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Have you ever wondered what Charlemagne has to do with the history of Islam in Europe? Marissa & Katie have the scoop. Did you know that the pilgrims ate passenger pigeon, but not apple pie, at the first Thanksgiving? Averill, Sarah & Tommy will tell you all about it. How did average Americans react to the bombing of Pearl Harbor? Dan & Elizabeth delve into the nitty gritty. Join the History Buffs for these stories and more!

Have you ever wondered what Charlemagne has to do with the history of Islam in Europe? Marissa & Katie have the scoop. Did you know that the pilgrims ate passenger pigeon, but not apple pie, at the first Thanksgiving? Averill, Sarah & Tommy will tell you all about it. How did average Americans react to the bombing of Pearl Harbor? Dan & Elizabeth delve into the nitty gritty. Join the History Buffs for these stories and more!
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Location:

Buffalo, NY

Description:

Have you ever wondered what Charlemagne has to do with the history of Islam in Europe? Marissa & Katie have the scoop. Did you know that the pilgrims ate passenger pigeon, but not apple pie, at the first Thanksgiving? Averill, Sarah & Tommy will tell you all about it. How did average Americans react to the bombing of Pearl Harbor? Dan & Elizabeth delve into the nitty gritty. Join the History Buffs for these stories and more!

Language:

English


Episodes

NEW EPISODE

9/20/2017
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Head over to Dig: A History Podcast and subscribe for all new episodes from your favorite historians. We love you! We miss you! COME BACK TO US!

Duration: 00:01:01


Revised: Burning of Buffalo in the War of 1812

8/13/2017
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Subscribe to Dig: A History Podcast now, where ever you get your podcasts. digpodcast.org

Duration: 00:33:55


Revised: The Founding of APO

7/16/2017
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Sarah and Averill deliver a much-needed update and revision to our early episode on the founding of the AIDS Project of the Ozarks.

Duration: 00:45:49


Farewell Episode

6/11/2017
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It is with great sadness and equally great excitement that we release this episode - our reflection on two years of History Buffing. In the fall, the show will be rebranded as Dig: A History Podcast, as a few of our founding members are putting podcasting into the backseat of their lives as they pursue careers and degrees, and Averill, Marissa, Elizabeth, and Sarah embark on a new iteration of what you’ve come to expect from the History Buffs. Thank you, dear listeners, for journeying...

Duration: 00:49:33


Refugees in the Congo Jungle

6/4/2017
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Join Averill and Katie as they discuss the trek of Central African refugees on a harrowing journey through the jungle. For the last installment of our immigration series we conquer a major 20th-century crisis that is often overlooked: the flight of refugees from Rwanda and the Congo during the mid-1990s. This crisis produced more refugees than any event since World War II, and they trekked through some of the thickest jungle on Earth to escape violence and advancing armies.

Duration: 00:39:34


Buffalo 9 and the Vietnam War

5/28/2017
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We are super excited - this is our first listener request! The late 1960s were a tumultuous time in the United States - major political assassinations, riots, protests, and a deeply controversial war all added up to a fractured and bruised society. Much of the action during the time period took place on college campuses - our own University at Buffalo included. Today, Sarah and Averill are talking about the court case at the heart of some of the most intense protests the University has...

Duration: 00:55:06


Whiskey Rebellion, with Shots of History

5/21/2017
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Sarah and Marissa team up with Shots of History to talk about the history of whiskey-making the United States, and the notorious Whiskey Rebellion of 1791.

Duration: 00:41:10


Straight Edge: Historian VS Hardcore Kid

5/21/2017
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Averill and Marissa grill Black X frontman Mark Miller from the HMNI Fanzine Podcast and historian of alcohol activism Colin Eager on straight edge, the hardcore music scene, and how they fit into the 1980s drug-panicked, “Just Say No” Reagan era.

Duration: 01:01:20


Black Athena

5/14/2017
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In 1987, a historian of modern China wrote a book that was way outside of his field - a historiographical work about the classical world, which argued that argued a racist and imperialist Europe had written Egyptian and Phoenician origins out of Greek history — essentially whitewashing the African roots of Western civilization. The book caused a firestorm within the field of Classics, launching a series of rebuttals and re-rebuttals. Today’s episode is about the thesis that Bernal posed in...

Duration: 00:51:20


NAFTA, Maquiladoras, and Mexican Immigration in the US

4/30/2017
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Donald Trump, in a September 2016 presidential debate, said, “NAFTA is the worst trade deal maybe ever signed anywhere, but certainly ever signed in this country.” But NAFTA was not addressed in any of his executive orders, and now President Trump’s intentions for NAFTA are unclear. Today Averill and Elizabeth continue our series on US immigration with this episode about the North American Foreign Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Maquiladoras and Mexican immigration in the 20th century. Trump has...

Duration: 00:36:19


Communists and Uteruses

4/16/2017
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There is something fascinating about the history of reproductive rights, contraception, and abortion in every country and ideology that we’ve looked at in our women’s reproductive rights series. This week we’re turning to the impact of Communism on these issues, particularly in China and the Soviet Union. Here we have the complete range of reproductive control extremes - from hyper pro-natalist policies and criminalization of birth control and abortion in both China and the USSR; to the...

Duration: 00:46:18


Mexican Braceros & the Welfare State

4/9/2017
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In this continuation of our series on immigration, Dan and Elizabeth focus on the Mexican-American experience within the United States: instances of racism, the importation of Mexican workers, and how Mexican-Americans were intentionally excluded from the welfare state. The Bracero Program began in 1942, and was an agreement between the United States and Mexico, which started the legalization and control of Mexican migrant workers along America’s southern border area. The program lasted...

Duration: 00:45:44


Anti-Vivesection in the 19th Century

4/2/2017
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Things have been pretty political around here lately, so we wanted to dig into something that’s just fascinating and, frankly, creepy: anti-vivisection, or the 19th century campaign to end scientific and medical experimentation on living animals. Join Averill and Sarah as they talk about the practice of vivisection and the efforts to stop it. Also, a word of warning: we use some nineteenth century language when reading quotes, and also describe some pretty graphic events. You might want to...

Duration: 00:45:54


The Treaty of Hidalgo

3/26/2017
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When we think of immigration we tend to think of people crossing over nation-state borders, from one country to another. These borders seem somehow solid in our collective mind, yet they normally only exist within treaties, maps, and in perceived ideas of community. But in many ways, borders are arbitrary distinctions, attempting to separate one from another but instead creating unique spaces, or borderlands that house a give and take, push and pull, amalgam of culture and people. In this...

Duration: 00:29:51


Jane Roe & The Pill

3/19/2017
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In the third episode in our series on women’s reproductive rights in America, we finally get to two of the most important turning points in our story: the invention of the hormonal birth control pill, and the Roe v. Wade case in 1973. The mid 20th century saw some critical turning points for women’s reproductive rights, but also created lasting political divides and moral dilemmas. Join Elizabeth and Sarah as they continue the conversation.

Duration: 01:03:14


Forced Migrations

3/12/2017
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Immigration and migration have been pretty hot topics lately. This week a particularly interesting question has been bouncing around just about everywhere: were the people transported during the Atlantic Slave Trade immigrants? This got us thinking about forced migrations. In this episode, join Averill and Sarah as they talk about two particularly powerful examples of forced migration: the Atlantic Slave Trade, and Indian Removal. Also, a little chat at the end about the work we do, both...

Duration: 01:01:28


How America Got Its Bases

3/5/2017
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It should come as no surprise that the American military has bases all over the world in strategically important places. But how did we obtain them, especially those ones that exist in the middle of other sovereign nations? Join Averill, Katie, and Dan as they discuss American base acquisition in this week’s episode of the History Buffs Podcast. Show Notes and Further Reading Diego Garcia: “Diego Garcia Islanders Displaced in U.K. Failure Hope to Return Home,” NPR, April 16,...

Duration: 00:42:11


Fascism and Uteruses

2/26/2017
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There are some fascinating parallels between the deployment of eugenic policies around reproduction and women’s bodies in twentieth-century Germany and Japan. In this episode, the fourth in the HBP’s work on reproductive rights and fights in history (from the US to the world). Marissa and Averill tackle eugenics, Nazis, legalized abortion and illegal hormonal birth control, marriage counseling, and more. It’s a story of governments trying to dictate how women can or cannot use their...

Duration: 00:39:17


Abortion and Birth Control before Roe v. Wade

2/19/2017
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At the Women’s Marches across the U.S. on January 21st, there were hundreds–maybe thousands–of women in their 60s, 70s, and 80s who held up signs that conveyed their frustration with still needing to fight for rights like birth control and abortion. This is a battle that has waged for so, so long. On this episode, Sarah and Elizabeth look back at the late 19th and early 20th century struggle for women’s rights. After our country finally granted women the right to vote in 1920, the emphasis...

Duration: 00:59:47


Huddled Masses

2/12/2017
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America prides itself on being a country of immigrants - after all, everyone in the United States is the descendant of an immigrant, whether forced and free, unless they are Native American. Americans believe that we offer a place of welcome so much that we emblazoned it onto the Statues of Liberty in the form of Emma Lazarus’s poem, The New Colossus, with those famous lines about the poor, tired, and huddled masses. But like most things in history, the real story is a lot more...

Duration: 01:01:48

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