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New Hampshire Public Radio: Environment

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Episodes

Something Wild: Loon Facts and Fate

9/15/2017
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The iconic call of the loon is one you’ll hear on ponds and lakes throughout the state. We’re checked in with John Cooley, Senior Biologist with the Loon Preservation Committee to learn a bit about the bird and the state of its welfare. The iconic call of the loon is one you’ll hear on ponds and lakes throughout the state. We’re checked in with John Cooley, Senior Biologist with the Loon Preservation Committee to learn a bit about the bird and the state of its welfare. First off we know...

Duration: 00:16:14


Something Wild: Tidepools Aren't a Walk on the Beach

9/6/2017
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Labor Day weekend is often summer’s last hurrah – or at least our last chance to participate in those uniquely summer pastimes. So we thought we’d go out with some sun, surf and a nice breeze by exploring another of New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods. And once again we take a tour of great place to visit, but a hard place to eke out a living. There are only a few examples of Maritime Rocky Shores within New Hampshire’s borders, and all are along our seacoast or on the Isles of Shoals. And...

Duration: 00:05:20


RGGI States Plan For Future Beyond 2020

8/25/2017
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States participating in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, are looking towards the future. For the past two years, the nine states have been trying to determine how to clean up power plant pollution in New Hampshire and across the region after the year 2020. A new set of draft proposals lays out how RGGI might do that. State climate campaign director for Environment New Hampshire Travis Madsen spoke about this with NHPR's Peter Biello.

Duration: 00:05:32


The Music of Nature: Artist Records the Sounds of the White Mountains

8/21/2017
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Steve Wilkes is a drumming professor at Berklee College of Music in Boston. He’s also a former member of Blue Man Group and has toured the world with The Empire Brass Quintet. But for his latest gig, as this year’s White Mountain National Forest Artist in Residence, Wilkes won’t be making or teaching music - or painting his face blue. Instead, he’s recording the sounds of the forest and compiling the first ever audio map of the White Mountains . NHPR’s Sean Hurley joined Wilkes on a recent...

Duration: 00:04:19


Seacoast Marine Mammal Rescue Team On Pace For Record Year Of Activity

8/2/2017
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It’s been a busy summer for the Seacoast Science Center ’s marine mammal rescue team. There’s been a surge of late in the number of beached seals in need of rescue along New Hampshire’s coast. Ashley Stokes manages the marine mammal rescue team, and she joined NHPR's Morning Edition. Talk about what these past few weeks have been like for your team. What are you seeing? We’ve seen a pretty large increase, both in really late June and then all through July, of harbor seals. So harbor seals...

Duration: 00:05:14


From ‘Sewer’ to Beautiful: Paddling 400 Miles on New England's Longest River

7/26/2017
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The Connecticut River springs to life in Pittsburg, New Hampshire, just a few hundred yards from the Canadian border. From there, it snakes 400 or miles southward, where it discharges into the Long Island Sound. This month, a group of river-lovers are paddling the length of the Connecticut to highlight its history, importance and beauty.

Duration: 00:04:15


Something Wild: Ravens are Intelligent Opportunists

7/21/2017
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In this part of the country the Corvid family includes blue jays, gray jays, crows, and ravens. And ravens – Corvus corax – are the smartest of this intelligent family, actually their brain to body ratio is on par with whales and the great apes. Ravens are pretty common in New Hampshire, probably more common than you think since at first glance they look a lot like crows. But there are some key differences between these two big black birds. First, ravens are bigger, their wingspan is almost...

Duration: 00:05:50


Something Wild: Smell that Olfactory

7/14/2017
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We know…we’ve been remiss, and it’s time to talk about the elephant in the room. Something Wild, as you know, is a chance to take a closer look at the wildlife, ecosystems and marvelous phenomena you can find in and around New Hampshire. But over the years there is one species in New Hampshire that we haven’t spent much time examining. A species, I think that has been conspicuous in its absence. Humans. So we’re grabbing the bull by the horns and digging in to a complex species that is an...

Duration: 00:06:20


Something Wild: Cyanobacteria

7/7/2017
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To everything there is a season and this is the season when we go swimming and we spend a lot of time talking about Cyanobacteria. So what is it, exactly? we spoke with Sonya Carlson in 2016 when she was the head of the Beach Inspection Program with the state Department of Environmental Services and gave us a primer on the micro-organism. Cyanobacteria has been on earth for a long time, to the tune of 3.5 billion years! “In fact, we scientists think it's what created oxygen in our...

Duration: 00:05:04


Something Wild: Of Death, Beauty and Vultures

6/23/2017
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Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown, joined us in the field this week at Something Wild. We were in Sutton, NH tracking some turkey vulture chicks, because Dave discovered some vultures living among the rocks in a nearby cliff-face. Turkey Vultures (one of three vulture species living in North America) are obligate to this kind of structure: cavities in a boulder field, caves in a cliff, even big hollow logs. TVs don’t build their own nests, they just create a depression in an existing...

Duration: 00:05:37


Will a Deadly Fungus Destroy N.H.'s Frog Population? The Answer is Complicated

6/21/2017
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A New Hampshire undergraduate has confirmed the presence of a fungus in the state that, over the past thirty years, has caused either extinction or massive decline in more than 200 species of frogs around the world. That was enough to get Outside/In host Sam Evans-Brown interested.

Duration: 00:04:33


Something Wild: Porcupines Aren't As Prickly As You Thought

6/9/2017
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We’ve been hearing a lot about porcupines this year. They seem to be everywhere! It’s positively a plague of porcupines! So why are there so many? Biologists don’t have an official answer, but Dave Anderson has a hypothesis involving coyotes and fisher cats. The porcupine’s only real predator is the fisher. It takes a tough critter to eat a porcupine. Anecdotally, trackers and hunters are reporting that fisher numbers appear to be down this year, so it makes sense that porcupine numbers...

Duration: 00:05:33


Something Wild: What Happens to Trees in Drought?

6/2/2017
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The specter of drought is often raised in these early days of summer. And for good reason, though water levels have returned to normal around the New Hampshire, state officials are still warning residents to remain cautious after last summer drought. And while we often fret about the health of our lawns and our gardens, Dave (from the Forest Society) wanted to address drought resistance among his favorite species, trees. So, we all know that trees need water to survive. Basically the many...

Duration: 00:05:19


These Birds Aren’t Singing ‘NIMBY’ To Power Line Clear-Cuts

6/1/2017
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Picture unspoiled wild forest, the type of place only animals and Boy Scouts feel at home. Now erase that image from your mind, and picture a power line right of way: one of those ruler-straight strips of utility poles that brutishly slash through the woods. Would anything choose that for a home?

Duration: 00:04:08


5.30.17: Floriography, Daisy Supply Chain, & 99% Invisible

5/30/2017
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On today's show: Romie Stott is a film maker and writer and she wrote about the secret language of flowers for Atlas Obscura in “How Flower Obsessed Victorians Encoded Messages in Bouquets." "Daisy Supply Chain" from Outside/In . "Atom in the Garden of Eden" from 99% Invisible . You can listen to this story again at PRX.org .

Duration: 00:32:54


Something Wild: When an Irresistible Force Meets an Immoveable Object

5/19/2017
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The battlefield is ancient. Strewn with the debris of generations. Trees splintered, rocks shattered. Neither side will yield this talus slope in the pursuit of that which is most coveted. This is Game of Stones. Actually, this is just another installment of New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods, and this time we’re scaling the battle ground known as Talus. And there was some disagreement at Something Wild about whether we should call it “talus” or “talus woodland”. What we did agree on was...

Duration: 00:04:40


Something Wild: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Rattlesnakes

5/12/2017
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Before we get into this week's topic, check out Chris and Dave's recent appearance on NHPR's Outside/In. They joined host Sam Evans-Brown for a special edition of "Ask Sam" . There are few sounds in nature that command your attention as effectively as the rattle of a rattlesnake. And though these snakes are not aggressive, that sound does elicit a hard-wired, innate fear response. Roughly translating to “Watch Your Step, Mister!” the rattle is an alarm designed to stop trouble before it...

Duration: 00:05:36


Something Wild: Celebrate the Plague of Blackflies

5/5/2017
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Image yourself on a walk in the woods. It’s early spring; tiny tree flowers are clinging to branches. A nearby stream quietly gurgles and peepers pepper the air. Idyllic, right? Then, all of a sudden….a brobdingnagian buzz from a lilliputian louse! Paradise lost! (Sorry, mixing Miltonian metaphors.) Well…maybe not. First off, let’s identify that buzz, it doesn’t emanate from a louse, it comes from black flies. Everyone’s favorite bug to hate this time of year. As hours of daylight...

Duration: 00:04:52


Something Wild: When Plants Sprout...and What it Means

4/7/2017
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We tagged along with Diane DeLuca, a biologist with NH Audubon on her rounds of the Deering Wildlife Sanctuary. DeLuca has been working on their Phenological Monitoring Pilot Project , and defines phenology as " the study of ' phenophases' , which are the different phases that plants and animals go through in their life cycle each year." She's plotted points all over a map of the reserve, to examine the development of several species of plants and animals during this very busy time of...

Duration: 00:04:43


Does Climate Change Mean I Can Start My Seedlings Early?

3/20/2017
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Those early hints of spring can call to a gardener like a siren song. Yet the urge to get one’s seeds into dirt can be dangerous: most seedlings won’t survive a single frost. To help with that, gardeners use 30-year averages that predict when the last frost will probably occur. The thing is, in New England, climate change has temperatures rising relatively quickly.

Duration: 00:03:44

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