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RadioWest

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Location:

Salt Lake City, UT

Networks:

PRI

Description:

A radio conversation where people tell stories that explore the way the world works. Produced by KUER 90.1 in Salt Lake City and hosted by Doug Fabrizio.

Language:

English

Contact:

(801) 585-WEST


Episodes

Trauma, a Crime, and the Legacy of Vietnam

9/20/2017
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In April 2012, a Vietnamese man stabbed random white males in a supermarket parking lot in Salt Lake City. Throughout the incident he was heard to shout, “You killed my people, you should all die!” Witnesses and police suspected the attack was in part motivated by delusional recollections of the Vietnam War, which ended before the attacker was born. In a new book, Utah Poet Laureate Paisley Rekdal examines what this violent outburst can tell us about war’s traumatic effects on communities...

Duration: 00:47:37


A Conversation with Rod Decker

9/19/2017
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Tuesday, Utah reporter Rod Decker is our guest. Decker just retired after 37 years at Utah CBS affiliate KUTV Channel 2, and he’s got a lot of stories to tell. Decker is known for his unique delivery and for jumping head-long into a story, whether it meant antics to get the viewers’ attention or blunt questions to get a politician’s answer. We’ll discuss his observations on Utah politics and culture, how serving in Vietnam made him skeptical of liberals, and the fact he doesn’t watch TV.

Duration: 00:44:02


Playing Indian at the Wellsville Sham Battle

9/18/2017
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For almost a century, the citizens of Wellsville, Utah, have held an annual spectacle called the “Sham Battle.” It’s an historical reënactment, with white people costumed as Native American Indians attacking Mormon settlers. But the 19 th -century battle it purports to depict isn’t the full story, which, of course, is much more complicated. Monday, we’re talking about the Wellsville Sham Battle and the long history in this country of white people dressing up and acting like Indians.

Duration: 00:42:22


Turf War

9/15/2017
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It's no secret that Americans love their lawns. In fact, grass is the largest crop in the United States. But as water becomes more scarce and chemical treatments more toxic, an anti-lawn movement has sprouted. Some are questioning whether we should keep our finely-manicured grass or plant gardens instead. Friday, Doug talks lawns with The New Yorker's Elizabeth Kolbert about her article " Turf War ," and Ted Steinberg, author of American Green: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Lawn ....

Duration: 00:51:18


How America Went Haywire

9/14/2017
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How did we end up here? How did America get to this post-truth moment, where the line blurs between reality and illusion? In a new book, radio host and author Kurt Andersen lays out a timeline for how we lost our collective mind. And really, it’s nothing new. America, Andersen says, has always been a country of true believers, wishful dreamers, hucksters and suckers, and we’ve always been uniquely susceptible to fantasy. Andersen joins us Wednesday to explore the 500-year history of a...

Duration: 00:50:16


Through the Lens: Mr. Gaga

9/13/2017
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Israeli choreographer Ohad Naharin is one of the dance world’s most important figures. He can be demanding and intimidating, but professional dancers have pushed beyond their personal limits to express his unique movement language. It’s called “gaga.” Naharin says it’s about listening to the body before telling it what to do. Wednesday, we continue our series on documentary film with a profile of Naharin’s life and work. Director Tomer Heymann joins us to tell the fascinating story of an...

Duration: 00:52:06


If Our Bodies Could Talk

9/12/2017
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We all want to make good health decisions, but every day a new study comes out that seems to change the game. Fat’s bad for you; then it’s good. Count calories. Don’t. Add in all the marketing and news media, and it’s hard to tell the good stuff from the snake oil. James Hamblin is a doctor-turned-journalist, and in his writing for The Atlantic magazine he wades through the noise to find the signal. He joins us Tuesday to help us better understand how to listen to and take care of our bodies.

Duration: 00:49:21


The History and Power of the Swastika

9/11/2017
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The swastika. Few symbols, few words even, evoke such visceral reactions in the Western world. It stands for genocide and hatred. But it wasn’t always that way. For centuries it symbolized good fortune, success, and well-being. It held deep religious and spiritual meaning for people around the world. Graphic designer Steven Heller has long been fascinated by the swastika, and he joins us Monday to discuss its power and history. Can it ever be seen in its original context again?

Duration: 00:51:21


The Hidden Brain

9/9/2017
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NPR’s Shankar Vedantam says that in some ways, human behavior is the ultimate frontier of science. After all, there’s a lot we don’t know about why behave the way we do. But if we can get a glimpse at the unconscious patterns that influence us, Vedantam argues we have the potential to make big changes in our lives and our world. Shankar Vedantam is host of the popular podcast Hidden Brain, and he joins us to explain how science and storytelling can improve the human experience. (Rebroadcast)

Duration: 00:52:05


Don Quixote

9/1/2017
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Today, Don Quixote is regarded as one of the most important novels ever written. But when it debuted 400 years ago, Miguel Cervantes’ book was deemed unworthy of serious artistic consideration. Ilan Stavans, a professor of Latin American and Latino Culture, has a profound affection for the tale of don Quixote de la Mancha, and he says the wandering knight’s adventure through life mirrors our own. Stavans joins us Friday to explore how Don Quixote rose to global success and gave rise to...

Duration: 00:50:54


Defying the Nazis

8/31/2017
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In January 1939, Unitarian minister Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha received a call: would they travel to Europe to help Jewish dissidents and refugees under threat of Nazi persecution? While few Americans were paying attention to Hitler’s growing power, the Sharps agreed to the dangerous mission. Their grandson, the filmmaker Artemis Joukowsky, created a documentary that explores their incredible work. He joined us to talk about how the Sharp’s actions saved hundreds and altered the...

Duration: 00:49:47


The Seeds of Life

8/30/2017
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It’s a timeless question, asked by every kid that’s ever lived: where do babies come from? It turns out even the great scientific minds of the Enlightenment didn’t really have an answer. While navigators and cartographers seemed to have mastered the heavens and the Earth, other scientists were conducting bizarre experiments to put their finger on how exactly humans create life. Science writer Edward Dolnick joins us to tell the story of 250 years of searching and the meandering ways of...

Duration: 00:52:05


The History and Ethics of Suicide

8/29/2017
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Questions surrounding suicide have been with us for at least as long as we’ve had written record, and the answers are as varied as the times and places where they were discussed. Tuesday, Doug's guest is the philosophy scholar Margaret Battin. She’s spent her career collecting the works of religious and secular thinkers regarding suicide. It has been considered noble, immoral, heroic and cowardly, and we’ll talk about what all of those views teach us about end-of-life issues today....

Duration: 00:52:00


Land on Fire

8/28/2017
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Nature writer Gary Ferguson says we are facing a “perfect storm” when it comes to wildfires. Climate change has led to less snow, longer droughts, and more wind and there’s a lot of fuel on the forest floors. The result is ten more weeks of fire season than we saw in the early '70s, and those fires are hotter and often beyond control. Ferguson joins us to talk about the role fire should play in a healthy ecosystem and the new reality of wildfire in the West. (Rebroadcast)

Duration: 00:51:06


The Hidden Kennedy Daughter

8/25/2017
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Friday, biographer Kate Clifford Larson is with us to talk about the life of Rosemary Kennedy. She was a sister of John F. Kennedy, a vivacious beauty, and also intellectually challenged. As the Kennedy family’s power grew, her parents were anxious to keep her from the public eye. So at 23, she was lobotomized and institutionalized. Larson joins us to explain what Rosemary’s story reveals about the way we once dealt with disabilities, and how her life eventually inspired the Kennedys’...

Duration: 00:51:49


A Conversation with Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

8/24/2017
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Historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich grew up in Sugar City, Idaho, and in the late Fifties, she figured she would just “get married and have children.” So it may surprise you to hear that she coined the phrase “well-behaved women seldom make history.” Ulrich is a Mormon, a feminist, a Harvard professor, and a Pulitzer Prize-winner. She’s dedicated her career to telling the stories of early American women and helping modern women find their voices, and joins Doug on Thursday. (Rebroadcast)

Duration: 00:51:23


The Trouble with Reality

8/23/2017
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In her latest book, media analyst Brooke Gladstone tries to understand the current landscape of “fact” and “truth” in the United States. Facts, she says are crucial for negotiation and compromise in a democracy. Truth, though, is subjective. So how have we reached a point where reality is so fractured? Gladstone joins Doug to talk about lies, the Trump administration, journalism, and why we all need to know more about each other's truth. (Rebroadcast)

Duration: 00:52:07


The Invention of Nature

8/22/2017
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Tuesday, we’re telling the story of the incredible life and work of naturalist Alexander von Humboldt. At the turn of the 19th century, Humboldt trekked across Latin America, exploring rain forests, mapping rivers, and climbing volcanoes. The journey led him to a groundbreaking vision of nature and a prediction of human-induced climate change. Doug’s guest is historian Andrea Wulf, whose new book combines biography and science to remember the man she calls the father of the environmental...

Duration: 00:52:17


The Life and Legacy of Richard Nixon

8/21/2017
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“Few came so far, so fast, and so alone,” writes John Farrell in a new biography of President Richard Nixon. Nixon was an idealistic dreamer when he returned from World War II, and he quickly scaled the political ladder. After winning the presidency in 1969, he and his staff pursued progressive reforms and opened relations with China. But Nixon, says Farrell, had another, darker legacy: a divided and polarized America. Farrell joins us Monday to discuss Richard Nixon and the world he made....

Duration: 00:52:06


The Rise of Addictive Technology

8/18/2017
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Marketing professor Adam Alter begins his new book by noting that Steve Jobs didn’t let his own children use an iPad, a product he invented, because he was worried they’d get addicted to it. That’s what Alter’s book is about: our increasing addiction to technology. These days, we aren’t just hooked on substances, like drugs and alcohol. We’re addicted to video games, social media, porn, email, and lots more. Alter joins us to explore the business and psychology of irresistible...

Duration: 00:52:09

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