's Kykuit

7/26/2017
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New York City is a place of endless discoveries. But, sometimes it’s nice to escape the concrete jungle for greener pastures. On this week’s show, we’re heading north – roughly 30 miles north of Manhattan to be exact. We're visiting Kykuit, otherwise known as the John D. Rockefeller Estate in Sleepy Hollow. Its views are spectacular and its history is rich. We talked with two individuals with great knowledge of and appreciation for the property: Kykuit’s Curator Cynthia Altman and Larry...

Duration: 00:30:00


The Structure of Design

7/19/2017
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You might not be familiar with his name, but you may have marveled at one of the many projects he’s been involved with. Leslie Earl Robertson is an American engineer who helped to create some of the most innovative and daring buildings of the modern era. Robertson was the lead structural engineer of the Twin Towers of the original World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. He worked on that project with architect Minoru Yamasaki. Yamasaki was just one of many internationally renowned...

Duration: 00:30:00


Fresh Starts: Life After Prison

7/12/2017
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New York City wants to close Rikers Island within the next 10 years. The plan involves an effort to reduce the inmate population so the city can open small jails to replace the massive complex. One way the city is looking to reduce recidivism is through a "jails to jobs" initiative. But, getting a job isn’t always easy for someone who has spent time behind bars. Employers can be reluctant to hire someone with a criminal record. And ex-offenders with visible tattoos can face an especially...

Duration: 00:30:00


Up in the Cheap Seats

7/5/2017
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Anyone with an appreciation for Broadway might vividly remember their first show. On this week's Cityscape we're talking with a guy whose childhood was defined by Broadway. Between the ages of 11 and 16, Ron Fassler saw more than 200 Broadway shows. He reflects on his days of frequenting the Great White Way as a youth in a new book called Up in the Cheap Seats: A Historical Memoir of Broadway.

Duration: 00:30:00


Strike a Chord: Healthy Kids

6/28/2017
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Studies show that healthy children get better grades, attend school more often and behave better in class. But, many kids face unique barriers to health. We delve into the issue as part of WFUV's Strike a Chord campaign with a distinguished panel of experts: (B’N Fit)Wellenss in the Schools

Duration: 00:30:00


Mysterious Islands of NYC

6/21/2017
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New York City is made up of several islands. The big ones, like Manhattan and Staten Island, need no introduction. Even some of the smaller ones have significant name recognition, like Coney Island and City Island. But, how much do you know about the islands not accessible to the general public? On this week's Cityscape we're exploring a couple of mysterious islands in New York City -- Hart Island and North Brother Island.

Duration: 00:30:00


Here's the Scoop: Ice Cream in NYC

6/14/2017
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I scream, you scream, we all scream, for ice cream -- especially at this time of year. After all, what better way to keep cool than with a vanilla cone or whatever flavor suits your fancy? New York City is home to a wide variety of ice cream shops, including a brand new one that’s serving up frozen treats to the 21 and over crowd. On this week's Cityscape, we're visiting Tipsy Scoop and other hot spots for frozen treats in New York City.

Duration: 00:30:00


Life Interrupted

6/7/2017
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Being a 20-something can be exciting. It’s a time in your life when you’re often presented with great opportunities and once in a lifetime adventures. But, what happens when life throws you a major curveball? Our guest this week is Suleika Jaouad. She’s a writer, advocate, public speaker and cancer survivor. Suleika was 22 when she learned she had leukemia. She went on to write about her experiences with cancer in a New York Times column titled Life Interrupted, as well as in other...

Duration: 00:30:00


Marilyn in Manhattan

5/31/2017
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She was a Hollywood sensation known for her beauty and charisma. She died young -- at the age of 36. But, more than 50 years after her death, Marilyn Monroe is still an icon. Her image can be seen everywhere from t-shirts to coffee mugs. On this week’s Cityscape, we’re focusing on Marilyn’s time -- not in Tinseltown -- but in New York City. Our guest is Elizabeth Winder, the author of Marilyn in Manhattan: Her Year of Joy.

Duration: 00:30:00


Norman Bel Geddes: The 20th Century's Leonardo da Vinci

5/24/2017
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The name Norman Bel Geddes is not as commonly known as Thomas Edison, Alexander Graham Bell or Henry Ford. But, Bel Geddes’ designs are reflected in everything from cocktail shakers to radios to kitchen appliances. Bel Geddes may be best known for the massive Futurama exhibit at the 1939 World's Fair in Queens. Alex Szerlip is the author of a new biography of the iconic designer and inventor. It’s called The Man Who Designed the Future: Norman Bel Geddes and the Invention of 20th Century...

Duration: 00:30:00


A City Seen

5/17/2017
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New York is one of the most the most photographed cities in the world. Amateur and professional photographers alike have long found inspiration in the Big Apple. On this week's Cityscape, we're focusing in on two great photographers in New York City history -- Alice Austen and Todd Webb. Austen was one of the nation’s earliest and most prolific female photographers, and Webb has been called the best mid-century photographer you've never heard of. That’s because he’s not nearly as well...

Duration: 00:30:00


Peter Gethers Serves Up Touching Tribute to his Mom

5/10/2017
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Food has the power to do much more than nourish our bodies. Just the taste of a certain dish can conjure up vivid memories of people and places in our past. Our guest this week is Peter Gethers. He’s an author, screenwriter, playwright, book editor and film and television producer. His latest book pays tribute to his mom, Judy Gethers, who was a celebrated cook and cookbook writer. It’s called My Mother’s Kitchen: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and the Meaning of Life.

Duration: 00:29:56

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