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Midday on WNYC

WNYC

WNYC hosts the conversation New Yorkers turn to each afternoon for insight into contemporary art, theater, and literature, plus expert tips about the ever-important lunchtime topic: food. WNYC Studios is the producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, Death, Sex & Money, Freakonomics Radio and many others. Find these and more great shows at wnyc.org © WNYC

WNYC hosts the conversation New Yorkers turn to each afternoon for insight into contemporary art, theater, and literature, plus expert tips about the ever-important lunchtime topic: food. WNYC Studios is the producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, Death, Sex & Money, Freakonomics Radio and many others. Find these and more great shows at wnyc.org © WNYC
More Information

Location:

New York, NY

Networks:

WNYC

Description:

WNYC hosts the conversation New Yorkers turn to each afternoon for insight into contemporary art, theater, and literature, plus expert tips about the ever-important lunchtime topic: food. WNYC Studios is the producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, Death, Sex & Money, Freakonomics Radio and many others. Find these and more great shows at wnyc.org © WNYC

Language:

English

Contact:

WNYC Radio 160 Varick St. New York, NY 10013


Episodes

The Untold Stories of a WWII French Resistance Fighter

1/9/2018
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Paul Kix talks about his new book The Saboteur: The Aristocrat Who Became France’s Most Daring Anti-Nazi Commando. He tells one of the untold stories of the French resistance during World War II. Kix recreates the daring achievements of Robert de la Rochefoucauld, who trained with Churchill’s Secret Operations Executive and waged a personal war against the Nazis who had invaded his beloved country and imprisoned his father. Event: On Thursday, January 11th, Paul Kix will be at Community...

Duration:00:16:28

How Will Big Data Affect Policing?

1/9/2018
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Andrew G. Ferguson, Professor of Law at the University of the District of Columbia's David A. Clarke School of Law, discusses his book The Rise of Big Data Policing: Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement. He examines big data and algorithm-driven policing and its impact on law enforcement. He also looks at how new technologies will alter the who, where, when and how we police, and why data-driven methods could actually improve police accountability.

Duration:00:33:17

Bob Garfield's One-Man Show

1/8/2018
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Bob Garfield, co-host of On the Media, discusses his new one-man show Ruggedly Jewish. It’s described as, “a raw, wistful, hilarious and disturbing encounter session,” during which Garfield “weaves together disparate narrative threads on the subject of identity -- including his own nominal Jewishness -- to explore the exploration of self itself.” The show is currently on tour and will be in NYC at the Deane Little Theater on Jan. 14 at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m.

Duration:00:15:36

An Industrial Hygienist's Perspective on the Trump Administration

1/8/2018
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Industrial hygienist Monona Rossol discusses how the Trump administration is weakening protections on hazardous chemicals. She looks at how new appointments and legislation will affect the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and the Chemical Safety Board, and their ability to protect us from toxic substances in the workplace and the home.

Duration:00:33:44

The Falsity of the Term 'Post-Truth'

1/8/2018
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Slate columnist Dan Engber talks about his cover story for Slate called, “LOL Something Matters.” He debunks popular perceptions about people's resistance to facts and argues against the nihilistic idea that we're living in a post-truth era in which there is no point in calling out falsehoods and trying to change people's minds.

Duration:00:15:40

Local News's Decline

1/8/2018
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Kyle Pope, editor and publisher of the Columbia Journalism Review at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and journalist and former Gothamist reporter Emma Whitford, discuss the state of local news, following the recent closure of Gothamist and DNAinfo, two of the city’s leading local news sources. They look at how news organizations are adapting to dwindling resources and how journalists are working to fill the gaps in coverage.

Duration:00:32:57

What Happened to Marcelo Gomes, Ballet's Rising Star

1/5/2018
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David Barba talks about his and James Pellerito's film about Marcelo Gomes, Anatomy of a Male Ballet Dancer, which they directed, wrote, edited, and produced. Raised in Rio de Janeiro, Gomes has been called the Pelé of Ballet. After winning the Prix de Lausanne, Gomes joined American Ballet Theater in 1997. He became a Soloist in 2000 and a Principal in 2002. After the film's production, Marcelo Gomes resigned from the American Ballet Theater after accusations of accusations of sexual...

Duration:00:16:05

Why the Death Toll in Puerto Rico is Rising

1/5/2018
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Freelance journalist Mattathias Schwartz discusses his recent cover story for New York Magazine, "Maria's Bodies." The article is also available in Spanish. The piece focuses on the rising death toll in Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria. His story looks at how with the number of hurricane-related deaths continuing to rise, Maria has the potential to surpass Katrina and become to most deadly natural disaster in recent U.S. history.

Duration:00:33:40

A Health Crisis For Women in Saudi Arabia

1/5/2018
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Sarah Aziza, a contributor for Harper’s Magazine, discusses her latest piece for the magazine called, “Body Politic.” She met with Saudi Arabian Princess Reema bint Bandar Al Saud, head of a newly created women’s department in the country’s sports ministry, who is working to address Saudi Arabia’s gendered health crisis. Due to legal and cultural restrictions that have been placed on women’s movement, obesity and heart disease rates for women have dramatically increased.

Duration:00:17:13

'Under the Radar Festival'

1/4/2018
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“Under the Radar Festival” director Mark Russell discusses the 2018 festival, along with Kelly Cooper and Pavol Liska, from the Obie Award-winning Nature Theater of Oklahoma performance group. Cooper and Uska also talk about their UTR show, Pursuit of Happiness. Created in collaboration with six dancers of the highly acclaimed Slovenian dance company EnKnapGroup, the piece charges through a rough-and-tumble, endlessly morphing myth of the Wild West. “Pursuit of Happiness” runs January...

Duration:00:15:39

Questioning Gardasil's Testing, Without Being Anti-Vaccine

1/4/2018
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Journalist Frederik Joelving, and Slate's science editor Susan Matthews, discuss Joelving's article, “What the Gardasil Testing May Have Missed,” published in Slate as well as Matthews' companion piece, “Why Is Slate Questioning Gardasil?” In this climate where it is difficult to criticize a vaccine without being regarded as vehemently anti-vaccine, they discuss the importance of adequate safety measures in trial periods, why the Gardasil trials were “suboptimal,” and why it’s important to...

Duration:00:34:03

Are You What You Eat?

1/3/2018
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Rachel Herz, a neuroscientist specializing in perception and emotion, discusses her book Why You Eat What You Eat: The Science Behind Our Relationship With Food. She examines the sensory, psychological, neuroscientific and physiological factors that influence our eating habits. She reveals how psychology, neurology and physiology shape our relationship with food, and how food alters the relationship we have with ourselves and each other. This segment is guest hosted by Arun Venugopal.

Duration:00:33:54

A History Through Store Fronts

1/3/2018
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James and Karla Murray talk about their latest book Store Front II: A History Preserved. They have been photographing New York City since the 1990s, from bodegas, candy shops and record stores, to historical city buildings, landmarks, bars and cafes. They reveal how New York’s mom & pop businesses stand in sharp contrast to the city’s rapidly evolving corporate facade. James and Karla Murray's storefront photography will be part of the upcoming exhibition at the Brooklyn Historical...

Duration:00:15:49

MoMA's 'The Long Run'

1/3/2018
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Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, and Cara Manes, Assistant Curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture, discuss “The Long Run,” a new exhibition at MoMA they co-curated. On view through November 4, the exhibition focuses exclusively on works from MoMA's collection made by artists in their mid to late careers, highlighting lesser-known works by prominent artists and key works by some less familiar names. The...

Duration:00:14:40

Do Germans Raise More Self-Reliant Children?

1/3/2018
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Sara Zaske talks about her new book Achtung Baby: An American Mom on the German Art of Raising Self-Reliant Children. Zaske details her own experience as an American woman raising her children in Berlin and learning that German parents allowed their children to do much more on their own -- from riding the subway, to cutting food with sharp knives. Based on interviews and research, she looks at German ideas about self-reliance and raising children. This segment is guest hosted by Arun...

Duration:00:33:52

Appalachian History

1/2/2018
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Steven Stoll, a professor of history at Fordham University, talks about his new book Ramp Hollow: The Ordeal of Appalachia. He examines the region’s history, looking at key events including the Whiskey Rebellion, the founding of West Virginia and the arrival of timber and coal companies that irrevocably changed Appalachia’s economy and culture. Stoll questions our assumptions about progress and development, and exposes the devastating legacy of dispossession and its repercussions...

Duration:00:31:57

Poetry for Your Commute

1/2/2018
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Alice Quinn, the executive director of the Poetry Society of America and an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s School of the Arts, discusses her book The Best of Poetry in Motion: Celebrating Twenty-Five Years on Subways and Buses. Since 1992, the Poetry in Motion program—co-sponsored by MTA Arts & Design and the Poetry Society of America—has brought more than 200 poems before the eyes of millions of subway and bus riders. Quinn discusses the curated collection of 100 poems and looks...

Duration:00:16:34

'Saving Charlotte: A Mother and the Power of Intuition'

1/2/2018
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Novelist Pia de Jong talks about her new book Saving Charlotte: A Mother and the Power of Intuition. She tells the story of her daughter, Charlotte, who was diagnosed with a rare and deadly form of leukemia, often treated with chemotherapy. Pia and her husband decide instead to take Charlotte home and care for her there. This segment is guest hosted by Mary Harris.

Duration:00:14:57

What Is Happening To Our National Monuments?

12/28/2017
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Journalist Elliott Woods discusses his recent article for Outside magazine, “Ryan Zinke Is Trump's Attack Dog on the Environment.” He profiles Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and looks at the fight to preserve public lands in the U.S. Woods examines Zinke’s role in the Trump administration’s plans to cut back on the size of two huge national monuments in Utah, including Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments by nearly a million acres each. This is a rebroadcast of a...

Duration:00:33:29

WNYC Kids Introduces 'This Podcast Has Fleas'

12/28/2017
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Emily Lynne, Koyalee Chanda and Adam Peltzman talk about the launch of WNYC Kids and WNYC Studios first scripted comedy podcast for kids called, “This Podcast Has Fleas.” Emily Lynne, who has worked as an improv comedian, plays Waffles the dog. Koyalee Chanda, the podcast’s co-creator and executive producer and Adam Peltzman, writer, have previously collaborated on popular kid TV shows like “Blue’s Clues” and “Wallykazam.” This is a rebroadcast of a segment guest hosted by Arun Venugopal.

Duration:00:16:53

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