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Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

American Public Media

Because none of us is as smart as all of us. Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly is a podcast about the economy, technology and culture. Hosts Kai Ryssdal and Molly Wood will use their expertise to connect the dots on the topics they know best, and get help from listeners and experts about the ones they want to know better. The conversation begins January 2017.

Because none of us is as smart as all of us. Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly is a podcast about the economy, technology and culture. Hosts Kai Ryssdal and Molly Wood will use their expertise to connect the dots on the topics they know best, and get help from listeners and experts about the ones they want to know better. The conversation begins January 2017.
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United States

Description:

Because none of us is as smart as all of us. Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly is a podcast about the economy, technology and culture. Hosts Kai Ryssdal and Molly Wood will use their expertise to connect the dots on the topics they know best, and get help from listeners and experts about the ones they want to know better. The conversation begins January 2017.

Language:

English


Episodes

51: Rahm Remixed

2/20/2018
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Rahm Emanuel likes to talk. The two-term mayor of Chicago and former White House chief of staff to President Barack Obama spoke with us at length about everything from populism to immigration. He told us that Chicago is a "welcoming" city, not a sanctuary city. He's got a special chair. And he's got some sharp words for "Mr. Moody's Doom and Gloom," otherwise known as Kai Ryssdal. Plus, Emanuel takes the longest pause ever to answer our Make Me Smart Question. On March 6th, we'll release our...

Duration:00:39:41

51: Remember when a Columbia River boat pilot made us smart about shoes?

2/6/2018
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The Columbia River Bar is one of the most dangerous places in the world for ships of all sizes. That's where the Columbia River Bar Pilots come in. These specially trained experts pilot cargo and passenger ships of all sizes across the bar into the river that separates Oregon from Washington. Capt. Deborah Dempsey was the first woman to become a pilot with the organization, and she tells us why tying your shoes can keep you from falling "in the drink," and what happened the one time she...

Duration:00:30:42

50: The internet of thoughts

1/23/2018
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This week, we're looking back at our previous episodes that focused on the internet. First up, our conversation with Zeynep Tufekci, author of "Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest," then we revisit our conversation with New York Magazine's Max Read about Facebook. Plus: We're reading your thoughts on what we should do in season 2, and Molly explains why she didn't go to the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this year. Don't forget to vote for what we...

Duration:00:33:19

49: Gerrymandering, hard-wired brains and the baby under the desk

1/9/2018
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Could big data make elections more fair? One of our listeners is looking for answers about gerrymandering, and we got some help this week from Justin Levitt, professor of law at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. He has something to say about elected officials listening to their constituents. Then, we're looking back at previous episodes of Make Me Smart that focused on why it's so hard for people to really listen to each other. We go all the way back to episode one, where we posed this...

Duration:00:32:21

48: Explainathon the third

1/2/2018
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To kick off the new year, we're answering another bunch of questions from you, the listeners. Kai and Molly give their takes on what companies value most, where we're headed with bitcoin technology, and when we started being so scared of robots taking our jobs. We also had a question we couldn't answer, so we called up the Southern Poverty Law Center. To top it all off, we have an answer to the Make Me Smart question from one of you. This is the final episode of season one, but stay tuned...

Duration:00:25:55

Special report: How one sentence helped set off the opioid crisis

12/28/2017
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When OxyContin went to market in 1996, sales reps from Purdue Pharma hit one point particularly hard: Compared to other prescription opioids, this new painkiller was believed to be less likely to be addictive or abused. But recently unsealed documents in this investigative episode shed light on how the maker of OxyContin seems to have relied more on focus groups than on scientific studies to create an aggressive and misleading marketing campaign that helped fuel the national opioid crisis....

Duration:01:07:23

47: Make Me Smart predictions

12/26/2017
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It's the final Make Me Smart of 2017 and we got a few of our previous guests to give us predictions about what they think might happen in 2018. Who made predictions: Andy Weir, author of "The Martian" and "Artemis." Annabelle Gurwitch, actress and the author of "Wherever You Go, There They Are: Stories About My Family You Might Relate To." Zeynep Tufekci, associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and author of "Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of...

Duration:00:33:04

46: With Gates' power comes Gates' responsibility

12/19/2017
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In 2006, Microsoft founder Bill Gates told USA Today that "with great wealth comes great responsibility, a responsibility to give back to society and a responsibility to see that those resources are put to work in the best possible way to help those most in need." The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is the largest privately owned foundation in the world, and CEO Sue Desmond-Hellmann is charge of the $40 billion endowment. She says the foundation's job is to listen but also to innovate,...

Duration:00:27:24

45. "A Wrinkle in Time" and the battle against rhythmic cyclical hopelessness

12/13/2017
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Madeleine L'Engle, the author of the classic novel "A Wrinkle in Time," believed "there comes a point where you can go as far as thinking will take you, and then you will move into the world that might become fantasy, which is that world beyond where your mind will take you, and then you stop, you stop short, and you listen." L'Engle, who wrote more than 60 books, would have turned 100 years old in 2018. For this month's book club episode, we had a delightful conversation with her...

Duration:00:35:51

44: Where are all the "lost Einsteins?"

12/5/2017
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Who are the "lost Einsteins?" That's the question Raj Chetty is trying to answer. He's a professor of economics who works on the Equality of Opportunity Project at Stanford University. The project uses big data sets, like anonymous tax and U.S. Patent records, to figure out who is and who is not innovating in the United States today. You can hear more of Kai's conversation with Raj Chetty on Marketplace.org.

Duration:00:32:48

42: Breaking bread without conflict

11/21/2017
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Retired cognitive science and linguistics professor George Lakoff appeared in a previous episode, explaining how your brain reacts to political rhetoric. He's back this week with tips on how to break through to family members this holiday, even if you don't share the same worldview. Also, we talk a lot about avocado toast on this show. Like, a lot. So we wanted to know: What was the avocado toast — the trendy, divisive foodstuff — of the Victorian era? Culinary historian Heather Arndt...

Duration:00:22:20

41: Do you hear the people sing?

11/14/2017
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As we continue to ask the question of whether free-market capitalism is working for enough people, we found ourselves with another question — what happens when it doesn't? Political and economic disruption follows. New leaders emerge. Movements emerge again, like populism. Sheri Berman, a professor of political science at Barnard College, says, "populism arises at times when existing democratic institutions, governments, political parties, political elites, are seen as not responding to...

Duration:00:26:33

40: Explainathon 2! The search for more answers

11/7/2017
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It's time for another Make Me Smart Explainathon, where we answer as many of your questions as we can about the things you want to know more about. We also have an answer to our Make Me Smart question from a listener, and we picked the final book for our 2017 Make Me Smart Book Club. It's "A Wrinkle in Time" by Madeleine L'Engle, which is being adapted for the big screen next year by Academy Award-nominated director Ava DuVernay.

Duration:00:34:28

39: Distressed human assets

10/31/2017
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One way to improve capitalism? Focus on dignity. That's what Arthur C. Brooks, the president of the American Enterprise Institute, believes. He says that the only way to more economic growth is bringing a sense of dignity back to the political conversation, so that the 6.8 million people without jobs in this country, who he calls "distressed human assets," can be matched to the more than six million jobs openings. Also, we're talking about the things that frighten us in our first-ever...

Duration:00:36:10

38: Confronting Capitalism

10/25/2017
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Ethical capitalism. Moral capitalism. Enlightened capitalism. What are we talking about when we talk about how to change capitalism? Molly talked with Philip Kotler, the S.C. Johnson & Son Professor of International Marketing at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. He has written more than 50 books about marketing, as well as the book we mentioned on the show, "Confronting Capitalism." Speaking of books, you can vote for the book you want to read for our final Make...

Duration:00:38:49

37.5: Hold on for one more day...

10/24/2017
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No podcast today, but there will be one Wednesday. Until then, we've got a little preview of our continuing discussion of moral capitalism to whet your appetite ... or make you run for the hills. You decide. Talk with you soon.

Duration:00:03:43

37: Is it time to take capitalism into the shop for a look under the hood?

10/18/2017
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Tim O'Reilly, founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, says financial markets are almost like rogue artificial intelligence, but it doesn't have to be that way. Then: FCC Chairman Ajit Pai finally says no, you actually can't take away a broadcast license (Mr. President). Finally, "The Lego Ninjago Movie" producer Daniel Lin answers our Make Me Smart question.

Duration:00:30:41

37: Is it time to take capitalism into the shop for a look under the hood?

10/17/2017
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Tim O'Reilly, founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, says financial markets are almost like a rogue AI, but it doesn't have to be that way. Then: FCC Chairman Ajit Pai finally says no, you actually can't take away a broadcast license (Mr. President). Finally "The Lego Ninjago Movie" producer Daniel Lin answers our Make Me Smart question.

Duration:00:20:55

36: "The Man in the High Castle" has a lot on his mind

10/10/2017
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"Blade Runner." "Total Recall." "Minority Report." These are big-budget movies from big-name directors, but they all sprung from the mind of author Philip K. Dick. He also wrote "The Man in the High Castle," our second Make Me Smart book club selection. Author, journalist and podcaster Erik Davis is our guide on this mind-bending journey — along with all of you, of course. Plus, we get some insight into alternate realities and computer simulations from philosopher Nick Bostrom. You can...

Duration:00:51:58

34.5: No new show this week

10/3/2017
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There's no new Make Me Smart podcast this week. But we did answer that one remaining question about the sequester, from last week's Explainathon. It's called "What You Need To Know About The Sequester And Trump" and it's right there on our site. You also still have time to send us your thoughts about our book club selection, "The Man In The High Castle" by Phillip K. Dick.

Duration:00:01:40

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